allaboutgeorge + newspaper   8

On the Media: Las Vegas Review-Journal lawsuits prompt fair use debate ...
"Fair use" on the Internet would seem to be a use that probes and ponders the original, possibly repackaging or rewriting it, without subsuming it. A fair use calls attention to an interesting story or news flash, perhaps elaborates on it or disputes it, but doesn't replace it.

Two Web journalists who Twittered me on Tuesday independently offered the same rule of thumb —- don't republish more than three paragraphs. Always name your source. Always link to the original.

Reporters and editors get understandably peeved when they see paragraph after paragraph of their work reprinted by competitors — regurgitation so extensive that there's no reason for the reader to seek out the original, even when a link is provided.
copyright  journalism  media  newspaper  blogging  community  reputation  lasvegas  nevada  law  fairuse 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
What Would Micropayments Mean for Journalists? « The Digitalists
In fact, in this hour of crisis, newspapers should be moving in the exact opposite direction to generate revenue — focusing not on specific articles, but rather on delivering valuable experiences to their readers, whether that takes the form of articles, databases, multimedia, user-generated content, or whatever else will serve the audience’s needs. It is the entirety of that experience that will deliver goodwill and revenue opportunities down the road.
newspaper  economics  online  journalism  media  business  data  information  reading  social  money 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Can the Statusphere Save Journalism?
If you are a journalist, it’s now your responsibility to create a dedicated tribe that supports, shares, and responds to your work and personal interaction in both the Statusphere and also at the point of origin. It’s the only way to build a valuable and portable community around you and what you represent.
media  journalism  newspapers  business  news  internet  social  socialnetworking  communication  twitter  facebook  future  newspaper 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Overview: Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources
"It finds four distinct segments in today's news audience: Integrators, who comprise 23% of the public; the less populous Net-Newsers (13%); Traditionalists - the oldest (median age: 52) and largest news segment (46% of the public); and the Disengaged (14%) who stand out for their low levels of interest in the news and news consumption."
m  media  journalism  online  internet  news  research  data  reference  demographics  tv  newspaper  attention  identity  reputation 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge

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