allaboutgeorge + news   239

How Gordon Parks Became Gordon Parks - The New York Times
He understood the silence of African-American history in terms of the larger story. And he was determined to make sure that his story was told, and the breadth of his story was told from multiple perspectives, from a boy growing up in the Midwest, to someone who had a dream about being a photographer. His life was complex. And it was not one-dimensional, as most people think when they see someone who is black and poor in that time period.
photography  culture  journalism  attention  news  media  black  history  documentary 
5 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Cory Booker on the 2020 Presidential Race
“I often leave this building at ten, 11 o’clock at night, along with the few remaining staffers, who are overwhelmingly white,” he says. “And then you see this long line of workers lining up to get in: the late-night shift. And they’re all African-American. So this building — these buildings — literally turn majority black at night. Because they are the people who are cleaning this place.”
news  politics  newjersey  2020 
7 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Americans Are Shifting The Rest Of Their Identity To Match Their Politics | FiveThirtyEight
On the Democratic side, 60 percent of Hillary Clinton’s voters were non-Hispanic white people. At times, political coverage (including my own articles) overemphasizes the roles that Asians, blacks and Latinos play in the Democratic Party. But just because most nonwhite voters are Democrats, that doesn’t mean most Democrats are nonwhite. In fact, white women are the biggest racial/gender cohort in the Democratic Party, according to the Pew data.
news  identity  politics  2010s  clinton  democrats  republicans  lgbt  religion  men  women 
8 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
NYTimes: Facebook Fueled Anti-Refugee Attacks in Germany, New Research Suggests
Their reams of data converged on a breathtaking statistic: Wherever per-person Facebook use rose to one standard deviation above the national average, attacks on refugees increased by about 50 percent.

Nationwide, the researchers estimated in an interview, this effect drove one-tenth of all anti-refugee violence.

The uptick in violence did not correlate with general web use or other related factors; this was not about the internet as an open platform for mobilization or communication. It was particular to Facebook.
socialnetworking  socialmedia  facebook  immigration  news  journalism  web  community  communication  identity  research 
11 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Meet the five urban Chinas
China’s unprecedented urbanization ensures that its cities will collectively shape and define national trends related to infrastructure, technology, and economic growth. And because those cities loom large on the world’s economic stage, their continued evolution will help dictate key global economic, social, and environmental outcomes.
news  china  asia  economy  cities  urban 
june 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Hanya Yanagihara: influential magazine editor by day, best-selling author by night | Books | The Guardian
The private,” she says, “becomes much more sharply private when you have a job, especially one that’s in the world. It reminds you on a daily basis of what people sound like, how they move, what their concerns are, how they think.”
news  work  magazines  writing  journalism  privacy 
april 2018 by allaboutgeorge
This article is worthless – Andrew Dunn – Medium
"Chasing page views is a losing battle. Building a stable of committed, enthusiastic subscribers is the only way to sustain a news product in the Internet era. Journalists who are able to help do this will become increasingly valuable."
journalism  audience  writing  media  newspapers  news 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
An inside look at Google's news-ranking algorithm
Google itself has offered minimal insight about the algorithms it uses to discover and rank news stories. All the company will say publicly is that articles are selected and ranked based on metrics such as how often and on what sites a story appears; freshness of content; location; relevance; and diversity. The company has claimed that it constantly fine-tunes its news ranking to ensure high quality content is shown.
twitter  facebook  google  news  journalism  media  search  data 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
How important are all those ugly Tweet Buttons to news sites? » Nieman Journalism Lab
I wish folks used them far less than they do now. Time to rethink their use in certain places ...
twitter  social  news  google  sharing  journalism  media  web 
june 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Google’s Richard Gingras: 8 questions that will help define the future of journalism » Nieman Journalism Lab
While technology holds great promise, it’s important to recognize that while technology has value it has no “values.” Technology, in and of itself, is not the solution. Yes, it can provide the means for solutions, but it is up to us to determine how to make it so.

We need to rethink every facet of the journalism model in light of the dramatic changes in the architecture of the news ecosystem. I’m not suggesting that everything must change, but a comprehensive rethinking is a necessary and valuable intellectual process.
journalism  media  newspapers  news  google  content  narrative  writing  reporting  work  data  search  social  design  innovation 
april 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Why Mobile Web Matters | NPR Digital Services
A Nielsen survey shows that a third of tablet and smartphone owners have downloaded a news app in the past 30 days. In addition, news apps can be very successful at driving deeper engagement with content. For people using NPR apps, for example, there are more pageviews and more return visits than for people using NPR.org.

But for all their success, the benefits of having an app (especially as an engine for capturing new audience) are starting to plateau, because apps are turning out to be most successful for only one segment of your audience. Research is showing that apps attract the particularly loyal segment of your audience who is already consuming a lot more news. In a study of tablet users, Pew found that these “power news users” spend twice as much time consuming news as do browser users. For users who want a daily fix and are proud advocates of stations, apps are the preferred channel.

But of course, stations want to reach a wider audience of casual users as well. And for this larger segment of casual users, mobile-optimized web pages are the preferred way to access your content.
mobile  digital  android  iphone  iOS  apps  web  news  engagement 
april 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Jason Calacanis: "Blogging Is Dead" & Why "Stupid People Shouldn't Write"
"The concept of journalism is going away," Calacanis said. "It is not enough to be a writer. You need to be a writer and an expert."

Calacanis brings up the idea of local news as something that people do not care about. In that vein, he thinks that AOL local news effort Patch, which the company has poured millions of dollars into, will ultimately fail. Instead of just the news of a local McDonalds being built, people want how much that new franchise will cost, what benefit it will have for the local economy etc.

"People bring up the edge case of the local town meeting," Calacanis said. "Who gives a f***l? Nobody cares anymore."
news  hyperlocal  journalism  media  newspapers  patch  business  attention 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why Are We Still Consuming News Like It’s 1899? | benhuh!com
I am trying to create a dialog to raise awareness to solve this problem. This project’s goal is to create discussions around how and what we can do to solve the problems we face with news presentation today. I’m no more qualified to lead this discussion than an average news junkie. It’s been too long since journalism school and I don’t work in the news, but I would like to bring together great minds and passionate people around this problem.
journalism  media  newspapers  news  technology 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Real time, All the time: Why every news organisation has to be live « Emily Bell(wether)
Live is not ‘yet another thing’ for a working journalist to understand , it is the great journalistic challenge of our time. The skill involved in providing real time valuable information for audiences around stories as they happen is crucial to being a credible journalist and a resilient news organisation. For those who question whether this kind of journalism can be valuable or high quality, there are three examples I can immediately think of to show them which rebuts the idea (if anybody realy still holds it)  that working in real time degrades good journalism.
journalism  technology  attention  reputation  news  media  social 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
News innovation isn't just about writing code, it is about how we use that code to tell stories
Technical innovation in software is not about writing code from scratch. There is a huge body of prior art available that developers use to get their ideas to function.

And journalism has a huge body of prior art in story-telling techniques, in synthesising complex problems into something our audience can grasp quickly over breakfast, and in engaging our audiences and making them passionate about issues that affect their day-to-day lives. The innovative news organisations today are the ones constantly experimenting with new digital tools as new ways to source stories, address their audience, and engage with the public.
journalism  media  news  story  software  technology  engagement  attention  DFMchat 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
New ranking combines print-digital reach of metro papers, reveals surprising winners | Poynter.
The list includes several groups of papers with common ownership and common market geography. Those are MediaNews’s clusters in the San Francisco Bay and Los Angeles area and the Chicago Sun-Times group, including its suburban papers. Also, in these figures the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News are treated as two editions of the same newspaper for purposes of audience measurement.
MediaNews  journalism  media  news  bayarea  lonsangeles  chicago 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Local news is going mobile. | Pew Internet & American Life Project
One-quarter (24%) of mobile local news consumers report having an app that helps them get information or news about their local community. That equates to 13% of all device owners and 11% of the total American adult population. Thus while nearly 5 in 10 get local news on mobile devices, just 1 in 10 use apps to do so. Call it the app gap.

These mobile app users skew young and Hispanic. They are also much more active news consumers than other adults, using more sources regularly and “participating” in local news by doing such things as sharing or posting links to local stories, commenting on or tagging local news content, or contributing their own local content online.

Many news organizations are looking to mobile platforms to provide new ways to generate revenue in local markets. [...] Currently, only 10% of adults who use mobile apps to connect to local news and information pay for those apps. This amounts to just 1% of all adults.
mobile  local  news  journalism  games  information  location  technology  software  latino 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The 'gamification' of news, and how it can be relevant | Old Media, New Tricks
Imagine a reader using her smart phone to open your news app while she’s sitting at a coffee shop. Instead of just the latest, or even hand-picked top stories, appearing on the main page, what if it had a section that showed news that was relevant to the area around that coffee shop? What if the “game” were that users get points for reading the news about all sections of the city (as they travel and check your stories, a map fills in, showing they saw the latest news for that area)? The game mechanic added in could also just be to show which of their Facebook friends had read the same stories, at the same location. So when you log into the app at that coffee shop, it tells you that three of your friends read the news from your site from that same shop. Users could also leave comments on the story that are location-specific or just a tip about the coffee shop (which could be displayed next to your news organization’s review, which also could appear thanks to location tagging).
news  media  newspapers  information  data  journalism  social  location  games  attention  community  mapping  presence 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Voices: News organizations must become hubs of trusted data in a market seeking (and valuing) trust » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
The maximum size of money moved by trust is the combined value of all advertising, PR, and the millions of hours people spend searching for a reliable piece of information or good advice on what product they should get. In other words, it’s huge, and no one who is just in for a quick dollar can compete. If media companies find a winning combination of data and good stories to fulfill that need, they will be vaulted out of a dying market defined by technology (printing presses, radio stations, satellites) and into the trust market.

In a multiplatform world, “trust” is the defining attribute that moves goods and services. Most marketing and advertising can’t be trusted: The system behind it does not allow buyers to learn if the newest camera from a company is actually any good. Advertising will always try to create a good impression for a product and service, but eventually people learn that it’s not the looks of a product that makes it valuable, but its day-to-day usability.
attention  media  journalism  technology  power  news  relationships  ethics  behavior 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Hyperlocal News Can’t Be Monetized And Other Lies You Heard This Week About TBD.com « Digital First
Five telling developments probably contributed to the end of TBD. They have less to do whether a “hyperlocal” approach is doable (in fact, it’s the core of the new news ecosystem with thousands of successful examples), and more to do with the organization required to achieve something like this.
journalism  online  media  news  washington  hyperlocal 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How journalists are using metrics to track the success of tweets | Poynter.
“The thing is, I am insistent that my tweets be very human-sounding and a genuine representation of myself, so it might sound counterintuitive to make decisions based on data,” Victor told me. “But I don’t think there’s a conflict there, and I don’t think it makes you a robot. Looking at the data is just listening to what your followers are silently telling you.”
data  information  journalism  media  blogging  twitter  news  attention  audience  curation  reputation  business  technology 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Reflections of a Newsosaur: iTunes subscriptions won’t stop free news
The best a publisher can hope to do with iTunes or any other system is to capture payments from the relatively small number of individuals who are too busy, too oblivious or too ethical to pay for content instead of scrounging it for free.

This is not to say newspapers and other publishers don’t deserve to be compensated for the investment they make in reporting the news. But the reality that publishers have to accept is that the marketplace is bigger than they are.
music  news  itunes  apple  media  journalism  newspapers  business  technology  free 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Economics of Blogging and The Huffington Post - NYTimes.com
One reason that The Huffington Post gets a lot of criticism for not paying its bloggers is because most people think of it as a publishing company, when really — like Facebook — it is more of a technology company. Whether the content is paid or unpaid, the site is able to generate a comparatively large amount of revenue from it because of things like search engine optimization, and the way that its editors use their page space: a poorly-performing article will all but disappear from the site almost as soon as it is posted, while a strong one can hold its 32-point headline for hours. The Huffington Post, also, makes itself “stickier” by providing an abundance of links to other articles and to social networking tools.
data  blogging  news  journalism  media  newspapers  technology  business  aol  attention  economics 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
AOL-HuffPo: Acquisition of means of production without being revolutionary at all | Capital New York
Search engines improve by delivering you more of the results that you were hoping for when you search for something; so it gets better when it relies on social networks than it does when it relies on algorithms. And this is where the future starts to look brighter for "original content" producers: This is a road that leads, ultimately, to the people who produce what they produce and get their readers without tricking them into reading. Which means Arianna Huffington will get better at her job, and your readers will get better at finding you, will stay longer when they get there, and, if you play your cards right, will start going straight to you instead of waiting for Arianna to tell them to. Then, maybe you can capture a sliver of the business she's going to be getting.

It's that sliver that is going to grow next. And as it does, the scale will even out, potentially putting Arianna herself, and places like AOL, on the defense once again.
aol  technology  search  google  social  news  media  journalism  business 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Reflections of a Newsosaur: Prime time for iPad may be prime time
While these findings suggest interesting ways to release, package and market content for the iPad, it also must be noted that the research is limited to a sample of people who are sufficiently motivated to time-shift content to use this particular app.

Until someone researches consumption patterns across the entire universe of iPad owners, we won’t know whether this group of users is typical or exceptional.

If a broader study finds that prime time indeed is the prime time for iPad use, newspaper publishers may want to consider producing products that come out early in the evening, instead of in the morning or after their print products are put to bed at midnight.

Fresh news timed to arrive at dinnertime would be an interesting blast from the past for those of us who once worked on afternoon newspapers.
mobile  ipad  news  journalism  media  tablet  apple  technology  attention 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
“There’s a lot of pressure to play for the short term”: The Bay Citizen’s editor on its $15 million future » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
“The partnership, I think, has tended to push us in a little bit more traditional direction than we might have gone otherwise,” Weber told me. “There’s definitely an issue of orientation. If you’re thinking about something as a New York Times story, you think about it differently than if it’s just going to run on baycitizen.org. I think it’s made the coverage feel a little bit more traditional in its approach.” Were it not for the partnership, quite possibly, “we would be further along in developing the kind of voice and style of our own kind of journalism.”
entrepreneurs  journalism  media  bayarea  news  nytimes  reputation 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Dean Singleton interview about stepping down as CEO of MediaNews Group - Denver News - The Latest Word
"The opportunity in new media is not really different than print was for the last hundred years. We talk about selling newspapers, but we never really got paid for content. We got paid for the paper and ink it was printed on, but we built large audiences and got paid by the advertisers who wanted to reach that audience. I don't think new media is going to be that much different, and I don't think we'll get a lot of money for that content. We never have and we probably never will. But the audience we're building will generate a lot of revenue, and the more focused and fine-tuned that audience is, the higher rate you can get for that audience. And we're learning to do that."
media  medianews  news  journalism  deansingleton  business  technology  publishing 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Consolidation Considered for MediaNews, Freedom Communications - WSJ.com
MediaNews Group Inc., publisher of more than 50 daily U.S. newspapers including the Denver Post, is eyeing a merger with Freedom Communications Inc. and possibly several other newspaper companies, according to a person familiar with the matter.

Affiliated Media Inc., MediaNews' holding company, filed for bankruptcy protection a year ago and emerged in March under the ownership of dozens of lenders including the investment firm Alden Global Capital. Alden also is part of a group of lenders that now owns Freedom Communications, which publishes the Orange County Register. Freedom emerged from bankruptcy protection last April.

The person familiar with the matter said Alden wants to roll at least some of its various newspaper hodings into a single company. Alden was part of a group of financial firms that emerged last year as the winner of the auction of the Philadelphia Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News. [...]
medianews  news  media  journalism  newspapers  california  business  deansingleton 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
NPR's Giffords Mistake: Re-Learning the Lesson of Checking Sources : NPR Ombudsman : NPR
“The upside of having information first is fleeting,” said Garcia. “The downside is enormous, painful. Everyone feels awful.”
media  journalism  radio  politics  power  news 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Debate over journalism's required skills gets heated
I do not believe programming replaces a story. Never has, never will. When was the last time you had a driveway moment with a database?
But, also, when was the last time you were able to understand the weight of 251,287 cable dispatches without a database?
Those are made possible because of different, yet equally important, skills. And thankfully, regardless of your answer, we don't have to choose.
journalism  newspapers  media  online  data  information  technology  news 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Chalmers Johnson, author of Blowback; The Sorrows of Empire, Dead at 79 | CommonDreams.org
In one of my fondest memories of Chalmers and Sheila Johnson at their home with their then Russian blue cats, MITI and MOF, named after the two engines of Japan's political economy -- Chal railed against the journal, Foreign Affairs, which he saw as a clap trap of statist conventionalism. He decided he had had enough of the journal and of the organization that published it, the Council on Foreign Relations. So, Chalmers called the CFR and told the young lady on the phone to cancel his membership.

The lady said, "Professor Johnson, I'm sorry sir. No one cancels their membership in the Council in Foreign Relations. Membership is for life. People are canceled when they die."

Chalmers Johnson, not missing a beat, said "Consider me dead."
foreign  empire  military  economy  japan  news  politics  power  geography  books  nonfiction  obituaries 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Three signs your newsroom isn’t ready to cross the digital divide | Knight Digital Media Center
I am startled these days to hear that some newsrooms are still doing digital as an add-on to their print operation. While I get that the print newspaper is still the cash cow (albeit one that is slimming down), newsrooms that want to have a future need to get cracking on building for a digital future. That may mean shoving aside many vestiges of print times now gone.
newspapers  online  news  future  leadership  technology  mobile  media  journalism 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Better-Off Online - Pew Research Center
Those who fall in the top earnings category are also the biggest consumers of online news sources, with 80% of higher-income internet users (74% of the general population) seeking news on the internet.

However, the higher-income households have not abandoned traditional media altogether; they also turn to print and television, especially for local news. Asked about various platforms where they might get the news on a typical day, 76% o those from higher-income households watch local and national news shows on television, 51% of this higher-income group said they get local news from a print version of a newspaper, and 22% read a print version of a newspaper for national news.Still, the online news consumption patterns of this more well-off group stand in stark contrast to those living in the lowest income households.
wealth  diversity  reference  internet  web  technology  usa  research  mobile  media  newspapers  journalism  news 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why spreadable doesn’t equal viral: A conversation with Henry Jenkins » Nieman Journalism Lab
NU: What is spreadable media?

HJ: The concept of spreadable media rests on the distinction between distribution (the top-down spread of media content as captured in the broadcast paradigm) and circulation (a hybrid system where content spreads as a result of a series of informal transactions between commercial and noncommercial participants.) Spreadable media is media which travels across media platforms at least in part because the people take it in their own hands and share it with their social networks.
media  journalism  news  culture  web  socialnetworking  theory  socialmedia  libraries  social  attention  public 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Jonathan Stray » What’s the point of social news?
[...] For me, the core idea of social news-gathering is that the audience is, or could be, an extension of the news organization’s source network.

Hopefully, a newsroom knows about interesting developments before anyone else, and then verifies and publicizes them, but that’s getting near impossible when anyone can publish, and when virality can amplify primary sources without the involvement of a media organization. We don’t know yet very much about collective news-gathering, but there are promising directions. It seems like maybe there are two broad categories of breaking news: public events that anyone could have witnessed, and private events initially known only to privileged observers. [...]
news  twitter  facebook  social  media  newspapers  journalism  authority  reputation  communication  technology 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
open letter to newspaper photographers | Redlights and Redeyes
What you need to do, Newspaper Photographer, is a few things. Right now. Trust me. I’ve done it.
newspapers  business  photography  inspiration  freelance  diy  journalism  media  news 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Value of Your Time and How it Impacts the Internet Video vs Traditional TV battle « blog maverick
I’m going to let you in on a secret. The only 20 somethings that are going to consume media in 10 years the way they do today are the ones without a job, still living with their parents.

I’m going to let you in on another secret. The older you get, the faster time goes by. I’m sure there is some scientific explanation for this phenomena. I don’t know it. But I know it is true. Months and years go back faster and faster the older you get.

Which in turn leads to the next truism. The older you get, the more you value your time. You quickly learn that your most valuable possession/asset isn’t one you put on a balance sheet or in your home. It is time. Every minute, hour, day is one you will never get back and there is nothing you can do to earn another.

So what does this have to do with Internet, Internet video and traditional TV ?
news  internet  video  socialmedia  social  television  time  attention 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The 100 Percent Solution: For Innovation in News » Pressthink
In a time of contraction in the news industry, and of diminished expectations in the workaday world of professional journalism, we need counter-cyclical measures that broaden our ambitions, widen the lens and insist that with new tools and greater participation–what Alan Rusbridger calls the mutualization of journalism–we can do way more than we were ever able to do before.
news  innovation  writing  journalism  media  business  social 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Poynter Online - The Biz Blog - USA Today's "Radical Restructuring" Means End of Newsroom Integration, Universal Desk
Part of the lengthy internal research that led to the changes, Hunke said, was a conclusion that USA Today and other newspapers may have gotten off track trying to woo young audiences or women with a something-for-everyone approach. He has concluded that the print edition should now mainly target an older, general news audience, who favor a traditional presentation.

By contrast, Hunke said, early data on digital tablet buyers indicate that they skew 10 to 15 years younger than the typical print reader. That suggests both a different style of presentation and a different content mix.
journalism  editing  business  media  news  tablet  ipad  newspapers  gannett  marketing 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Bartz On Blogging: “An Extremely Hard Engineering Feat”
Instead of a technology stack, she talks about a “content stack,” with original Yahoo editorial on top, followed by licensed news and articles from other sources, “pro blogging,” and then crowdsourced news and information at the bottom (presumably, that will come from her Associated Content acquisition).
yahoo  blogging  news  journalism  information  media  business 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Email Still Tops Facebook for Keeping in Touch - eMarketer
Email is a more targeted form of sending content; while content-sharers may shoot off mass emails to large distribution lists, most email shares are likely sent to a person or small group selected based on the specific content being shared.

Sharing via social networks like Facebook, by contrast, typically involves feeding items to an entire friends list. The youngest users, who care the least about whether the recipients of their content actually want to see it, are also most likely to disseminate the information to the widest group. And the seniors and older boomers who find the recipients' needs more important dramatically favor email for sharing, suggesting they are sending relevant items to only those who will want them.
email  facebook  social  news  media  journalism  marketing  research  socialmedia  demographics 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz: 'creepy' Facebook is biggest rival - USATODAY.com
Q: You are starting a local news operation for San Francisco. Tell us about your plans to offer local information.

A: We all live in a place. You live in small communities, and you are very interested in what happens in those communities from police blotters to what happened in the city council or the neighborhood watch. It is interesting to the consumer.

And it is interesting to the advertiser because it is the ultimate target. Statistics are 95% of our purchases are (made) within 2 miles of our house, 5 miles of our house.
media  local  journalism  yahoo  technology  mobile  marketing  information  news  sanfrancisco  bayarea  community  facebook  social 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
What “engagement” means to Tracy Record and West Seattle Blog « RJI
A lot of her traffic comes from people who are curious about what they’re seeing or hearing. They’re seeking facts. And by the next morning, they’re not still interested in whether there really were orcas off the coast nearby. They want to know what’s going on now, in a hollering-across-town-square sort of way. They want to holler back about what they know or have observed. The blog hardly ever ASKS people to holler back, as in “tell us what you know, dear readers.” But the culture of the site is known to invite participation, and so people participate.
media  journalism  seattle  news  online  attention  communication 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
CNN's research says 27% of us share 87% of news links | Media | guardian.co.uk
"Though recommended news seems highly unpredictable, we've have identified a number of key drivers and key motivations, so we do have some ways of understanding what people share and why they share," he said. "There's more engagement in emotional terms with content and advertising in the recommended scenario, as opposed to randomly consumed content advertising, and brands that are around recommended stories also benefit from stronger recognition and recall."
news  media  public  attention  journalism  newspapers  social  marketing  business 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Standby Crisis Mappers Task Force: Apply Now! | iRevolution
[...] This is where the Crowd Force Team comes in. This important team doesn’t need prior-training; only Internet access, browsing experience, an interest in online maps, news, etc. Perhaps most importantly, members of the Crowd Force Team are known for their energy, commitment, team-player attitude and can-do mentality. [...]
mapping  emergency  disaster  volunteering  internet  news 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Billboard.biz: Exclusive: Sources Detail Google's Proposal For A Music Service
Google's cloud-based locker would scan a subscriber's hard drive for music files. Any tracks that Google recognizes as music that it has licensed would be listed by Google as being accessible to the user from their cloud-based account. Such tracks could include those purchased at the Google download store or another download retailer, tracks ripped from a CD and even music files downloaded from peer-to-peer networks.

While the inclusion of P2P tracks may get some pushback from label executives, some sources acknowledge that in order for this concept to work, they may have to allow P2P tracks to populate lockers. But they also point out that in return, the labels would probably press Google to take stronger measures to fight music piracy, such as excluding P2P sites from search results or blocking the use of apps for Google's Android mobile operating system that facilitate P2P access.
google  android  mobile  music  news  media  business  online  p2p 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Poynter Online - Top Stories - paidContent's Rafat Ali Describes Grim View of Online News' Prospects
This is true for all startups: A startup is not a part-time business. But it's clearly, even doubly, true for news.

Firstly, doing an Internet startup is a very time-consuming thing. On top of that, you're trying to do a 24-hour news-based startup, which is a double whammy in terms of just the sheer amount of energy you need, and the sheer amount of resources, and the sheer amount of time that you need to put in there. So it clearly is going to be all-consuming in all ways you can possibly ... think, for however long you're doing it.

So be ready. It's a difficult, difficult slog. As I said, the sentence that I use a lot is that "I've burned the candle at both ends and the middle for the last eight years." It's taken a physical toll, a personal toll, a mental toll on me. I've come out on the other end fine.
journalism  media  news  interviews  online  business 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
How will the App Store’s “new newsstand” be censored? We’ll know it when we see it — Scott Rosenberg's Wordyard
Now Apple is saying, explicitly, that it intends to draw lines, and those lines won’t be drawn beforehand — but hey, don’t worry, because we’ll just know it when we cross them!

Apple loves to maintain tight control of things. That’s been a hugely successful approach for its hardware business. It’s even a defensible position applied to software. But it’s a lousy model for a newsstand.
apple  mobile  software  technology  journalism  ethics  censorship  media  news 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
AP announces editorial guidelines for credit and attribution
It’s important to note that we shouldn’t use facts from a non-member news organization, even with credit, so frequently that we appear to be systematically and continuously free riding on that organization’s work.

Crediting other organizations when they break a story and we match or further develop it:

If organization X breaks a story and we then match it through our own original reporting, we should say something like this: “The secret meeting in Paris was initially reported by X.”

This policy applies to spot stories as well as enterprise and investigative pieces.
ethics  journalism  media  news  attribution  newspapers  online 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
An iPhone app developer’s diary, and some thoughts on Android » Nieman Journalism Lab
If someone out there is interested in volunteering to help build an Android (or WebOS, or BlackBerry, or Windows Phone, or Symbian) version, I’d love to hear from you. We’ve got no animus against other platforms; we just don’t yet see an audience big enough to justify our scant resources.
android  technology  iphone  apple  news  journalism  media  software  blackberry  symbian 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Morning in America: It's All About the Local News | TheWrap.com
[...] The one most often spun by station managers is that lifestyles have changed: They’ll cite market research showing people are waking earlier for longer commutes and also building in time for pre-work routines such as the gym. And they have research showing these people want fresh news and information.

The more important reason is that these early risers are advertisers’ darlings. They’re usually employed, interested in what’s going on in the world, younger than news’ aging audiences and have some money to spend – whether at McDonald’s, the home decorating store or the cineplex. That’s why you’ll see big-brand advertisers all over the 5 a.m. broadcasts, while bail bondsmen and truck-driving training commercials populate 5 p.m. [...]
television  class  marketing  media  journalism  news  sleep  attention  radio 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Collaboration culture in news: No room for pettiness | Knight Digital Media Center
“It suggests equivalency, collegiality. The other news outlet, they’re not in a position just yet to be breaking anybody’s rice bowl. But the attitude above me is: well, who wants to help them get there?”
journalism  media  newspapers  hyperlocal  news  social  friendship  behavior  community 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Citizen Twitters to Keep Oakland Safe During Riots (Video) - The Bay Citizen
“We were looking at mainstream media to verify the facts we were getting mainly through Twitter feeds. But after some time we realized that there was a way to validate the authenticity of the tweets we were getting, by looking at the past content. As we followed the information related by different individuals, we quickly spotted who had been consistently accurate about incidences. We picked them up as trustworthy sources,” Chamales explained.
media  social  oakland  twitter  news  journalism  identity  authority 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
News organizations need mobile-first strategy « Pursuing the Complete Community Connection
We need to figure the best ways to deliver news and conduct commerce effectively on mobile devices: text messages, email, mobile applications, tweets, easy-to-use mobile web sites, podcasts, location-based news and commercial information.

Whatever your role in your media organization, consider how you would change your work, your priorities and your thinking to support a mobile-first strategy. This will either be our future or our next squandered opportunity.
business  community  innovation  iphone  journalism  media  mobile  news  newspapers 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Breaking News: The Top 5 mistakes newspaper make when news happens « Breaking News
It ironic that our strengths - our staff, equipment, professionalism, high journalistic standards - all work against us in the early stages of breaking news. We're flooding the zone, gathering information, checking it, making decisions about the importance and depth of the story , while ordinary folks just want to see what's going on, share what they know and learn what they can.

The relatively impoverished newsrooms of the placeblogs means that they HAVE to tap the community for the first stage reporting.

We NEED to.
journalism  news  newspapers  media  community  attention  flickr  social  socialmedia 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
MediaShift . NBC's Ryan Osborn Wants to Use Social Media for Storytelling
Do you have a social media policy as far as what people can say and can't say on their feeds?

Osborn: We have a Standards & Practices which we've spent a long time looking at and our lawyers have worked on. I think my role is communicating that in accessible ways to our newsrooms. Simple things like if you're on a plane and you say you don't like this airline, and then you cover that airline the next week, how will that jeopardize your position as an unbiased reporter or producer? It's something I want our people to start thinking about. The policies are in place but I think we could do a much better job communicating them.

Are there similar rules against talking about competitors or the workplace?

Osborn: No. There are some technicalities, but we want people to be themselves and encourage that; we want them to know that in some way the new reality is that they are representing NBC News and need to think about that. [...]
journalism  marketing  news  socialmedia  television  twitter  story  media 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Embrace the Wonk : CJR
These powerful, simple explanations are often married to an almost monastic skepticism of narratives that can’t be substantiated, or that are based in data—like voter’s accounts of their own thinking about politics—that are unreliable. Think about that for a moment, and the challenge to journalists becomes obvious: If much of what’s important about politics is either stable and predictable or unknowable, what’s the value of the sort of news—a hyperactive chronicle of the day’s events, coupled with instant speculation about their meaning—that has become a staple of modern political reporting? Indeed, much of the media criticism on The Monkey Cage is directed at narratives that, from the perspective of political science, are either irrelevant or unverifiable.
politics  power  science  research  blogging  technology  journalism  media  news 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Aggregators, curators, and indexers: There’s a difference, and it matters » Nieman Journalism Lab
For me, the lesson is simple. Anytime you hear someone talk about Google News, The Huffington Post, Gawker, blogging, aggregating, curation, and indexing as if they are the same phenomenon, ignore them. And if they attach that discussion to a set of policy recommendations, without acknowledging the full complexity of what it is people actually do when they aggregate, curate, and index information — well, then you should put your fingers in your ears and run in the other direction.
attention  reputation  technology  media  journalism  information  news  google  blogging 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Journalists Who Write Novels - Moving From Newswriting to Fiction
"When a you're a reporter you're writing about the facts of the situation, about very specific incidents, and it doesn't go beyond that," he says. "When you're writing fiction it's all about meaning and how things feel to your characters.

"You have to get out of your own point of view. In a story, don't think about how you would respond to a certain situation; think about how your characters would respond."
journalism  creativity  fiction  writing  books  news 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
OJR: Robert Niles: The 4 parts of an optimized online news site
You might have noticed that I haven't offered any suggestions how to blend these four core components. That's up to you. An optimal website is better than the competition, not one that matches or duplicates it. All I hope to do here is to inspire you to think about how might better optimize your publication to reach the growing, thriving audience that your publishing business needs.
design  news  journalism  online  media  internet  technology  business  attention  newspapers 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
A Conversation With Hunch Cofounder Caterina Fake
[...] But from our perspective, the social graph is actually less informative and actually gives you less valuable information on you than what we’re calling the taste graph because you may – I may be in contact with my co-workers, who are kind of like male engineer types and, with my mom, I have a very close relationship with. But our tastes are very different, the things that we like, the sushi restaurants or (unintelligible) that we’d be interested in…

Mr. ARRINGTON: Yeah.

Ms. FAKE: Or the clothes that we would wear and so, what we’re – our assumption is that there’s people out there who share similar taste. They have a similar aesthetic to you or they have, say, you’re kind of looking for a blog or a news show, your political position or political stance would inform that choice as well. So, that’s really what…

Mr. ARRINGTON: And this actually works?

Ms. FAKE: And this actually works, yes.
interviews  news  search  video  interview  internet  aesthetics  identity  attention  data 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Newsonomics of emerging news video » Nieman Journalism Lab
Before we look at what TEM does for these companies, consider two big numbers here: 10.5 million hours and 10 percent.

The 10.5 million hours is the number of hours of video content contracted by TEM, under its management. The 10 percent: that’s all it has been able to get to, so far.

So, look at how early we in this news video business. Most of what will be out there in the digital world — on our phones, tablets, desktops and laptops — isn’t out there yet, but will be over the next several years. It may take mid-2011, robust 4G networks to power our daily video usage, but it’s clear where this movie is headed.

What TEM does for content producers is make their assets more easily usable in the digital world.
video  online  blogging  newspapers  news  journalism  economics 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The iPad business model for news: Strategies publishers must embrace » Nieman Journalism Lab
One thing is for sure: No retailer, no marketing executive, no ad agency anywhere is looking to spend more money in any part of any newspaper. (Well, maybe you could find a few.) By and large, they’re looking to build more direct connections with consumers on digital platforms. And they see the iPad as the Next Big Thing.
news  journalism  newspapers  marketing  mobile  apple  publishing  media  social 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Final edition: Twilight of the American newspaper—By Richard Rodriguez (Harper's Magazine)
[...] In the nineteenth-century newspaper, the relationship between observer and observed was reciprocal: the newspaper described the city; the newspaper, in turn, was sustained by readers who were curious about the strangers that circumstance had placed proximate to them. So, I suppose, it is incomplete to notice that the San Francisco Chronicle has become remiss in its obituary department. Of four friends of mine who died recently in San Francisco, not one wanted a published obituary or any other public notice taken of his absence. This seems to me a serious abrogation of the responsibility of living in a city and as good an explanation as any of why newspapers are dying. All four of my friends requested cremation; three wanted their ashes consigned to the obscurity of Nature. Perhaps the cemetery is as doomed in America as the newspaper, and for the same reason: we do not imagine death as a city.

We no longer imagine the newspaper as a city or the city as a newspaper. [...]
media  journalism  newspapers  writing  news  death  obituaries  cities  california  essay  history  sanfrancisco  culture 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Potter: Daring hoax exposes limits of instant journalism - thestar.com
"This really brings home the reality that in the 24-hour news cycle you've got to be suspicious of just about everything until you confirm it," said media expert Robert Thompson, director of the Bleier Centre for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University.

"It is almost to the point that if you don't recognize the figure on stage you must assume they are not legitimate. But what do you do, use your handheld technology to look online for a picture of the man? Maybe that is the next step in combating nefarious acts."
mobile  news  attention  reputation  editing  video  photography  journalism  media  television  public 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Rescuing The Reporters « Clay Shirky
For people who see newspapers as whole institutions that need to be saved, their size (and not the just the dozens and dozens of people on the masthead, but everyone in business and operations as well) makes ideas like Coll’s seems like non-starters — we’re talking about a total workforce in the hundreds, so non-profit conversion seems crazy.

[I]f you start not from total head count but from a list of the people necessary for the production of Jones’ “iron core of news,” a list that, in the Columbia Daily Tribune’s case, would be something like a dozen. (To put this in perspective, KBIA, Columbia’s NPR affiliate, lists a staff of 20.)

Seen in that light, what’s needed for a non-profit news plan to work isn’t an institutional conversion, it’s a rescue operation. There are dozen or so reporters and editors in Columbia, Missouri, whose daily and public work is critical to the orderly functioning of that town, and those people are trapped inside a burning business model.
journalism  media  newspapers  business  news  work  culture  economics  local  future  reporting  writing  nonprofit  corporations  cities 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
WordPress, Twitter, the Elks Club: 10 new routines at a news startup » Nieman Journalism Lab
“I wouldn’t trade this job for anything,” he said. “Mary and I were both reflecting the other day on the fact that if there were an opportunity to become an employee of another entity doing pretty much the same thing, there would be no way.”

“I’m not a very good cog,” Askins went on. “If we had to apply for jobs, I wouldn’t hire me. I would say, ‘That guy’s tasted what it feels like to be his own boss.’”
journalism  media  marketing  newspapers  online  news  local  innovation  leadership  michigan  annarbor 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Good Enough Revolution: When Cheap and Simple Is Just Fine
We get our breaking news from blogs, we make spotty long-distance calls on Skype, we watch video on small computer screens rather than TVs, and more and more of us are carrying around dinky, low-power netbook computers that are just good enough to meet our surfing and emailing needs. The low end has never been riding higher.
marketing  business  technology  economics  video  publishing  society  photography  computers  email  news  media  journalism 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Mashable: 12 Things Newspapers Should Do to Survive
This list is not a comprehensive one, but these are some of the things that newspaper leaders should be considering. And though print itself may not survive, the organizations behind them provide value to a democratic society, often covering and providing news that blogs with more limited resources can’t always dig up.
media  journalism  newspapers  social  business  online  news  community  mobile  future 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Introducing GrowthSpur - Recovering Journalist
There’s no upfront cost to local sites for a GrowthSpur partnership. Our revenue model is a service fee on the advertising revenue we help you with. In other words, we make money if you make money.

How much money? We believe, based on our research and experience, that a well-run, sophisticated local site can bring in more than $100,000 a year in revenue from advertising, e-commerce and other sources. GrowthSpur exists to help local entrepreneurs achieve that level of success—and more.
journalism  business  news  media  entrepreneurs  local  online  blogging  marketing 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Is There Really A 'Piracy' Problem For Newspapers? | Techdirt
Like music "piracy" the issue isn't "parasites" or aggregators "free-riding." The problem is the originating sites not adding enough value to make it worthwhile to visit them, rather than using one of these other (still tiny) sites. I've said it before, and I'll say it again: if you're a publisher, and someone paraphrasing your content is enough to keep people away from your site, you're not doing a very good job adding enough value on your site to get folks to visit.
newspapers  news  blogging  copyright  creativity  attention  web  media  journalism 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
A news entrepreneur lives her obsession and makes it pay | Knight Digital Media Center
I left my job as a reporter/blogger/columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News in January 2009. Now I work for myself as a blogger at BargainBabe.com, which helps people save money on everyday expenses. In almost six months of working for myself I’ve learned a few things.
entrepreneurs  media  journalism  blogging  identity  social  business  work  news  marketing 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Eating Up “Food, Inc.” - Nicholas D. Kristof Blog - NYTimes.com
One window into journalism: A good chunk of Friday afternoon was spent chasing one elusive fact. Food, Inc. reported that the number of FDA food safety inspections had fallen from 50,000 in 1972 to 9,164 in 2006. I thought that was a telling statistic and included it in my draft, but I also asked my assistant, Natasha Yefimov, to double-check the figures with the FDA.

The FDA said the figures were wrong — both of them. The FDA acknowledged that the number of inspections had dropped, but said the 1972 figure was 10,610, while the fiscal year 2006 figure was 7,498 domestically and 125 abroad. The FDA said it had no idea where the other numbers could have come from. [...]
nytimes  politics  news  journalism  food  film  cinema  documentary  government 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Adding value in the new news ecosystem « BuzzMachine
The greatest value a news organization can add to this new news ecosystem is to identify, curate, vet, and train people. Ideally, that needs to happen before the big story breaks. But it can even be done outside the country, as I saw CNN do this morning, talking with a Columbia University student from Iran, who knew who was real and was there from her network of family and friends. Of course, even if you know the people you’re listening to, it’s impossible to know whether everything they say is true unless you can verify it yourself. But that’s the point: You can’t.

[...] The larger the network of people a news organization can organize, the better shape it will be in when news breaks, the better it can filter the reports that come – whether from people in that network or in the larger network of people those people know. The more people in the network, the more who can go to the scene of news or research closer to it – the more you can ask for help.
journalism  newspapers  news  internet  twitter  social  editing  media  business  corporations  relationships  friendship  iran 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
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