allaboutgeorge + future   34

The 5 Best Places to Live in 2100 – Future Human – Medium
Many Great Lake cities fit a similar mold: Duluth, Chicago, Cleveland. “Anywhere in the Great Lakes should be OK,” says Keenan.
chicago  cities  climate  climatechange  usa  alaska  russia  future  weather  newyork 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Nest Founder: “I Wake Up In Cold Sweats Thinking, What Did We Bring To The World?”
“I think we have to be very cognizant of the unintended consequences, but also acknowledge them and then design them out–make sure that we are ethically designing,” he says. “This is the slowest technology will ever progress ever again in your life. It’s only speeding up. So what are we going to do as designers to bring that element in all the time?”
technology  design  ethics  future  apple  google  beauty  mobile  business 
july 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Uber, Data Darwinism and the future of work — Tech News and Analysis
The shift from a generation that started out un-connected to one that is growing up connected will result in conflicts, disruption and eventually the redrawing of our societal expectations. The human race has experienced these shifts before — just not at the speed and scale of this shift.
data  culture  future  work  reputation  identity  power  politics 
march 2013 by allaboutgeorge
The Indiepocalypse - Waxy.org
Artists of all kinds want to focus on making art, but not if it means giving up a large financial stake in their work, exclusive rights to their work, or a loss of creative control.
indie  music  future  art  creativity  money  copyright  culture  media 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and the Terrifying Truth About New Technology - WSJ.com
I'm not saying you have to keep up. But at the moment you choose to stop growing, your world will begin to shrink. You'll be able to communicate with fewer people, especially the young. You will only see reruns. You will not understand how to pay for things. The outside world will become a frightening and unpredictable place.
As they say, the only constant is change.
Each new generation builds on the work of the previous one, gaining new perspective. New verbs are introduced. We Google strange and dangerous places. We tweet mindlessly to the cosmos. We Facebook our own grandmothers.

I, for one, don't want to be left behind.
social  technology  internet  psychology  culture  innovation  attention  youth  twitter  foursquare  aging  memory  future 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Eleven Brands to Watch in 2011 - Allen Adamson - BrandSimple - Forbes
Last and absolutely not least, especially in this age of transparency, when assessing a brand’s staying power, I take into consideration whether it practices what it preaches. Is it authentic? Consumers want to know the who, what and why behind the brands they buy and they have the digital ways and means to find out. They want the genuine article, literally and figuratively, and any brand that isn’t what it claims to be can expect to feel the results.
marketing  future  technology  politics  transparency  business 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Three signs your newsroom isn’t ready to cross the digital divide | Knight Digital Media Center
I am startled these days to hear that some newsrooms are still doing digital as an add-on to their print operation. While I get that the print newspaper is still the cash cow (albeit one that is slimming down), newsrooms that want to have a future need to get cracking on building for a digital future. That may mean shoving aside many vestiges of print times now gone.
newspapers  online  news  future  leadership  technology  mobile  media  journalism 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Internet Founder Tim Berners-Lee Details 4 Concerns About Future of Mobile Web (Nokia World 2010)
[...] The last point also involved a project in which Berners-Lee is involved: providing Web access to the 80% of the world that doesn't go online. He works on this issue through the foundation at webfoundation.org, which examines the challenges in this area. Surprisingly, lack of signal with which to log onto the Web is not the main thing holding back the spread of the Web. 80% of the world has access to the Web, but, for some reason, chooses not to use it.

The cost of data is partially to blame in many cases for this, and for those who cannot afford data plans through their carriers, they're limited to SMS for sharing information. But SMS is very constraining, says Berners-Lee. What's needed instead are better, more low-cost data plans for mobile phones. [...]
future  internet  location  mobile  privacy  web  nokia  design  communication  ethics 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.: Google and the Search for the Future - WSJ.com
Let's say you're walking down the street. Because of the info Google has collected about you, "we know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are." Google also knows, to within a foot, where you are. Mr. Schmidt leaves it to a listener to imagine the possibilities: If you need milk and there's a place nearby to get milk, Google will remind you to get milk. It will tell you a store ahead has a collection of horse-racing posters, that a 19th-century murder you've been reading about took place on the next block.

Says Mr. Schmidt, a generation of powerful handheld devices is just around the corner that will be adept at surprising you with information that you didn't know you wanted to know. "The thing that makes newspapers so fundamentally fascinating—that serendipity—can be calculated now. We can actually produce it electronically," Mr. Schmidt says.
android  google  location  mobile  privacy  search  seo  future  marketing 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The future is now at MIT Media Lab | Geek Gestalt - CNET News
"How predictable are people? We are using credit card transaction data to look at how patterns of human behavior change over time and space, and with which macroeconomic features these changes correlate. How does spending/merchant composition evolve as a region gets bigger/richer/more economically diverse? Do network features help to predict economic ones?"
future  technology  mit  media  research  massachusetts  economics 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
It's Time to Prepare for the End of the Web as We Know It - Advertising Age - Steve Rubel
Mobile devices, by their nature, force users to become more mission-oriented. As more internet consumption shifts to gadgets, it's increasingly becoming an app world and we just live in it. Innovation, fun, simplicity and single-purpose utility will rule while grandiose design and complexity will fall by the wayside.

It won't be enough just to build branded mobile applications that repurpose content across all of the different platforms. That's like newspapers taking the print experience and replicating it on the web as they tried back in the 1990s. Rather, we will need to rethink, remix and repackage information for an entirely different modality than platforms of yore.
computing  design  digital  future  internet  marketing  media  mobile  social  socialnetworking  strategy 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The real reason why Steve Jobs hates Flash - Charlie's Diary
If you're using an iPad in 2015, my bet is that you won't bother to have home broadband; you'll just have data on demand wherever you are. You won't bother yourself about backups, because your data is stored in Apple's cloud. You won't need to bother about software updates because all that stuff will simply happen automatically in the background, without any fuss: nor will worms or viruses or malware be allowed. You will, of course, pay a lot more for the experience than your netbook-toting hardcore microsofties — but you won't have to worry about your antivirus software breaking your computer, either. Because you won't have a "computer" in the current sense of the word. You'll just be surrounded by a swarm of devices that give you access to your data whenever and however you need it.
apple  future  technology  ipad  flash  google  iphone  internet 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Going on the record: Civic engagement is for journalists, too! | Knight Digital Media Center
My closing thought for this series is: Civic engagement really IS for journalists, too. We’re definitely affected by government policy and transparency. We have legitimate interests. And if we don’t speak up in civic processes, on the record, our views won’t really count.

So put aside any cultural qualms about “getting involved.” This is a story journalists are living and working, not just covering. This is our story. If we don’t claim a leading role, we’ll be relegated to the background. Ultimately, communities would pay the price for our reticence.
journalism  media  future  politics  government  transparency  activism  newspapers 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Both Sides Of The Table: App is Crap (why Apple is bad for your health)
am betting that the future is “the mobile web” not the “the mobile app.” There will always be some apps that have reasons to be native on devices but I am betting that serious innovation will happen on mobile browsers and that the future will so most apps folded into the cloud. We’ve already seen it once in the PC era. It’s the best thing for our health. We can build for one primary browser (like we do for Firefox on the desktop today) and then figure out how to get the rest working with whatever Microsoft builds.

It will be 3-5 years before this transition takes place. Much money will be gained and lost in this period. And somebody will win in the transition. Wise companies will plan for this “great porting” to take place. Unfortunately it won’t be in the next 3 years so we have to live through this temporary era.
media  social  business  technology  web  mobile  apple  google  future  software  iphone  android 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
A Plea to All Creatives: Stop Going to Work | Duffy Point of View | Fast Company
Now that we have the ability to dial up, to log in, to upload notes, and download drafts from almost anywhere, we also need to learn the power of powering off and shutting down to charge up, sometimes for a few hours, sometimes for a few weeks.
design  creativity  environment  future  nature  work  creative  inspiration  office  sustainability 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Rescuing The Reporters « Clay Shirky
For people who see newspapers as whole institutions that need to be saved, their size (and not the just the dozens and dozens of people on the masthead, but everyone in business and operations as well) makes ideas like Coll’s seems like non-starters — we’re talking about a total workforce in the hundreds, so non-profit conversion seems crazy.

[I]f you start not from total head count but from a list of the people necessary for the production of Jones’ “iron core of news,” a list that, in the Columbia Daily Tribune’s case, would be something like a dozen. (To put this in perspective, KBIA, Columbia’s NPR affiliate, lists a staff of 20.)

Seen in that light, what’s needed for a non-profit news plan to work isn’t an institutional conversion, it’s a rescue operation. There are dozen or so reporters and editors in Columbia, Missouri, whose daily and public work is critical to the orderly functioning of that town, and those people are trapped inside a burning business model.
journalism  media  newspapers  business  news  work  culture  economics  local  future  reporting  writing  nonprofit  corporations  cities 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Mashable: 12 Things Newspapers Should Do to Survive
This list is not a comprehensive one, but these are some of the things that newspaper leaders should be considering. And though print itself may not survive, the organizations behind them provide value to a democratic society, often covering and providing news that blogs with more limited resources can’t always dig up.
media  journalism  newspapers  social  business  online  news  community  mobile  future 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Salon.com Books | How to go viral
The editor of the Washington Post never knew before which individual stories in the paper were generating interest. He just knew the whole thing sold X number of copies. But with the Internet you have all this granular information about where your readers are coming from and which stories they pick. You can't help but use that information in how you decide to present yourself or how you decide what to write or what to create in the future. And that to me is the way that this kind of marketing mind-set unavoidably creeps into Internet culture.
newspapers  journalism  web  online  marketing  information  future  internet  culture  business 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
MediaShift . Kicking Ink: The Struggles of a Print Newspaper Unsubscriber | PBS
I will be giving regular updates on my life without the print newspaper on my Twitter feed, and will let you know if I backslide when they make me a seriously cheap offer for newspaper delivery.

In the meantime, tell me your own experiences "kicking ink" and how it's changed your life (or not).
newspapers  journalism  media  future  sanfrancisco  hearst  amazon  twitter 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Why journalists deserve low pay | csmonitor.com
The demise of the news business can be halted, but only if journalists commit to creating real value for consumers and become more involved in setting the course of their companies.
media  journalism  newspapers  business  news  economics  future  public 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Root Of The Matter: Emily Bell on The Future of Journalism
Unlike net-culture visionary Clay Shirky, though, Emily doesn't think that print journalism has no future. Print will remain an important part of reaching the audience - but it will not be the primary conduit for journalism in ten years' time. Instead, going by the 'clues' we can pick up from the way journalism is changing today, journalism in ten years will have some or all of the following characteristics:
via:pkynes  journalism  newspapers  media  public  social  future 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The New Normal - Richard Florida
If the Pew data are accurate, it's not tech-driven consumption - less than a third (31 percent) of those surveyed consider high-speed internet a necessity, and just 4 percent say they need an iPod.

But there are many things that are not asked about, as Salmon notes, like " intangibles,'" or spending on personal development (education, learning), higher-quality food, exercise, health-care, green products, or a cleaner environment.
environment  urban  future  economy  shopping  marketing  business  cities  money  education  food  health 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Can the Statusphere Save Journalism?
If you are a journalist, it’s now your responsibility to create a dedicated tribe that supports, shares, and responds to your work and personal interaction in both the Statusphere and also at the point of origin. It’s the only way to build a valuable and portable community around you and what you represent.
media  journalism  newspapers  business  news  internet  social  socialnetworking  communication  twitter  facebook  future  newspaper 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
OJR: Robert Niles: No one owns the news
They got used to owning the means of communication in the past, and came to believe that history entitles them to own the means of communication in the future. Every moment and dollar that Murdoch, the AP and the newspaper industry spend pursuing that false entitlement is a moment and dollar wasted. And the news industry no longer has any money, or time, to waste.
newspapers  google  innovation  ap  media  journalism  future  business  corporations 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Atlantic Online | January 2009 Unbound | When No News Is Bad News | James Warren
“People do awful things to each other. But it’s worse in places where everybody is kept in the dark. Information is light. Information, in itself, about anything, is light.”
journalism  newspapers  writing  business  news  future  innovation  information  playwriting 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Is There Life After Newspapers? | American Journalism Review
Of the people who volunteered their old newspaper salary, only 2 percent made less than $20,000 a year. Of the people who gave me their new salaries, that number shot up to 17 percent. The age of those at the bottom of the salary scale has changed surprisingly as well. The median age of those who made less than $20,000 at their old newspaper job was 24. The median age of those now making less than $20,000 is 48.

Here's another surprise: While the overwhelming majority – 85 percent – say they miss working at a paper, they are often happier in their new jobs. Sixty-two percent tell us they had been satisfied in their old newspaper jobs; 78 percent report being satisfied in their new jobs. (The bus driver and liquor store clerk are not finding much job satisfaction, however.)

So it's safe to say there is life after newspapers. But it's not always the life the journalists had expected.
journalism  newspapers  business  news  jobs  career  future  work  media  aging  money 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Journalistopia » 10 Things Online Editors can do to Save Their Jobs | Danny Sanchez
"It’s a tumultuous time in our industry, and few things are certain. However, it’s a good bet that boosting your online media skills will increase your likelihood of keeping your job or getting an even better one." (h/t @karimamara)
online  internet  journalism  future  web  jobs  media 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Paul Graham: Could VC be a Casualty of the Recession?
There is a founder community just as there's a VC community. They all know one another, and techniques spread rapidly between them. If one tries a new programming language or a new hosting provider and gets good results, 6 months later half of them are using it. And the same is true for funding. The current generation of founders want to raise money from VCs, and Sequoia specifically, because Larry and Sergey took money from VCs, and Sequoia specifically. Imagine what it would do to the VC business if the next hot company didn't take VC at all.

VCs think they're playing a zero sum game. In fact, it's not even that. If you lose a deal to Benchmark, you lose that deal, but VC as an industry still wins. If you lose a deal to None, all VCs lose.
business  money  finance  future  economy  economics  capitalism  entrepreneurs  technology 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Deuzeblog: The People Formerly Known as the Employers
"Journalists today have to fight with their employers to keep the little protections they still have, and do so in a cultural context of declining trust and credibility in the eyes of audiences (the few "audiences" that still exist given the Rosen formula), a battle for hearts and minds that they have to wage without support from those who they traditionally relied on: their employers."
media  journalism  newspapers  relationships  work  power  theory  future  outsourcing  globalization  labor  unions  diy  news  business  corporations 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Dorian Lynskey talks to Mike Skinner of the Streets | Music | The Guardian
"The only thing that we're ever doing is telling ourselves a story. The ability to think into the future, consider the past, handle the present, is everything we're doing all the time."
songwriting  story  future  uk  music 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Wired Magazine: Novelist Neal Stephenson Once Again Proves He's the King of the Worlds
"I could never get that idea, the notion that society in general is becoming aliterate, out of my head. People who write books, people who work in universities, who work on big projects for a long time, are on a diverging course from the rest of society. Slowly, the two cultures just get further and further apart."
literature  libarry  writing  reading  books  fiction  culture  science  history  society  academia  education  philosophy  interview  sciencefiction  time  future 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Recovering Journalist: What Will Happen When the Presses Go Silent?
"[...] Sure. It will still have its various corporate headquarters, beautiful architecture and parks, international airport, pro sports teams, a thriving music scene, opera, theater, good restaurants, great neighborhoods and all of the other things that make up a major city. It just won't have its old-fashioned daily newspaper. [...]"
newspapers  journalism  media  business  news  web  economics  local  economy  future  cities 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge

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