allaboutgeorge + economy   22

It’s Official: Aardvark Books Will Close in January - October 30, 2018 - SF Weekly
Aardvark’s impending closure marks the end of another independent bookstore in San Francisco. There are about 57 left in the city, according to the city’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development, a figure that includes comic-book shops, museum gift shops, and retailers with small book selections
sanfrancisco  books  business  reading  economics  economy  jobs  work  culture  bayarea 
26 days ago by allaboutgeorge
BBC - Travel - Why no-one speaks Indonesia's language
Bahasa Indonesia was adopted to make communication easier across the vast Indonesian archipelago, but its simplicity has only created new barriers.
indonesia  language  identity  speech  trade  economy  asia 
july 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Meet the five urban Chinas
China’s unprecedented urbanization ensures that its cities will collectively shape and define national trends related to infrastructure, technology, and economic growth. And because those cities loom large on the world’s economic stage, their continued evolution will help dictate key global economic, social, and environmental outcomes.
news  china  asia  economy  cities  urban 
june 2018 by allaboutgeorge
California Über Alles | Ann Friedman
"Believe me, I understand the temptation to separate yourself: it’s true that I am different from the people I grew up with who chose to stay in Iowa. Part of that difference is, now, an economic and cultural advantage. So I have a dual responsibility: to see that California actually makes good on its professed values, and to ensure that those values incorporate the rest of America. Refusing to rationalize elite neglect is the real rebellion."
california  usa  president  politics  iowa  economy  jobs  work  behavior 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
How bicycling will save the economy (if we let it) | Grist
The bicycle economy, unlike its fancier cousin transit-oriented development, is not about new development or raising property values. It's about bettering our existing communities. It's about making cities and suburbs that are built on an automotive scale navigable, instead, by human power. It's about providing the basics to everyone, in their neighborhood, now -- and along with that the choice to opt for that $3,000 to $12,000 yearly rebate.

There aren't very many economic scenarios in this country where everyone wins. But if you had to choose one single thing that could pull our neighborhoods, towns, and cities out of this murky pit of a recession, you'd do well to bet on the humble bicycle.
bicycling  transportation  transit  health  economy  diy 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Chalmers Johnson, author of Blowback; The Sorrows of Empire, Dead at 79 | CommonDreams.org
In one of my fondest memories of Chalmers and Sheila Johnson at their home with their then Russian blue cats, MITI and MOF, named after the two engines of Japan's political economy -- Chal railed against the journal, Foreign Affairs, which he saw as a clap trap of statist conventionalism. He decided he had had enough of the journal and of the organization that published it, the Council on Foreign Relations. So, Chalmers called the CFR and told the young lady on the phone to cancel his membership.

The lady said, "Professor Johnson, I'm sorry sir. No one cancels their membership in the Council in Foreign Relations. Membership is for life. People are canceled when they die."

Chalmers Johnson, not missing a beat, said "Consider me dead."
foreign  empire  military  economy  japan  news  politics  power  geography  books  nonfiction  obituaries 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Op-Ed Contributor - How to End the Great Recession - NYTimes.com
Policies that generate more widely shared prosperity lead to stronger and more sustainable economic growth — and that’s good for everyone. The rich are better off with a smaller percentage of a fast-growing economy than a larger share of an economy that’s barely moving. That’s the Labor Day lesson we learned decades ago; until we remember it again, we’ll be stuck in the Great Recession.
economy  money  work  jobs  usa  power  economics 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
io9: China Miéville explains theology, magic, and why JJ Abrams hates you
I don't have any fantastic insight, but I think it's simply that cities to varying degrees are amazing palimpsests of history and cultures. They're coagulated together, a mixing of social norms. I like the temporal dislocation of cities, where you get 17th century buildings next to 21st buildings in London. The world is divided between people who like fractured mixed up stuff, and those who like clean aesthetic totality. I'm more the former.

The majority of humanity now live in cities. They are the site of most political and financial drivers - that's just a fact of economy. They are the site of this kind of chaotic aggregation of ideas that's going to translate into a sensation of the fantastic. That's why fantastic city fiction is so strong – it's about translating enchantment into a modern urban environment.
cities  urban  geography  population  fiction  economy  writing  sciencefiction  history  architecture 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Articles: Grind to Get It
"When my music starts moving forward, it's helping me get more and more out the streets. I'm starting to get more show opportunities to supplement my income and take care of my family. There's ways to make money in music; you just have to go about it in different areas, other than selling a solid, physical record."
music  hiphop  internet  economy  media  pitchfork  entertainment  disruption  myspace  social  socialnetworking 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
How Paul Krugman found politics : The New Yorker
Krugman explained that he’d become an economist because of science fiction. When he was a boy, he’d read Isaac Asimov’s “Foundation” trilogy and become obsessed with the central character, Hari Seldon. Seldon was a “psychohistorian”—a scientist with such a precise understanding of the mechanics of society that he could predict the course of events thousands of years into the future and save mankind from centuries of barbarism. He couldn’t predict individual behavior—that was too hard—but it didn’t matter, because history was determined not by individuals but by laws and hidden forces. “If you read other genres of fiction, you can learn about the way people are and the way society is,” Krugman said to the audience, “but you don’t get very much thinking about why are things the way they are, or what might make them different. What would happen if ?”
economics  politics  newyorker  interview  economy  writing  finance  sciencefiction  history 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
NYC food blogger Cathy Erway ate in for a year - NYPOST.com
“When you’re cooking for yourself, you don’t need a lot of stuff. You just need a good knife, creativity and a willingness to eat whatever you might mess up.”
food  creativity  cheap  blogging  nyc  economy  relationships  community 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
What 2010 Will Be Like: Don't Bank On It (Essay by Chris Gardner, author of "The Pursuit of Happyness") - Speakeasy - WSJ
In case you missed it I’ll say it again in BIG BOLD LETTERS, CASH IS KING!

The only reason to go to a bank is to get a toaster! Do they still give those?

Happy New Year!
business  finance  money  jobs  work  economics  economy  happiness 
january 2010 by allaboutgeorge
At Bloomberg L.P., a Modest Strategy to Rule the World - NYTimes.com
For many years, Bloomberg viewed news as little more than an added service for Wall Street traders. To that end, Mr. Winkler demanded short, direct articles. He ordered reporters to avoid adverbs and adjectives, along with “but” and “however,” which he said muddled the clarity of sentences.
writing  technology  media  business  style  language  english  economy 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The New Normal - Richard Florida
If the Pew data are accurate, it's not tech-driven consumption - less than a third (31 percent) of those surveyed consider high-speed internet a necessity, and just 4 percent say they need an iPod.

But there are many things that are not asked about, as Salmon notes, like " intangibles,'" or spending on personal development (education, learning), higher-quality food, exercise, health-care, green products, or a cleaner environment.
environment  urban  future  economy  shopping  marketing  business  cities  money  education  food  health 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Emily Achenbaum: Reporter turned 'farmer housewife' -- chicagotribune.com
I'm leaving to see how self-sufficient I can be. I'm going to try growing our own vegetables, learn how to can and preserve them, and shop locally for everything else. We're going to see how little we can buy and how much we can reduce our use of electricity. I'll be taking care of our home, working on some personal writing projects and freelance assignments, devoting my extra time to volunteer organizations I care about, and shifting to a slower pace of life I hope to find more satisfying.
journalism  simplicity  economy  writing  volunteering  food  chicago  illinois 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
You're Fired—but Stay in Touch - BusinessWeek
Alumni networks follow a tenet of the knowledge economy: Personal connections transcend corporate boundaries. Already, office workers routinely Twitter and share Facebook status updates with long lists of "friends" that often include business rivals and former colleagues. With their alumni networks, corporations attempt to dissolve those boundaries themselves, establishing for each company a broad network of people who can keep in touch throughout their careers to benefit from each other's knowledge and contacts. Some companies mix alumni with current employees; others keep them apart.
jobs  work  business  corporations  twitter  facebook  friendship  economy  social 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Chicago Reader | What's Black and White and Dead All Over?: Notes on journalism’s past, present, and future prompted by the Chicago Journalism Town Hall | By Whet Moser
Do the math. If you buy the Creative Loafing chain, which owns the Reader, you get Rolodexes, a bunch of dated computers, dated software, and a name. Essentially you’re buying a logo, a URL, some archived content, and a giant fucking IOU.

So, sayeth this smart person: it’s much cheaper to let them die and hire the people, who have the knowledge and the contacts and who actually represent the name. (If you want to be all Web 2.0 about it, call the new thing the Rdr or the Twib, though I guess you won’t have to italicize it. We do not put on airs in the glorious future.)
media  journalism  blogging  ethics  google  blogs  chicago  economy  newspapers 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Paul Graham: Could VC be a Casualty of the Recession?
There is a founder community just as there's a VC community. They all know one another, and techniques spread rapidly between them. If one tries a new programming language or a new hosting provider and gets good results, 6 months later half of them are using it. And the same is true for funding. The current generation of founders want to raise money from VCs, and Sequoia specifically, because Larry and Sergey took money from VCs, and Sequoia specifically. Imagine what it would do to the VC business if the next hot company didn't take VC at all.

VCs think they're playing a zero sum game. In fact, it's not even that. If you lose a deal to Benchmark, you lose that deal, but VC as an industry still wins. If you lose a deal to None, all VCs lose.
business  money  finance  future  economy  economics  capitalism  entrepreneurs  technology 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Recovering Journalist: What Will Happen When the Presses Go Silent?
"[...] Sure. It will still have its various corporate headquarters, beautiful architecture and parks, international airport, pro sports teams, a thriving music scene, opera, theater, good restaurants, great neighborhoods and all of the other things that make up a major city. It just won't have its old-fashioned daily newspaper. [...]"
newspapers  journalism  media  business  news  web  economics  local  economy  future  cities 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Gay marriage may be a gift to California's economy - Los Angeles Times
"[G]ay weddings could provide a $370-million boost to the state economy. That estimate presumes that about half of California's 92,000 same-sex couples will tie the knot, multiplied by $8,040 [...]"
politics  marriage  law  gender  gay  california  economy  ritual 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge

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