allaboutgeorge + culture   158

Remembering Buzzcocks’ Pete Shelley, The First Sensitive Punk | Pitchfork
“There isn't any implied gender in our songs now because we think it's boring singing about one thing when it could apply to both sexes,” Shelley told the music paper Sounds in 1977. “Our songs are bisexual."
music  culture  songwriting  bisexual  creativity  rock  indie  uk 
yesterday by allaboutgeorge
The Queer Generation Gap
This is an acknowledgment of that resentment, of the eye rolling and the snickering with which we respond to the youth (ah, youth!). In the end we are not judging you for being empowered. We are judging ourselves for not being empowered enough.
queer  lgbt  women  behavior  men  attention  sex  television  relationships  gender  beauty  race  millennials  movies  generationx  magazines  culture  internet  queerselflove  identity  aging  power 
16 days ago by allaboutgeorge
We are bearing witness to a profound moment in black culture, Aperture shows - Los Angeles Times
“First, in general, just even the idea of storytelling — the aesthetics, the accent, and the structure of storytelling still has to operate in the empire of this Eurocentric America. America is really European aesthetics. In general, the vocabulary of America is a white supremacist vocabulary and Europe lives in America with all of us being the ambassador and emissary of its vocabulary. My struggle is not only what I want to tell, but it is the very form of storytelling that I am in constant struggle with.”
storytelling  culture  black  african  aesthetics  media  magazines  photography  photojournalism  socialmedia 
6 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
How Gordon Parks Became Gordon Parks - The New York Times
He understood the silence of African-American history in terms of the larger story. And he was determined to make sure that his story was told, and the breadth of his story was told from multiple perspectives, from a boy growing up in the Midwest, to someone who had a dream about being a photographer. His life was complex. And it was not one-dimensional, as most people think when they see someone who is black and poor in that time period.
photography  culture  journalism  attention  news  media  black  history  documentary 
9 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Should Art Be a Battleground for Social Justice? - The New York Times
It was called “The Cosby Show,” but it was never really only his (there are lots of unpaid actors and crew members who can attest to that). Those 6,000 or so hours belong as much to the culture and country as they ever did to him. He canceled himself. He was never the show’s legacy. That was always going to be us.
television  reputation  comedy  fiction  acting  social  art  justice  culture  music 
9 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
'High Fidelity' Sequel: Nick Hornby Reveals What Would Happen | Hollywood Reporter
The arts are the most elaborate and most precise social network ever invented, but if it's going to work properly, you have to get out of the house sometimes and show who you are and what you love. You have to go to shows and galleries and bookstores, you have to ask for what you want out loud. And this expression of taste must involve an impulse that, at its heart, is anti-democratic: Somewhere you have to believe that what you like is better than what all those other losers like.
arts  books  music  aesthetics  criticism  beauty  social  socialnetworking  culture 
10 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Teju Cole on turning his photography into music with jazz pianist and fellow polymath Vijay Iyer
I take notes at the time of being in places. I take a lot of photographs. You never know until you develop your film whether that idea worked. If I photograph a shining Mediterranean full of boats, it could be a perfectly banal picture or it could work. It might just have enough tension in it. I don’t know for weeks and months after I develop the film whether something I’ve done retains its charge. And I don’t know of the many things I’ve jotted down which one is worth writing up more fully. It’s not about text or image coming first. It’s about being attentive — about having both pieces come together like magnets.
art  beauty  media  music  culture  photography  attention  curation 
11 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
Awkwafina, Cultural Appropriation, and Who Owns the Blaccent
It is not by accident that people in power acquire cachet and adoration (and more power) when they don facsimile costumes of the people kept from power. And yet, power doesn’t often propagate itself so plainly in popular culture. We see its influence in what ends up valued and not valued, but more often, appropriation goes undetected.
asianamerican  identity  black  voice  movies  film  power  community  culture 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Charting the Charts / Observable
Something happened around 2000 that increased the homogeneity of the Billboard Top 10. The article explores some ideas, which include a change in the way record sales were tabulated, the dominance of a few producers and the increased prevalence of digital music-making. More recently, however, the charts have seen the return of some musical diversity.
data  popmusic  songwriting  code  culture  BillboardHot100  music  radio 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
More synthetic bamboo! The greatest preset sounds in pop music | Music | The Guardian
“Whether a pop classic or a royalty-free instrumental from YouTube, collage, rewriting, quotations, sometimes thieving a melody – all that is at the heart of a thousand songs that I love. Debate about the purity of creation is void; we live in a society that spits and digests, and pop music is an impure space. That’s precisely why I love it.”
music  culture  software  creativity  creativecommons  pop  popmusic 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
A Generation Grows Up in China Without Google, Facebook or Twitter - The New York Times
“Our findings suggest that censorship in China is effective not only because the regime makes it difficult to access sensitive information, but also because it fosters an environment in which citizens do not demand such information in the first place”
marketing  google  power  socialnetworking  censorship  asia  capitalism  internet  identity  attention  china  twitter  corporations  culture 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Unlearning Woody Allen | Jewish Currents
It’s a cop-out to say that the heart wants what it wants. We have to ask ourselves who taught the heart what it wants, and whether it’s capable of wanting something more.
film  cinema  relationships  feminism  writing  creativity  culture  power 
march 2018 by allaboutgeorge
A Conversation With Dave Eggers and Mokhtar Alkhanshali About 'The Monk of Mokha'
One day I walked into a specialty coffee shop and had a cup of naturally processed coffee from Ethiopia’s Yirgacheffe region. I tasted blueberries, honeysuckle, and it had a sweet lingering aftertaste. The barista spoke to me about where it was grown, the elevation, varietal, how it was processed — but most of all, how their direct relationship to these growers make it possible for the farmers to make more money and live a better life. That part of it really became my entry point into the world of coffee.
coffee  drinking  africa  food  farming  culture  writing  nonfiction  books 
february 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Is Streetwear the New Americana? - Fashionista
"There is a lot of interesting variations because this country is not monocultural or monotonic," says Clark. "That's what has been fascinating about this country in the last 100 years. It has been truly multicultural, multiethnic and multiracial and that is also embedded in different takes in Americana."
fashion  usa  sports  style  culture  ethnicity  race  power 
july 2017 by allaboutgeorge
I Wish I Had Videos of My Dad's Accent - Father's Day Essay
The last remaining evidence of my father's voice, the final thing that roots him and his existence in my brain, will eventually cease to exist–just like VHS tapes, and the accent he spoke with, and my memories of him, too.
language  speech  parenting  memory  technology  culture  curation  family  english 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Uber, Data Darwinism and the future of work — Tech News and Analysis
The shift from a generation that started out un-connected to one that is growing up connected will result in conflicts, disruption and eventually the redrawing of our societal expectations. The human race has experienced these shifts before — just not at the speed and scale of this shift.
data  culture  future  work  reputation  identity  power  politics 
march 2013 by allaboutgeorge
The Indiepocalypse - Waxy.org
Artists of all kinds want to focus on making art, but not if it means giving up a large financial stake in their work, exclusive rights to their work, or a loss of creative control.
indie  music  future  art  creativity  money  copyright  culture  media 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and the Terrifying Truth About New Technology - WSJ.com
I'm not saying you have to keep up. But at the moment you choose to stop growing, your world will begin to shrink. You'll be able to communicate with fewer people, especially the young. You will only see reruns. You will not understand how to pay for things. The outside world will become a frightening and unpredictable place.
As they say, the only constant is change.
Each new generation builds on the work of the previous one, gaining new perspective. New verbs are introduced. We Google strange and dangerous places. We tweet mindlessly to the cosmos. We Facebook our own grandmothers.

I, for one, don't want to be left behind.
social  technology  internet  psychology  culture  innovation  attention  youth  twitter  foursquare  aging  memory  future 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Looking for a 'Hangover' cure
Here's how it might work: Get together a group of smart, influential tastemakers -- journalists, critics, student leaders, bloggers. Have them select five indie Asian American creators -- writers, filmmakers, musicians -- from an open call that includes anyone with a brand-new, brashly different and commercially viable product.

Send these creators on a collective national barnstorming tour of the college campuses with the biggest Asian American student representation -- reading, performing, speaking, and showing their work and their potential. The costs of the tour would be covered by student organization funds and corporate sponsors.

Here's the kicker: Although attendance at these events would be free, every attendee would have to purchase one of the five products these artists are promoting on the spot, while enrolling in an online community that gives the artists long-term engagement with their consumers.
film  movies  art  culture  asian  asianamerican  race  ethnicity  attention  creativity 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Japan crises echo its pop culture disaster narratives - latimes.com
"That's sort of the key to understanding what's going on in Japan," LaMarre said, "this kind of sense that obviously you want to be bailed out, you want to be rebuilt, you want things reconstructed. But at the same time there's a desire for a definite break with the past.... And as we all know, Japan's been having a lot of economic problems for a long time, and there's growing problems with immigration, unemployment, aging. And so there's a strange sense of not knowing whether to want things to go back to the way they were or to really have change through these catastrophes."
japan  disaster  tsunami  earthquake  culture  books  movies 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Francis Fukuyama’s New History of Human Social Structures - NYTimes.com
Much of what I read here reminded me strongly of Kim Stanley Campbell's "The Years of Rice and Salt."
books  nonfiction  science  behavior  power  culture  research 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
High on the Stones by Dan Chiasson | The New York Review of Books
I am not making an original point, but it cannot be reiterated enough: the experience of making and taking in culture is now, for the first time in human history, a condition of almost paralyzing overabundance. For millennia it was a condition of scarcity; and all the ways we regard things we want but cannot have, in those faraway days, stood between people and the art or music they needed to have: yearning, craving, imagining the absent object so fully that when the real thing appears in your hands, it almost doesn’t match up. Nobody will ever again experience what Keith Richards and Mick Jagger experienced in Dartford, scrounging for blues records. The Rolling Stones do not happen in any other context: they were a band based on craving, impersonation, tribute: white guys from England who worshiped black blues and later, to a lesser extent, country, reggae, disco, and rap.
culture  culturalstudies  memoir  writing  nonfiction  books  music  rock  blues  youtube  social 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I Will Check My Phone At Dinner And You Will Deal With It
Is part of it antisocial? Sure. Can it lead to distractions if you read a work-related email that you need to respond to? Of course. But this is the way the world works now. We’re always connected and always on call. And some of us prefer it that way.
dinner  food  mobile  technology  friendship  relationships  culture  attention  presence  social 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I, Reader by Alexander Chee - The Morning News
The world remains beautiful and terrible at the same time, and either way, I know it doesn’t care what I think or feel about it. There are things to do to help others, and there are things that may never change. But if I learned anything from all of this, it’s my first, oldest lesson as a reader: There is always going to be a book that saves you. There is also a new lesson: You do not know how it will get to you.
writing  attention  books  culture  behavior  fiction  ipad  kindle  reading  nonfiction  relationships 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why spreadable doesn’t equal viral: A conversation with Henry Jenkins » Nieman Journalism Lab
NU: What is spreadable media?

HJ: The concept of spreadable media rests on the distinction between distribution (the top-down spread of media content as captured in the broadcast paradigm) and circulation (a hybrid system where content spreads as a result of a series of informal transactions between commercial and noncommercial participants.) Spreadable media is media which travels across media platforms at least in part because the people take it in their own hands and share it with their social networks.
media  journalism  news  culture  web  socialnetworking  theory  socialmedia  libraries  social  attention  public 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Q&A: The Makers of Islamic iPhone Apps - The Bay Citizen
Q: Do you think technologies like Islamic iPhone apps are modernizing Islam?

AT: No, I wouldn’t say that. Muslims believe that Islam, as a sacred revealed knowledge, is already in a state of perfection and it is the Muslims that need to adapt to the modern world. So what we are doing is taking modern tools and giving people access to sacred knowledge. And I think a lot of Muslims in America have easy access to technology, and these things are, in some sense, adding more value to people’s day. I wouldn’t call it modernizing Islam, but I would say it’s using modern technology to connect people to Islam.
islam  iphone  technology  software  culture 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Lady Robots: The Shape of Things to Come On | The Awl
We didn't make girls perfect; we made them to be what we wanted. If they want to be masters, to live in a world where only one set of desires is valid, they take after us that way. They're still showing us what we want. The key is to want something better. The key is to want something more.
feminism  technology  power  gender  sex  art  beauty  culture 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Am I the last person in America who still adores President Obama? - By Curtis Sittenfeld - Slate Magazine
But when I see Obama on television, I'm unfailingly struck by his intelligence and charisma, by his easygoing humor, by the magnificence of his megawatt smile. He just makes me proud, and perhaps this is where I should admit that if there are two categories of Obama critics—conservatives who never liked the guy and have in some cases become unhinged since he was elected, and centrists or Democrats who voted for him but now feel let down—I suspect that, in the visceral nature of my response to our president, I have more in common with the unhinged nut jobs. By this I mean that my Obama admiration is a kind of emotional inverse of the right-wing Obama antipathy: I can pretend it's all about policy, but in truth, it's much more personal.
culture  social  politics  obama 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
A Culture of Poverty - Ta-Nehisi Coates - Personal - The Atlantic
I suspect that a large part of the problem, when we talk about culture, is an inability to code-switch, to understand that the language of Rohan is not the language of Mordor. I don't say this to minimize culture, to the contrary, I say it to point how difficult it is to get people to discard practices which were essential to them in one world, but hinder their advancement into another. And then there's the fear of that other world, that sense that if you discard those practices, you have discarded some of yourself, and done it in pursuit of a world, that you may not master.
politics  race  culture  poverty  violence  teaching  power  education  identity 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Corner Office - Turn Insecurity Into Strength, Starbucks’ Chief Says - Question - NYTimes.com
People ask me what’s the most important function when you’re starting an organization or setting up the kind of culture and values that are going to endure.

The discipline I believe so strongly in is H.R., and it’s the last discipline that gets funded. Marketing, manufacturing — all these things are important. But more often than not, the head of H.R. does not have a seat at the table. Big mistake.
business  ethics  culture  identity  marketing  starbucks  coffee 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Vocab - Culture - The Atlantic
It's easy to get caught up in how different the music might have been had she stayed. But it's a fool's errand. Lauryn never asked for the burden we heaped on her shoulders, and there's no guarantee that she would have carried it. History is what is, and I have no real complaints about what has become of hip-hop. To the contrary, I'm grateful for those years when I was in love. They changed my life. But off to The Suburbs now, I guess.
hiphop  culture  aesthetics  music  women 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Why I like vicious, anonymous online comments - Internet Culture - Salon.com
When a person comments anonymously, we’re told, they're putting a mask on. But the more time I spend online the more I'm convinced that this analogy gets it backward.

The self that we show in anonymous comments, the fantasy self, the self we see in the mirror when we fantasize about being tough and strong and feared, the face we would present to the world if there were no such thing as consequences: That’s the real us.

The civil self is the mask.
communication  identity  culture  ethics  internet  psychology  blogging  anonymity  moderation  online  media  public 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
When 'Twilight' fandom becomes addiction - latimes.com
"If you take away 'Twilight' and put in a football team, this doesn't look so much different from what guys have been doing for decades," says Baym. "They stay up late at night looking at statistics and playing fantasy football. You could just as easily say they've lost touch with reality or that they're addicted. 'Twilight' is just a story women are engaging with passionately, so people say it's dysfunctional. On the other hand, maybe men's relationship with football is dysfunctional as well."
culture  marriage  movies  fandom  story  identity  relationships  online  internet  men  women  sports 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Inc.com: Why I Sold Zappos by Tony Hsieh
Some board members had always viewed our company culture as a pet project -- "Tony's social experiments," they called it. I disagreed. I believe that getting the culture right is the most important thing a company can do. But the board took the conventional view -- namely, that a business should focus on profitability first and then use the profits to do nice things for its employees. The board's attitude was that my "social experiments" might make for good PR but that they didn't move the overall business forward. The board wanted me, or whoever was CEO, to spend less time on worrying about employee happiness and more time selling shoes.
business  ethics  social  culture 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Magazine Preview - The Data-Driven Life - NYTimes.com
At the center of this personal laboratory is the mobile phone. During the years that personal-data systems were making their rapid technical progress, many people started entering small reports about their lives into a phone. Sharing became the term for the quick post to a social network: a status update to Facebook, a reading list on Goodreads, a location on Dopplr, Web tags to Delicious, songs to Last.fm, your breakfast menu on Twitter. “People got used to sharing,” says David Lammers-Meis, who leads the design work on the fitness-tracking products at Garmin. “The more they want to share, the more they want to have something to share.” Personal data are ideally suited to a social life of sharing. You might not always have something to say, but you always have a number to report.
data  psychology  culture  health  nytimes  sociology  business  productivity  mobile  information 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
M.I.A.: Unlike Lady Gaga, I won't be 'blindfolded with naked men feeding me apples' | Pop & Hiss | Los Angeles Times
We’re past the point in culture of really caring if our pop stars are “authentic” or not, and we derive a lot of genuine pleasure from the sounds and imagery of “faking it.” But M.I.A.’s take underscores a more valid criticism – that even if a star is contrived, at least be contrived to fascinating ends. No one really touches Gaga on red carpet photogenic qualities, and she’s got an undeniable instrument in that voice.
identity  music  aesthetics  marketing  attention  culture  business  power  pop 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Esquire: Roger Ebert: The Essential Man
I believe that if, at the end of it all, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, and something to make ourselves a little happier, that is about the best we can do. To make others less happy is a crime. To make ourselves unhappy is where all crime starts. We must try to contribute joy to the world. That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try. I didn't always know this, and am happy I lived long enough to find it out.
writing  identity  reading  cinema  art  culture  film  movies  criticism  chicago  cancer  entertainment 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Final edition: Twilight of the American newspaper—By Richard Rodriguez (Harper's Magazine)
[...] In the nineteenth-century newspaper, the relationship between observer and observed was reciprocal: the newspaper described the city; the newspaper, in turn, was sustained by readers who were curious about the strangers that circumstance had placed proximate to them. So, I suppose, it is incomplete to notice that the San Francisco Chronicle has become remiss in its obituary department. Of four friends of mine who died recently in San Francisco, not one wanted a published obituary or any other public notice taken of his absence. This seems to me a serious abrogation of the responsibility of living in a city and as good an explanation as any of why newspapers are dying. All four of my friends requested cremation; three wanted their ashes consigned to the obscurity of Nature. Perhaps the cemetery is as doomed in America as the newspaper, and for the same reason: we do not imagine death as a city.

We no longer imagine the newspaper as a city or the city as a newspaper. [...]
media  journalism  newspapers  writing  news  death  obituaries  cities  california  essay  history  sanfrancisco  culture 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Road Movie With Director John Hillcoat - Q&A With The Road Director John Hillcoat - Popular Mechanics
I was nervous about those trees. But I was told how to deal with it: The worst thing to do is run if a tree is falling because you'll lose your bearings. Trees go deceptively so far out that you could cross its line way off in the distance and it'll get you. The experts said if anything happens, the thing to do is just to watch it carefully. You've got seconds. Just watch it, and see where it's going, and then you can sidestep it. I thought I'd pass on that information.
culture  film  geography  movies  cinema  creativity  aesthetics  beauty  neworleans  photography 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
SA Current - Blogs - Straight from the Arizona Gulag: Linda Ronstadt in SA
If this Q & A were a song, it would be called “We Need A Lot More Rancheras (And A Lot Less Rock And Roll).”

And, of course, it would take up a whole album side.
music  interviews  immigration  texas  arizona  mexico  usa  latino  politics  culture  identity 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Finding self in another culture - Sacramento Living - Sacramento Food and Wine, Home, Health | Sacramento Bee
"When an Indian American writer portrays India, a reader will already have seen five other portrayals in other books and inject what they've seen before," she explained. "That leads readers to overlook other aspects of an immigrant experience."
india  writing  fiction  literature  books  sacramento  identity  culture 
november 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Rescuing The Reporters « Clay Shirky
For people who see newspapers as whole institutions that need to be saved, their size (and not the just the dozens and dozens of people on the masthead, but everyone in business and operations as well) makes ideas like Coll’s seems like non-starters — we’re talking about a total workforce in the hundreds, so non-profit conversion seems crazy.

[I]f you start not from total head count but from a list of the people necessary for the production of Jones’ “iron core of news,” a list that, in the Columbia Daily Tribune’s case, would be something like a dozen. (To put this in perspective, KBIA, Columbia’s NPR affiliate, lists a staff of 20.)

Seen in that light, what’s needed for a non-profit news plan to work isn’t an institutional conversion, it’s a rescue operation. There are dozen or so reporters and editors in Columbia, Missouri, whose daily and public work is critical to the orderly functioning of that town, and those people are trapped inside a burning business model.
journalism  media  newspapers  business  news  work  culture  economics  local  future  reporting  writing  nonprofit  corporations  cities 
october 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Luc Sante on Robert Frank’s The Americans - WSJ.com
The overt influence of the book on the young may be on the wane these days, in large part because of the different possibilities and demands of digital photography. Among art photographers there may be more interest in manipulation, narrative, scale and deliberate control of the image. In documentary photography, on the other hand, its influence is deep-rooted and seemingly permanent. "The Americans" might be said to have brought agnosticism to photography; it forcefully introduced doubt, as expressed by asymmetry, overlaps, tilts, radical cropping, out-of-focus foregrounds and the use of massed shadows and pulsing glare. That quality has come to be synonymous with truth-telling, even if it has been abused over the years. Until someone comes up with a transformative new way of taking pictures that can convince us it has an even stronger mimetic relationship to the way we actually see, it is likely to stand as such.
culture  photography  beauty  usa  race  books  aesthetics  identity  travel  documentary  journalism  art 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Rating Attractiveness: Consensus Among Men, Not Women, Study Finds
"As far as we know, this is the first study to investigate whether there are differences in the level of consensus male and female raters have in their attractiveness judgments," Wood says. "These differences have implications for the different experiences and strategies that could be expected for men and women in the dating marketplace."
women  men  relationships  sex  gender  culture  psychology  science  beauty  marketing 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Bruce Handy on Mad Men | vanityfair.com
“I’m not avoiding answering the question, but I’m doing something that I do a lot, which is avoiding saying, ‘I don’t know.’ And that’s from my family—it’s really bad to get caught not knowing something. I hope I’ll know when I get there. When I started the show, when I had the inkling of the idea, I thought, What was it like for people to go through this [historical period]? It wasn’t a loss of innocence, but things really did change. There was some shit falling apart, as much as there was in the 1930s. Hopefully we don’t have to experience that again, but to come out on the other side and, you know, What does Don look like when Kent State happens? I would kind of like to know that.”
television  culture  magazines  1960s  aesthetics  1970s  writing  cable 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Dangerous Resentment - Judith Warner Blog - NYTimes.com
The idea that women with “major educations” are somehow suspect, the desire to smack them down and tell them “to be quiet” is hardly new. At the end of the 19th century, as increasing numbers of women began for the first time to pursue higher education, a campaign began, waged by prominent doctors, among others, against these new unnatural monsters, whose vital energies were being diverted from their wombs to their brains. In the last quarter of the 20th century, feminists were routinely delegitimized as brainy elitists ignorant of and unconcerned with the plight of ordinary women.
identity  social  women  gender  culture  education  feminism  society  discrimination  men 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
BBC NEWS | South Asia | Kabul struggles to get back on song
The original translation of Harabat meant "ruins". But there is another meaning: "dedication". It seems the quarter is living up to its other translation in every sense.
afghanistan  music  identity  war  history  culture  religion  education 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
James Wolcott on Cultural Snobbery | vanityfair.com
In my bohemian days (the exotic reek of incense haunts me still), I owned a jukebox—a huge honker, a neon-trimmed sarcophagus—which I studiously stocked with 45s to showcase the catholicity of my pop sensibility, from the Supremes’ “Up the Ladder to the Roof” to Elton John and Kiki Dee’s “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart,” to Duran Duran’s “Hungry Like the Wolf,” to the Clash’s “(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais.” I was fond of that machine, despite the mockery it inspired, because it was like having a custom-built twin. “Male record collectors seek mastery over a body of music, almost always as a way of establishing a masculine identity,” Krin Gabbard argues in his psychosocial study “Hipsters and Nerds.” (Oh, so that’s what I was doing.) “The collector makes conscious and unconscious connections to the masculine codes in the music, but he also works at acquiring a commanding knowledge that can be carefully deployed in the right surroundings.”
music  social  business  books  technology  culture  pop  movies  publishing  literature  aesthetics  identity  fashion  gender 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Fans overlook Michael Jackson's dark side | U.S. | Reuters
"I think we can multi-task when it comes to our cultural icons," said Jefferson. "We can live simultaneously with their enormous talent, be it a Michael Jackson, or a Marlon Brando or a Judy Garland or an Elvis. And we can live with the knowledge of the enormous damage that they did to themselves, that was done to them, and that they did to other people."
music  business  media  capitalism  marketing  television  cable  rock  race  psychology  identity  culture 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
New York - Sound of the City - From the Voice Archives: Robert Christgau on the Mass Culture Spectacle of Michael Jackson in 1984
The Victory Tour's $30 prices aren't as out of line as they ought to be (Marvin Gaye charged $25 at Radio City--though Bruce's top is $16), but they do seem to keep black kids away, and black kids would have made good company at the Garden. After all, they're the ones who've cared about Michael longest and deepest, who feel his success as more than an exotic accident of statistics and modern communication--and they're also the unnamed potential perpetrators who inspired the tour's massive-to-paranoid security outlay. As delighted as I am to see white America recognize a black heir, I'm not going to think the affection in which he's held means a whole lot racially until it gets generalized a little.
music  reviews  nyc  writing  culture  aesthetics  identity  race  rock  concerts  1980s 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Wired: Know Thyself: Tracking Every Facet of Life, from Sleep to Mood to Pain, 24/7/365
The basic idea of a macroscope is to link myriad bits of natural data into a larger, readable pattern. This means computers on one side and distributed data-gathering on the other. If you want to see the climate, you gather your data with hyperlocal weather stations maintained by amateurs. If you want to see traffic, you collect info from automatic sensors placed on roadways and cars. If you want new insights into yourself, you harness the power of countless observations of small incidents of change—incidents that used to vanish without a trace. And if you want to test an idea about human nature in general, you aggregate those sets of individual observations into a population study.

The macroscope will be to our era of science what the telescope and the microscope were to earlier ones. Its power will be felt even more from the new questions it provokes than from the answers it delivers. [...]
technology  data  information  identity  science  social  culture 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
How To Communicate Securely in Repressive Environments « iRevolution
Nonviolent resistance movements are typically driven by students, i.e., young people, who are increasingly born digital natives. With expanding access to mobile phones, social networking software and online platforms for user-generated content such as blogs, the immediate financial cost of speaking out against repressive regimes is virtually nil. So resistance movements are likely to make even more use of new communication technology and digital media in the future. In fact, they already are.

At the same time, however, the likelihood and consequences of getting caught are high, especially for those political activists without any background or training in digital security. Indeed, recent research by Digital Democracy research suggests that organizational hierarchies are being broken down as youth adopt new technologies. While this empowers them they are also put at risk since they don’t tend to be as consequence-conscious as their adult counterparts.
politics  internet  technology  culture  activism  protest  privacy  security  anonymity  howto  diy  communication  power  censorship 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Salon.com Books | How to go viral
The editor of the Washington Post never knew before which individual stories in the paper were generating interest. He just knew the whole thing sold X number of copies. But with the Internet you have all this granular information about where your readers are coming from and which stories they pick. You can't help but use that information in how you decide to present yourself or how you decide what to write or what to create in the future. And that to me is the way that this kind of marketing mind-set unavoidably creeps into Internet culture.
newspapers  journalism  web  online  marketing  information  future  internet  culture  business 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
More Thoughts On Being PC - Ta-Nehisi Coates
The luxury of being the majority in a democracy is the right to act like other people don't exist. But the world is changing around them and Birnam Wood is on the march.
politics  race  culture  racism  language  power 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
xkcd - A Webcomic - Sledding Discussion
"It depresses me that i'm too old to learn another language fluently. My brain's solidified."
language  technology  culture  humor  comics  education  relationships 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The weird science of stock photography. - By Seth Stevenson - Slate Magazine
While it's fun to ponder which future trends Getty's seers are banking on, it can also be illuminating to learn which sorts of images have been most attractive to their clients in the recent past. Getty's Web site gets more than 3 million unique users each month, all scouring it for purchasable content. Getty gave me lists of the most popular search terms on their database for 2006, 2007, and the first half of 2008. Only three entries showed up in the top 10 on all three lists: business, people, and woman. (Woman climbed from eighth to fifth to first, which Waggoner attributes to the increasing global presence of women in the workplace and thus the increasing global demand for photos and video depicting women in the workplace.)
data  futurism  sociology  design  photography  culture  journalism  media  marketing  information  business  women  work  jobs 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Independent Minds - Andrew Keen - Trouble in Paris
In his latest book, Tribes, Seth Godin, a leading American marketing blogger, confesses to obsessively checking his email at 4.00 am while on holiday in Jamaica. “It took me a long time to figure out why I was so happy to be checking my email in the middle of the night,” he writes. “It had to do with passion. Other than sleeping, there was nothing I’d rather have been doing in that moment.” In Silicon Valley then, work is passion; in Europe, I suspect, passion at 4.00 am is something entirely different.
europe  culture  internet  social  usa  media  france  innovation  business  entrepreneurs 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Guest Columnist - Typing Without a Clue - Op-Ed - NYTimes.com
There was a time when I wanted to be like Sting, the singer, belting out, “Roxanne ...” I guess that’s why we have karaoke, for fantasy night. If only there was such a thing for failed plumbers, politicians or celebrities who think they can write.
writing  books  language  publishing  mccain  politics  music  celebrity  culture  business 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
The World - India Calling - NYTimes.com
"If there is a creative class, in Richard Florida’s phrase, there is also emerging what might be called a fusion class: people positioned to mediate among the multiple societies that claim them."
india  business  globalization  diaspora  creative  immigration  usa  class  culture  society 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
France. Sex. Problem? - NYTimes.com
“Prostitution is the last sexual territory owned by men. Men are in control of pleasure and have the right to buy it. Women do not. A lot of my friends are alone, lonely, divorced. They can’t always reinvent themselves with another man and a new family. So I decided to show a female client of a male escort. She’s not a victim. She is a woman who is in control of her life, her feelings, her sexual pleasure.”
gender  sex  culture  europe  film  society  movies  france  women  men  economics  marketing  books  happiness  feminism 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Op-Ed Contributor - Margare Atwood - A Matter of Life and Debt - NYTimes.com
We are social creatures who must interact for mutual benefit, and — the negative version — who harbor grudges when we feel we’ve been treated unfairly. Without a sense of fairness and also a level of trust, without a system of reciprocal altruism and tit-for-tat — one good turn deserves another, and so does one bad turn — no one would ever lend anything, as there would be no expectation of being paid back. And people would lie, cheat and steal with abandon, as there would be no punishments for such behavior.
money  work  ethics  writing  essay  aesthetics  relationships  psychology  altruism  happiness  crime  behavior  culture  history  economics  literature  sociology  finance  rhetoric 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
William Claxton, Jazz Photographer, Is Dead at 80 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com
"When we started out, there were hardly any other photographers doing this kind of thing because there was no money in it. We started doing it because of the love of photography and the love of jazz."
jazz  photography  culture  music  love  obituaries 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Stephen Fry on the road - Telegraph
"There is one phrase I probably heard more than any other on my travels: 'Only in America!' If you were to hear a Briton say 'Tch! Only in Britain, eh?', it would probably refer to something that was either predictable, miserable, oppressive, dull, bureaucratic, queuey, damp, spoil-sporty or incompetent – or a mixture of all of those. 'Only in America!', on the other hand, always refers to something shocking, amazing, eccentric, wild, weird or unpredictable. Americans are constantly being surprised by their own country. Britons are constantly having their worst fears confirmed about theirs. This seems to be one of the major differences between us."
usa  uk  travel  identity  aesthetics  reputation  politics  culture  humor  books 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Findings - As External Barriers Disappear, Internal Gender Gaps Widen - NYTimes.com
“Humanity’s jaunt into monotheism, agriculturally based economies and the monopolization of power and resources by a few men was ‘unnatural’ in many way. In some ways modern progressive cultures are returning us psychologically to our hunter-gatherer roots. That means high sociopolitical gender equality over all, but with men and women expressing predisposed interests in different domains. Removing the stresses of traditional agricultural societies could allow men’s, and to a lesser extent women’s, more ‘natural’ personality traits to emerge.”
men  women  gender  psychology  health  evolution  research  science  sex  culture  nytimes  nature  poverty 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Laura Barton takes a sceptical look at opera | Music | The Guardian
"I am, surely, exactly the sort of person they are trying to tempt. I spend much of my time listening to music and attending gigs. I will happily spend vast sums on festivals. Yet classical music has always seemed a cold and distant land, set far away across a sea of elitism."
classical  classicalmusic  music  uk  aesthetics  culture  opera 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Wired Magazine: Novelist Neal Stephenson Once Again Proves He's the King of the Worlds
"I could never get that idea, the notion that society in general is becoming aliterate, out of my head. People who write books, people who work in universities, who work on big projects for a long time, are on a diverging course from the rest of society. Slowly, the two cultures just get further and further apart."
literature  libarry  writing  reading  books  fiction  culture  science  history  society  academia  education  philosophy  interview  sciencefiction  time  future 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Off the Shelf - A Journalist in B-School Wonderland - NYTimes.com
“Business schools no longer produce just business leaders. M.B.A.’s determine the lives many of us will lead, the hours we work, the vacations we get, the culture we consume, the health care we receive, and the education provided to our children.”
business  education  harvard  journalism  media  books  newspapers  finance  economics  culture 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Nerve: Ken Mondschein's "History of Single Life"
"So while conservatives might point to the fact that the per-capita divorce rate has dropped 5% since 1980, the fact is, the marriage rate has also dropped 50% since 1970. Divorce rates have fallen simply because less of us are getting married."
divorce  men  marriage  women  relationships  culture  ritual  law 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
About Face: How Plastic Surgery Can Give an Older Woman the Face of a Baby -- New York Magazine
"When I tell her that making the face bigger or 'fatter' seems counterintuitive, she says, 'I know, that’s why no one was doing it twenty years ago.' 'How did you figure it out?' I ask. 'Because I was doing lipo and I don’t like to throw anything away.'"
beauty  women  youth  children  nyc  magazine  art  aesthetics  aging  identity  celebrity  medicine  fashion  health  culture  gender  feminism  surgery 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Abroad - With Flemish Nationalism on the Rise, Belgium Teeters on the Edge - NYTimes.com
“In a global society, nations are less important. It’s a moral question. Does a culture have a right to stand up for itself? More than that: Do unity and nationhood take priority over one’s culture? That’s not just an issue for Belgians but everyone.”
language  europe  france  belgium  netherlands  culture 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Randall Kennedy's "A Note On The Word 'Nigger'" - NPS Ethnography: African American Heritage & Ethnography
"To paper over that term or to constantly obscure it by euphemism is to flinch from coming to grips with racial prejudice that continues to haunt the American social landscape."
language  black  usa  history  culture  thinking  race  racism 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
The Changing Newsroom | Project for Excellence in Journalism (PEJ)
“I feel I’m being catapulted into another world, a world I don’t really understand. It’s scary because things are happening at the speed of light. The sheer speed (of change) has outstripped our ability to understand it all.”
journalism  media  newspapers  reading  research  statistics  work  culture  business  news 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Paul Graham: Cities and Ambition
"A city speaks to you mostly by accident—in things you see through windows, in conversations you overhear. It's not something you have to seek out, but something you can't turn off."
cities  urban  berkeley  nyc  paris  power  sanfrancisco  environment  demographics  culture  community  boston  bayarea  location 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Dave Hill: Gender stereotypes hurt men too | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
"All else being equal, to be born male is to inherit legacies of entitlement that continue to outweigh those bestowed on those born female. Yet the state of maleness carries its own burden of expectations and constraints."
activism  culture  feminism  gender  men  women  identity  society  ritual 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Esquire: Does America Have Any Culture?
"A lack of culture is not our problem. The problem is we've become too effective at distributing that culture -- at the same time, in the same way, and with the same velocity. It all ends up feeling interchangeable, which makes it all marginally irrelevan
culture  usa  culturalstudies  germany  magazines  art 
july 2008 by allaboutgeorge
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