allaboutgeorge + attention + songwriting   9

Baltimore band Wye Oak: Juggling loneliness and aloneness on their new 'Civilian' | Pop & Hiss | Los Angeles Times
“I used to keep a journal," she said, “but I would always forget to carry it around, and my ideas come when I’m out and about. My iPhone, though, is the one thing I have on my person at all times. So when I think of a guitar part or a vocal line or some lyrics, I put them on my iPhone. That way, when I have time to work on songs, I don’t face that blank-page syndrome like I used to. I played back that guitar riff and started singing scat syllables over it.
songwriting  art  iphone  mobile  memory  attention  creativity  technology 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Breaking Down the DNA of a Hit Song - Speakeasy - WSJ
Going the way of long intros, at least in pop, is the ballad. In a field littered with thumping club tracks (see Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite”) and mid-tempo “sex jams,” as Frank calls them, the top-selling ballad was “If I Die Young” by the young country act The Band Perry—which topped out at only No. 59. With only a handful of rock bands represented in the top 100, including Paramore and Neon Trees, rockers vying for crossover success should take cues from prevailing pop trends, Frank says: “Now is not the time to go esoteric or to go heavy. No power ballads, for sure.”

Murphy and Frank also delved into subject matter, breaking lyrics down into some thematic categories. In pop, Frank found that 21% of the top 100 sellers dealt with maneuvering someone into bed (typically from the dancefloor); testifying about love was less common (17%); followed by falling out of love (16%), partying (16%) and sheer boasting (9%).
songwriting  pop  music  writing  attention  research 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
John Doe – Wolf at the door « Americana and Roots Music - No Depression
“So that’s what I aspire to. Having a few of those moments now and then. As you sing more, I find that you’re able to appreciate it more, and you’re able to put yourself in a totally open space so you’re not mentally trying to do something. You’re just letting it happen, which is great. Then you can find those moments, when it’s just happening. It’s not something you can do easily or by will. You just get into it.”
music  songwriting  attention  beauty 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Portrait of the artist: Rufus Wainwright, musician | Culture | The Guardian
What advice would you give a young musician? "Sing your songs in public at least twice a week – even if it's only at weddings and barmitzvahs. The more you do, the quicker you learn which songs travel."
music  songwriting  livemusic  advice  diy  attention  presence 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
For Sade, a Reluctant Return to the Spotlight - NYTimes.com
For Sade, reticence is a matter of both temperament and songwriting strategy. “That’s the trick in a way, like conjuring,” she said. “You’ve got to allow so much to go in there. But it isn’t just your own, because then it’s T.M.I.” — too much information — “and when you listen to the song you’re thinking of the person rather than your own emotions. If it’s too attached to the performer,” she added, “it pushes you away, it’s a bit repulsive. Because that’s theirs — it’s not yours.”
songwriting  music  aesthetics  creativity  writing  identity  attention  relationships 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Restaurants Use Menu Psychology to Entice Diners - NYTimes.com
“We thought long and hard about the psychology because this is a complete relaunch of a restaurant entirely through its menu and through the psychology of the menu,” Mr. Meyer said. “The chefs write the music and the menu becomes the lyrics, and sometimes the music is gorgeous and it’s got the wrong lyrics and the lyrics can torpedo the music.”
music  food  business  psychology  marketing  design  attention  songwriting 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Aimee Mann clicks into a disturbed world | The Japan Times Online
"I'm always interested in the same thing," she says. "I like to write about messed up people who have relationships where the dynamic is strange. People are interesting, and most are fairly disturbed. I don't know anybody who you would call well adjusted. I know people who are flawed and who are trying to improve, and I applaud that." [...]

"I have a lot of compassion for people," she says briskly. "It's not easy being a person. I even feel sorry for giant celebrities. I think it's a tougher gig than people give them credit for." [...]

"I like to write in the first person but from somebody else's point of view," she explains. "How would it feel to be doing what they're doing, or feeling what they're feeling? The best way to do that is to figure out how you are alike. Maybe you take a person who you think isn't like you and it's not your story, and you start telling their story and discover the part of it that is your story."
songwriting  japan  music  livemusic  attention  writing  creativity  story  celebrity  psychology  relationships 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Meet Das Racist, the Smartest Stupid Guys in the Room -- New York Magazine
“We could have written a structured treatise attacking corporate proliferation. Or we could just say ‘Pizza Hut Taco Bell’ over and over. That shit’s way funnier.”
music  humor  comedy  songwriting  newyork  business  corporations  attention 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
U2 manager: 'Ultimately free is the enemy of good' | Digital Media - CNET News
One of the reasons we have a worldwide audience is that we were able, we usually have, the biggest touring attraction, but that's not true for everyone. It's important to remember that the traditional worldwide star-making functions of the big record companies. There's nothing on the horizon to replace that.

That was what I was always interested in personally as a businessman and manager. We as a band, U2, were excited about the idea of being big all over the world. We freely admit that. I don't know how people will do that in the future. I think the universality of pop music that we've become used to in the last few decades that's in danger. There is, of course, local repertoires, music in every part of the world. I'm not a mad imperialist.

I'm not trying to get everyone to listen to the same kind of music, but the Beatles caught the imagination of nearly everyone in the world. So did Elvis. There have been a few other examples, like U2. I'd hate to see that stop happening.
music  business  copyright  u2  corporations  rock  songwriting  attention 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge

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