allaboutgeorge + acting   16

The Gentlewoman – Sandra Oh
“It’s actually a gift that there is a timeline, that there is an actual physical timeline,” she says. “Because your body is going to change, you have to deal with reality. And to deal with the reality, you have to know what you want and who you are. We come to it faster, women. Society has taught us this is negative. But it’s like, that is such bullshit!” She laughs. “All I know, all I dream of, is that on the other side of menopause is… Frances McDormand.”
aging  acting  movies  film  television  asian  canada  reputation  presence  women 
16 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Should Art Be a Battleground for Social Justice? - The New York Times
It was called “The Cosby Show,” but it was never really only his (there are lots of unpaid actors and crew members who can attest to that). Those 6,000 or so hours belong as much to the culture and country as they ever did to him. He canceled himself. He was never the show’s legacy. That was always going to be us.
television  reputation  comedy  fiction  acting  social  art  justice  culture  music 
18 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Stefan Kanfer's Tough Without a Gun: What made Humphrey Bogart so great? - By Tom Shone - Slate Magazine
What lends singularity to Bogart's films is the sense of irreversible actions, with moral consequences, being borne by a man standing as if waist-high in a river, braced by events. The action held him in place. Once things happened to him, they didn't un-happen. He didn't get a do-over. When he got slugged, he rubbed his jaw like a kid coming away from the dentist. "When he sweated you could have wrung his shirt," said François Truffaut, doubtless thinking of the first scene The Big Sleep, in which Marlowe comes across Major Sternwood in his hothouse, living off heat like a newborn spider, surrounded by orchids whose flesh so reminds him of the rotten sweetness of corruption.

"Why did you have to go on?" Lauren Bacall asks him.
"Too many people told me to stop," he replies.
hollywood  identity  acting  movies  film  cinema  books  fiction 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How Did Humphrey Bogart Become Immortal? - Alyssa Rosenberg - Culture - The Atlantic
In a world where we have more options in entertainment in general and the movies in particular, why do we continue to need Humphrey Bogart? Rick never figured out why Ilsa ended up in his bar in Casablanca. But why isn't really the important part: All that matters is that she's there.
movies  identity  men  acting  cinema  film  hollywood 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
David O. Russell on His New Film, ‘The Fighter’ - NYTimes.com
That’s the most beautiful thing that I like about boxing: you can take a punch. The biggest thing about taking a punch is your ego reacts and there’s no better spiritual lesson than trying to not pay attention to your ego’s reaction. That’s what takes people out of the fight half the time. They get hit and half the reaction is your ego is saying, I cannot believe that person just lit me up, how humiliating. And what a fighter has to do and what Micky does and what these guys do, whether it’s a prison thing or a crime or a drug episode, is they kind of just go. [He mimes ducking and getting up.]
acting  art  psychology  movies  sports  boxing 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
David Cross Pleads Mercy for Insulting Your Best Friend Jesus | Little Gold Men | Vanity Fair
I don’t like the complete and irreparable erosion of the line between audience and performer. It’s gotten to the point—and I guess it’s always been there if you look at Shakespeare’s days and people throwing tomatoes at performers—where there’s a sense of entitlement that an audience has as a group. If they don’t like you and they don’t agree with you, they feel like they’re entitled to disrupt you. There’s a reason why somebody came up with the heckle comeback, “I don’t come down to where you work and slap the dick out of your mouth.” It happened because somebody was telling a joke and a coward sitting in a darkened theater thought to yell back at him and basically say, “Look at me! I’m funnier than he is!” There’s this crazy sense of entitlement that the audience has that you just don’t find anywhere else.
comedy  acting  playwriting  humor  public  psychology 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Pitchfork: Carrie Brownstein Talks Sleater-Kinney, Acting, Writing, and More
CB: No. I mean, I'm always trying to encourage people not to limit themselves in the same way that many of our parents stayed with one job forever. I've realized that I have a lot of different loves, and I want to pursue writing, but I can never divorce myself from music. When I talked to you, I probably was at that point in playing music where I was likely taking it for granted. That tends to happen after you've been doing it for so long. But once you're away from music, I realize that's as intrinsic to who I am as anything else. That's the part that takes me out of my brain. As you probably know as a writer, anything that can do that for you is kind of a huge relief. So, I mean, it does feel great to be writing, but the process is sometimes excruciating. And nothing is as nice as plugging in your guitar and turning up the volume really loud, just seeing what kind of beautiful noise you can make with it.
pitchfork  interviews  music  creativity  work  guitar  attention  acting 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Hello, Sweet Prince - Jude Law Brings His Hamlet to Broadway - NYTimes.com
“When you’re faced with ‘To be or not to be,’ in the first rehearsal,” Mr. Law said, “there’s a sense of ‘Oh, God, I’m stepping into the world’s greatest cliché.’ But without sounding like a naff old actor, I’m Hamlet, and what a great way to question life and death.” He added: “The reason they’re so famous is because they’re beautifully written and incredibly powerful pieces of dialogue. Never underestimate the power of these lines. Our language is littered with words and phrases from this play, and we use them because we have not, in 400 years, found a better way of putting things.”
acting  shakespeare  denmark  speech  writing  creativity  language  broadway 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Taking Multicultural Stages to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival - NYTimes.com
“I agree that there probably wouldn’t have been a black librarian in Iowa in 1912, but I think we’ve gotten beyond that in watching plays these days."
playwriting  oregon  theater  diversity  creativity  acting  library  shakespeare 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Jon Hamm | TV | A.V. Club
[F]or Don, specifically… he’s not a murderer, but he is an opportunist, and a lot of people can see that as being admirable in some ways. He knows the rules of the game, and he plays it very well.

He’s also often very upfront with what he wants and needs in a certain situation. It goes back to the pilot, when he tells Pete that if he keeps behaving the way he is, he may succeed briefly, but he’ll never truly succeed, because no one will like him, and in this industry, being liked is more important than being effective, in many ways. And that comes back, of course, to bite Pete. He doesn’t learn that lesson, or he learns it too late, when he tries to blackmail Don. So it’s an interesting thing. I don’t necessarily play it any differently. I don’t try to be any more likeable even as I’m doing these reprehensible things. You just hope that the audience has been given enough material and backstory to understand or at least rationalize the character’s behavior, and to see what drives it.
television  story  writing  acting  cable  interviews  fiction  ethics  business 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The Incidental Pleasures of
"[T]he best rejoinder to Public Enemies is Michael Jackson’s Smooth Criminal video, which I watched again after the singer-dancer’s inevitable, untimely death. It’s a tommy-gun gangster fantasia with a touch of Guys and Dolls, and it’s everything Public Enemies isn’t: madly inventive, genre-bending, a passionate tribute to the artist as outlaw/loner. The video reminds you why the gangster has become an existential hero in pop culture: It’s how he seizes the space. On some level Michael Mann knows that, but he’s paralyzed by his pretentions and specious morality. And he can’t dance."
video  pop  movies  cinema  film  acting  aesthetics  identity  dance  beauty 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Motherhood Again - Phylicia Rashad Plays the Matriarch in ‘August - Osage County’ - NYTimes.com
“Every role affords me something different in the way of understanding, and that’s really why you take these roles,” Ms. Rashad said, “not to show that thing that people talk about of showing what you can do, that has nothing to do with anything.”
acting  theater  drama  writing  parenting  nytimes  playwriting 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Movie review: 'Observe and Report'
After all, truth in comedy is why we laugh - we're startled by it, and laughter is the response. Yet truth itself, in the sense of the public's perception of reality, is always evolving and shifting, and comedy always has to keep pace.
comedy  humor  film  cinema  acting  story 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
In an early essay, Harold Pinter describes what drove his work | Culture | The Guardian
In Dusseldorf about two years ago I took, as is the continental custom, a bow with a German cast of The Caretaker at the end of the play on the first night. I was at once booed violently by what must have been the finest collection of booers in the world. I thought they were using megaphones, but it was pure mouth. The cast was as dogged as the audience, however, and we took 34 curtain calls, all to boos. By the 34th there were only two people left in the house, still booing. I was strangely warmed by all this, and now, whenever I sense a tremor of the old apprehension or expectation, I remember Dusseldorf, and am cured.
playwriting  creativity  theater  art  writing  acting  germany  uk  essay 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
The Existential Clown - The Atlantic (December 2008)
To quote Martin Buber: “The world is not comprehensible, but it is embraceable."
movies  film  cinema  identity  humor  criticism  comedy  philosophy  celebrity  acting 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Paris Match: Style: vanityfair.com
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy: "Modeling has a reputation for emptiness, but it’s not. It is certainly not German philosophy, but it was very instructive, because it was made up of real life. You travel, you are always alone, and you better be well grounded, because it’s easy to lose yourself."
beauty  women  acting  aesthetics  identity  philosophy  travel 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: