allaboutgeorge + 1970s   25

After 30 Years, I Finally Went To A Barry Manilow Concert : The Record : NPR
I liked pop and didn't know to call it that. Liked pop and didn't know that me liking it is what in fact made it popular. I didn't know to articulate anything about pop phrasings, straightforward melodies and the crisp, bold enunciations that with some luck and a promo budget meant millions would request a song at radio, meant millions would purchase singles and albums and T-shirts and lunchboxes, would contribute to the radio/sales/tour/merchandise quadruped that, until the internet and "views" and "free," meant a song could gallop to the top, and be, in ways that are more elusive now, a really big show. An artist could reach the kind of places that are, as Jay-Z says, "higher than weather." I didn't know that Barry Manilow made himself as much as he was made. I didn't know he was raised by a single mother in (Williamsburg) Brooklyn. I didn't know what Brooklyn was.
music  1970s  hiphop  celebrity  memory 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Clarence Clemons, Much More Than Springsteen’s Sideman - NYTimes.com
Of course Mr. Clemons was the band’s abiding African-American musician, who kept the E Street Band multiracial after the early departure of a keyboardist, David Sancious, also African-American. Along with the sound his saxophone brought to the songs — of soul and R&B, of urban sophistication and wildness — Mr. Clemons’s imposing figure declared that the E Street Band was sharing rock ’n’ roll’s black heritage, not plundering it. In America’s long, vexed cultural history of race, his bond with Mr. Springsteen made Mr. Clemons a symbol of unity and reconciliation.
rock  music  race  1970s  obituaries  newjersey  r&b 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Clarence Clemons, E Street Band Saxophonist, Dies at 69 - NYTimes.com
He was older than Mr. Springsteen and most of his future band mates, and he often commented on the oddity — even the liability — of being a racially integrated group in those days.

“You had your black bands and you had your white bands,” he wrote in his memoir, “and if you mixed the two you found less places to play.”
race  music  rock  1970s  obituaries 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Boss, the Big Man, and the Best Rock Song of the '70s < PopMatters
From the languid, strings and piano introduction to the gradual build-up (“As secret debts are paid / Contacts made, they vanish unseen), to the guitar solo (3.00 - 3.27), the tension, at once joyous and foreboding, builds and then, instead of crashing, it crests. Enter Clemons at 3.54: the solo. It is extended, totally in charge and almost indescribably affecting. He wails, establishes a groove and then (right around the 5.43 mark) goes to that other place. Finally, just as the strings and piano take over, that last gasp, like a light going out or a life being saved. It is his moment, and in addition to being the best thing he ever did, it ranks as one of the best things anyone has done in a rock song.
music  songwriting  rock  1970s  beauty 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Life in '70s Hunters Point captured in photo book
"[T]here is definitely black pride there. Oh, Lord, I could write a lecture for each of those images."
1970s  from twitter
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Tanya Hamilton's 'Night Catches Us' captures a point in time - Los Angeles Times
I've always been interested in politics, poverty and the working class," says the director. "And the price you pay for dedication to a political movement."

Hamilton sets the tone in the opening credits, turning a series of classic Black Power posters into a potent visual statement but "it was important to me to show the variations of class in black life," she says.

As much as anything, Hamilton says she is drawn to the ordinary within black life, rather than the extremes. "There's a distinct lack of content specific to what it is to be a black American, the variations in that experience, what life is like for people who are ordinary. Those are the stories I want to tell."
film  cinema  black  race  1970s  philadelphia  writing  activism  class  african  politics  poverty  art 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Listening to Van Morrison by Greil Marcus | Books | The Guardian
"How," he said, "can you write about Morrison's music without taking into account what a completely unpleasant person he is?"

I never know how to answer that kind of question, because it represents a whole way of being in the world that's foreign to me. I don't believe that a person's life necessarily has anything to do with what he or she creates, whether the person in question is a musician, a painter, an accountant, an engineer, a designer or a cleaner. A person's work is not reducible to his or her neuroses, and a person's neuroses are not the determinant of a person's work. In the act, the work can take over; it can produce its own momentum, its own imperatives, its own yarragh. It can create its own necessity, its own insistence that, in the act, the world conform to the demands the work is making on it. "I don't know that Van Morrison is a completely unpleasant person," I said. "But I don't really care. I don't see what one thing has to do with the other."
music  psychology  uk  rock  books  criticism  1960s  1970s  beauty  art 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Music - James Taylor and Carole King’s ‘Troubadour Reunion’ Tour - NYTimes.com
As reunions go, this one is less dramatic than some others from the period. While Ms. King and Mr. Taylor performed and recorded together quite a bit in the early 1970s, they were never formally a duo. They never fell out and never broke up. Most significantly — and highly uncharacteristically for those freewheeling times — they were never lovers, so there was no complicated personal history to resolve. If the tour can be said to have a message, it’s that not everything has to end — or end badly.

“It’s nice to see a man and a woman who have continually respected what they meant to each other professionally,” said Sheila Weller, the author of “Girls Like Us,” a book about Ms. King, Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon. “It’s like the people in ‘The Big Chill’: ‘I will never let you down. No matter where you are, call me and I’ll come.’ ”
friendship  music  livemusic  songwriting  1960s  1970s  women  men 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Bruce Handy on Mad Men | vanityfair.com
“I’m not avoiding answering the question, but I’m doing something that I do a lot, which is avoiding saying, ‘I don’t know.’ And that’s from my family—it’s really bad to get caught not knowing something. I hope I’ll know when I get there. When I started the show, when I had the inkling of the idea, I thought, What was it like for people to go through this [historical period]? It wasn’t a loss of innocence, but things really did change. There was some shit falling apart, as much as there was in the 1930s. Hopefully we don’t have to experience that again, but to come out on the other side and, you know, What does Don look like when Kent State happens? I would kind of like to know that.”
television  culture  magazines  1960s  aesthetics  1970s  writing  cable 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Tapes Reveal Nixon’s View of Abortion - NYTimes.com
“There are times when an abortion is necessary. I know that. When you have a black and a white,” he told an aide, before adding: “Or a rape.”
abortion  nixon  president  power  politics  republicans  1970s  history 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Doing It: Books: The New Yorker
If “The Joy of Sex” was like “Joy of Cooking”—though in some ways it was closer to Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking,” what with its strong authorial voice and affection for elaborate undertakings, to which Comfort assigned French names like pattes d’araignée, cuissade, and feuille de rose—“Our Bodies, Ourselves” was like the “Moosewood Cookbook.” Everything in it was healthful, enlightened, nourishing.
books  sex  writing  1970s  newyorker 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Movie Review - 'Milk' - Freedom Fighter in Life Becomes Potent Symbol in Death - NYTimes.com
[...] “My name is Harvey Milk, and I want to recruit you.” That was an opening line that the real Milk often used in his speeches to break the tension with straight audiences, but the film shows him deploying it with mostly gay crowds as well, with a slightly different inflection. He wants to recruit them into the politics of democracy, to persuade them that the stigma and discrimination they are used to enduring quietly and even guiltily can be addressed by voting, by demonstrating, by claiming the share of power that is every citizen’s birthright and responsibility. [...]
gay  politics  sanfrancisco  1970s  bayarea  reviews  film  cinema  movies  government  voting  power  speech  identity 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
The new Joy of Sex: why you still need help in bed - Times Online
“I think what a lot of the other material out there misses is how powerful sex is; people die for it, literally. One of the ways we've gone wrong in the past is that we haven't recognised this emotional power. Sex isn't a game - it's not pink and black and fluffy. So I think there still is a need for a book that takes sex seriously.”
sex  books  aesthetics  biology  science  reading  1970s  uk  gender  men  women  health 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
James Brown - Funky President « Funky16Corners
"Not like anyone gives a crap, but I figured it couldn’t hurt to put the idea out there again, to paraphrase the great George Carlin, I’m putting on my beret and going down to the rally."
obama  elections  campaigns  democrats  2008  politics  music  1970s  president 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Kris Kristofferson talks booze, hellraising and landing a chopper on Johnny Cash's lawn | Pop | guardian.co.uk Music
"I've come to appreciate how special a song is compared to other art forms, because you can carry it around in your head and your heart and it remains part of you. It just comes as natural as a bird to me, always did."
songwriting  music  rock  1960s  1970s  country  creativity 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
The best Joni Mitchell song ever. - By Ron Rosenbaum - Slate Magazine
"It occurs to me that in some way that's what 'Amelia's' enigma or paradox is about: True love is far more alarming than a false alarm. [... I]t may be better to have loved and lost than to have loved and won, which can be truly terrifying."
music  criticism  rock  1970s  aesthetics  travel  songwriting  love 
december 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Okay, He Wore Polyester. But He Still Speaks to Us. - washingtonpost.com
"'The ethnic American feels unappreciated for the contribution he makes to society. In many ways he is treated like the machine he operates or the pencil he pushes.'"
ethnicity  dance  1970s  music  race  nyc 
december 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Houston Press: The Raw Power of Really Smooth Music
"I've always felt fortunate, back as far as the Doobies, that we've always been embraced by black radio. In fact, as a solo artist, had it not been for black radio, you would never have heard of me. [...]"
1970s  music  songwriting  pop  rock 
september 2007 by allaboutgeorge
The Benign Comedy: Good evening Santa Barbara! Are you ready to self-medicate??!
"Each minute on 'Minute By Minute,' even the song by other members McDonald lets 'em do, is so smooth and slick that your brain cannot withstand its intervention. You do not listen to 'Minute By Minute'; you just lie back and let the music do its thing"
songwriting  music  1970s  pop  criticism 
september 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Old interviews redefine "Star Wars" mythology | Entertainment | Entertainment News | Reuters.com
"Remember, science-fiction films do really great the first week, then they drop off to nothing. It's a good sign, but it doesn't mean anything. Let's wait a couple of weeks. [...] I don't want to count my chickens before they hatch."
sciencefiction  cinema  interview  interviews  1970s 
april 2007 by allaboutgeorge
A Gumshoe Adrift, Lost in the ’70s - New York Times
"This private eye is so private that he seems always to be talking to himself, mumbling a running commentary on the action in an attempt to convince himself, against the evidence of the world’s near-total indifference to everything he says or does [...]
cinema  1970s  aesthetics  identity  noir  fiction  creativity 
april 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Disco Delivery: BBC Radio 2 - The Record Producers: Nile Rodgers
"Correct me if I'm wrong, but this is probably the first time I've heard Chic's sound taken apart, analyzed and put back together in this way."
songwriting  music  dance  1970s  1980s  creativity 
march 2007 by allaboutgeorge
NYT: Same Stooges. Different World. Finer Wine.
"[T]he real subject [...] was 'a fairly loosely aggregated industry-slash-palace guard that has coalesced around the corpus of something called rock, and that something has grown to have something to do with units of digital information [...]"
rock  music  marketing  1970s  punk  corporations 
february 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Yacht-Pop
complementary to fans of Channel 101's "Yacht Rock" -- stay smooth!
music  songwriting  1970s  1980s  oceans 
december 2005 by allaboutgeorge

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