Chemistry: Challenges and Solutions - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
02/06/2014
A video-based instructional series in chemistry with accompanying web site for high school and college classes. 13 half-hour programs, online text, course guide, interactive lessons, historical timeline and periodic table.

Chemistry: Challenges and Solutions teaches concepts of general chemistry by presenting real challenges in energy production, materials development, biochemistry, and environmental protection. The course zeroes in on core topics taught in introductory chemistry, providing a strong foundation for learners to pursue further study in science, med-tech fields, or a liberal education. Videos include lab demonstrations of key laws and processes, interviews with research scientists and industrial chemists, and explanatory animations. An online text covers science history and major discoveries with clear explanations and graphics. Interactive labs provide hands-on simulations of chemical processes.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Chemistry  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop  Curriculum  Periodic-Tables-of-Elements  Energy  Biochemistry  Environment  Harvard  Smithsonian-Education 
9 weeks ago
Drug Addiction - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/23/2014
Many people do not understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. It is often mistakenly assumed that drug abusers lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop using drugs simply by choosing to change their behavior. In reality, drug addiction is a complex disease, and quitting takes more than good intentions or a strong will. In fact, because drugs change the brain in ways that foster compulsive drug abuse, quitting is difficult, even for those who are ready to do so. Through scientific advances, we know more about how drugs work in the brain than ever, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and lead productive lives.
Library-of-Resources  National-Institutes-of-Health  National-Institute-on-Drug-Abuse  Addiction  Brain  Drugs  Public-Health  Disease 
11 weeks ago
Cost of Discipleship: Dietrich Bonhoeffer - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/12/2014
The Cost of Discipleship is a book by the German Theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer, considered a classic of Christian thought. The original German title is simply Nachfolge (Discipleship). It is centered around an exposition of the Sermon on the Mount, in which Bonhoeffer spells out what he believes it means to follow Christ. It was first published in 1937, when the rise of the Nazi regime was underway in Germany and against this background that Bonhoeffer's theology of costly discipleship developed, which ultimately led to his death.
Library-of-Resources  Masterpieces  Religion  Christian-Heritage  Jewish-Heritage  Holocaust  Bonhoeffer  Nazis  Bible  German-Heritage 
january 2014
Our World - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/03/2014
Elementary students (grades K-5) learn more about Our World through the power of video segments. Through NASAs lens, the segments compare the natural world with the designed world, illustrating the ways to make the most of this world while propelling us into new worlds. This program is designed to supplement existing elementary learning objectives not only in STEM, but also in reading, writing, and visual and performing arts.
Library-of-Resources  NASA  Science-Education  Space-Science  Curriculum 
january 2014
From Jesus to Christ - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/22/2013
"From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians" tells the epic story of the rise of Christianity. The four hours explore the life and death of Jesus, and the men and women whose belief, conviction, and martyrdom created the religion we now know as Christianity.

Drawing upon historical evidence, the series challenges familiar assumptions and conventional notions about Christian origins. Archaeological finds have yielded new understandings of Jesus' class and social status; fresh interpretations have transformed earlier ideas about the identity of the early Christians and their communities.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  Frontline  Religion  Christian-Heritage  Jewish-Heritage  Hellenic-Culture  Archaeology  Bible 
december 2013
Christmas Library - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/15/2013
Christmas (Old English: Crīstesmæsse, meaning "Christ's Mass") is an annual commemoration of the birth of Jesus Christ and a widely observed holiday, celebrated generally on December 25 by billions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it closes the Advent season and initiates the twelve days of Christmastide, which ends after the twelfth night. Christmas is a civil holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated by an increasing number of non-Christians, and is an integral part of the Christmas and holiday season.
Library-of-Resources  Christmas  Holidays  Christian-Heritage  Religion  Children's-Literature  Children's-Songs  December 
december 2013
When Worlds Collide - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/08/2013
Dan Mc Dowell, an AP World History teacher, writes about his work on the NEH supported PBS program When Worlds Collide and its website. The focus of the program is the first hundred years after Columbus in both in Old and the New World. He discusses how history and social studies teachers can make the most of the website's mulitmedia rich resources.
PBS  National-Endowment-of-the-Humanities  Columbus  Inca-Empire  Explorations  Native-American-Heritage  Jewish-Heritage  Food  Religion  Mayan-Civilization  World-History  Hispanic-Heritage  Annenberg  Library-of-Resources  Mexico 
december 2013
Against All Odds: Inside Statistics - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/04/2013
Picking up where the original Against All Odds left off, the new series maintains the same emphasis on "doing" statistics. Each unit is based on a video module that introduces a statistical topic in real-world context and takes you on location to where people from all walks of life are using statistics in their work. Starting with descriptive statistics, the course continues through probability and inference. Examples range from finding patterns in lightning strikes, to examining possible generic resistance to deadly Lassa fever in West Africa, to linking DDT to the decline of peregrine falcons. Online interactive tools allow students to practice and use whey they've learned.
Annenberg  Library-of-Resources  Mathematics  Science-Education  Statistics  Math-Inservice  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop 
december 2013
What Works Clearinghouse - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
11/29/2013
We review the research on the different programs, products, practices, and policies in education.

Then, by focusing on the results from high-quality research, we try to answer the question “What works in education?”

Our goal is to provide educators with the information they need to make evidence-based decisions.
Library-of-Resources  Education  Mathematics  Science-Education  Literacy-and-Reading  US-Department-of-Education  Elementary-School-Workshop  Middle-School-Workshop  High-School-Workshop 
november 2013
E-Book Library - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/09/2013
An electronic book (variously: e-book, eBook, e-Book, ebook, digital book, or even e-edition) is a book-length publication in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, readable on computers or other electronic devices. Although sometimes defined as "an electronic version of a printed book", many e-books exist without any printed equivalent. Commercially produced and sold e-books are usually intended to be read on dedicated e-book readers, however, almost any sophisticated electronic device that features a controllable viewing screen, including computers, many mobile phones, and all smartphones can also be used to read e-books.
Library-of-Resources  Literacy-and-Reading  Poetry  Children's-Literature 
october 2013
Afghanistan Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/08/2013
Afghanistan, officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked sovereign state forming part of South Asia, Central Asia, and to some extent Western Asia. It has a population of around 30 million inhabiting an area of approximately 647,500 km2 (250,001 sq mi), making it the 42nd most populous and 41st largest nation in the world. It is bordered by Pakistan in the south and the east, Iran in the west, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan in the north, and China in the far northeast.

Afghanistan has been an ancient focal point of the Silk Road and human migration. Archaeologists have found evidence of human habitation from as far back as the Middle Paleolithic. Urban civilization may have begun in the area as early as 3,000 to 2,000 BC. Sitting at an important geostrategic location that connects the Middle East culture with Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent,[11] the land has been home to various peoples through the ages and witnessed many military campaigns, notably by Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, and in modern era Western forces. The land also served as a source from which the Greco-Bactrians, Kushans, Hephthalites, Saffarids, Ghaznavids, Ghorids, Mughals, Durranis, and others have risen to form major empires.
Afghanistan  Folksongs  Library-of-Resources  Muslim-Heritage  Smithsonian-Folkways  World-Cultures  World-Language  South-Asia 
october 2013
Earthquakes - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/08/2013
At the Earth's surface, earthquakes manifest themselves by shaking and sometimes displacement of the ground. When the epicenter of a large earthquake is located offshore, the seabed may be displaced sufficiently to cause a tsunami. Earthquakes can also trigger landslides, and occasionally volcanic activity.

In its most general sense, the word earthquake is used to describe any seismic event — whether natural or caused by humans — that generates seismic waves. Earthquakes are caused mostly by rupture of geological faults, but also by other events such as volcanic activity, landslides, mine blasts, and nuclear tests. An earthquake's point of initial rupture is called its focus or hypocenter. The epicenter is the point at ground level directly above the hypocenter.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  NOVA  Earth-Science  Disasters  Weather  Japan  East-and-Southeast-Asia  Earthquakes  Current-Events  Science-Education 
october 2013
Ghosts of Machu Picchu - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/08/2013
Perched atop a mountain crest, mysteriously abandoned more than four centuries ago, Machu Picchu is the most famous archeological ruin in the Western Hemisphere and an iconic symbol of the power and engineering prowess of the Inca. In the years since Machu Picchu was discovered by Hiram Bingham in 1911, there have been countless theories about this "Lost City of the Incas," yet it remains an enigma. Why did the Incas build it on such an inaccessible site? Who lived among its stone buildings, farmed its emerald green terraces, and drank from its sophisticated aqueduct system?
Library-of-Resources  PBS  NOVA  Inca-Empire  Technology-and-Engineering  Hispanic-Heritage  Peru  Archaeology 
october 2013
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein: Charles T. Barton - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/07/2013
Bud Abbott and Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein - the film's poster title - or Bud Abbott Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein - the onscreen title - (although the film is often referred to as simply Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein) is a 1948 American horror comedy film directed by Charles Barton and starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. It is the first of several films where the comedy duo meets classic characters from Universal's horror film stable. In this film, they encounter Count Dracula, Frankenstein's monster and the Wolf Man, while subsequent films pair the duo with the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and the Invisible Man. On a TV special in the early 1950s, the two did a sketch where they interacted with the latest original Universal Studios monster being promoted at the time, the Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). The film is considered the swan song for the "Big Three" Universal horror monsters – Count Dracula, the Wolf Man and Frankenstein's monster – although it does not appear to fit within the loose continuity of the earlier films.
Film  National-Film-Registry  Halloween  Masterpieces  Abbott-and-Costello  Frankenstein  Barton  Library-of-Resources 
october 2013
Hurricanes and Tsunamis - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
10/02/2013
A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone or severe tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. A typical cyclone is accompanied by thunderstorms, and in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near the earth’s surface.

All Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastal areas are subject to hurricanes. Parts of the Southwest United States and the Pacific Coast also experience heavy rains and floods each year from hurricanes spawned off Mexico. The Atlantic hurricane season lasts from June to November, with the peak season from mid-August to late October. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season begins May 15 and ends November 30.
Library-of-Resources  NOVA  PBS  Science-Education  Weather  Disasters  Hurricanes  Tsunami  Japan  Louisiana  Current-Events  Earth-Science  East-and-Southeast-Asia 
october 2013
Big Read - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
09/17/2013
The Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts, designed to revitalize the role of literature in American culture and to encourage citizens to read for pleasure and enlightenment. The NEA presents The Big Read in partnership with Arts Midwest.

The Big Read answers a big need. Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America, a 2004 report by the National Endowment for the Arts, found that not only is literary reading in America declining rapidly among all groups, but that the rate of decline has accelerated, especially among the young. The concerned citizen in search of good news about American literary culture would study the pages of this report in vain.

The Big Read aims to address this crisis squarely and effectively. It provides citizens with the opportunity to read and discuss a single book within their communities. The Big Read supports organizations across the country in developing community-wide reading programs which encourage reading and participation by diverse audiences. Organizations selected to participate in The Big Read receive a grant, access to online training resources and opportunities, and educational and promotional materials designed to support widespread community involvement.
Library-of-Resources  National-Endowment-for-the-Arts  Literacy-and-Reading  Curriculum  Poetry  English-Literature  American-History  American-Life 
september 2013
Books That Shaped America - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
09/15/2013
Summer often includes vacation with lots of time to catch up on popular novels and biographies and old favorites. On June 25, the Library of Congress launched a new exhibition, "Books That Shaped America," featuring 88 books by American authors. Which books have shaped you or your students?
Library-of-Congress  Library-of-Resources  English-Literature  American-History  American-Life  Literacy-and-Reading  Poetry 
september 2013
Peace Corps: PDF Files - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
08/16/2013
The Peace Corps traces its roots and mission to 1960, when then Senator John F. Kennedy challenged students at the University of Michigan to serve their country in the cause of peace by living and working in developing countries. From that inspiration grew an agency of the federal government devoted to world peace and friendship.

Since that time, 210,000+ Peace Corps Volunteers have served in 139 host countries to work on issues ranging from AIDS education to information technology and environmental preservation.

Today's Peace Corps is more vital than ever, working in emerging and essential areas such as information technology and business development, and contributing to the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. Peace Corps Volunteers continue to help countless individuals who want to build a better life for themselves, their children, and their communities.
Library-of-Resources  Peace-Corps  Disease  Technology-and-Engineering  Environment  HIV/AIDS  World-Cultures  World-Problems  Curriculum  Education  Literacy-and-Reading  Public-Health 
august 2013
Banjo Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/31/2013
The banjo is a four-, five- or (occasionally) six-stringed instrument with a thin membrane stretched over a frame or cavity as a resonator. The membrane is typically a piece of animal skin or plastic, and the frame is typically circular. Simpler forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in Colonial America, adapted from several African instruments of similar design.

The banjo is frequently associated with country, folk, Irish traditional and bluegrass music. Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in African American traditional music, before becoming popular in the minstrel shows of the 19th century. In fact, slaves were both influenced by and influenced the early development of the music, which became country and bluegrass, particularly in regards to the innovation of musical techniques for both the banjo and fiddle. The banjo, with the fiddle, is a mainstay of American old-time music.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Banjo  Black-Heritage  Folksongs  Bluegrass 
august 2013
Russia Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/26/2013
Russia is a country in northern Eurasia. It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects. From northwest to southeast, Russia shares land borders with Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Poland (both with Kaliningrad Oblast), Belarus, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, China, Mongolia, and North Korea. It shares maritime borders with Japan by the Sea of Okhotsk, and the US state of Alaska across the Bering Strait. At 17,075,400 square kilometres (6,592,800 sq mi), Russia is the largest country in the world, covering more than one-eighth of the Earth's inhabited land area. Russia is also the world's ninth most populous nation with 143 million people as of 2012. Extending across the whole of northern Asia and much of Europe, Russia spans nine time zones and incorporates a wide range of environments and landforms.

The nation's history began with that of the East Slavs, who emerged as a recognizable group in Europe between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Founded and ruled by a Varangian warrior elite and their descendants, the medieval state of Rus arose in the 9th century. In 988 it adopted Orthodox Christianity from the Byzantine Empire, beginning the synthesis of Byzantine and Slavic cultures that defined Russian culture for the next millennium. Rus' ultimately disintegrated into a number of smaller states; most of the Rus' lands were overrun by the Mongol invasion and became tributaries of the nomadic Golden Horde. The Grand Duchy of Moscow gradually reunified the surrounding Russian principalities, achieved independence from the Golden Horde, and came to dominate the cultural and political legacy of Kievan Rus'. By the 18th century, the nation had greatly expanded through conquest, annexation, and exploration to become the Russian Empire, which was the third largest empire in history, stretching from Poland in Europe to Alaska in North America.

Following the Russian Revolution, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic became the largest and leading constituent of the Soviet Union, the world's first constitutionally socialist state and a recognized superpower, which played a decisive role in the Allied victory in World War II. The Soviet era saw some of the most significant technological achievements of the 20th century, including the world's first human spaceflight. The Russian Federation became the successor state of the Russian SFSR following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, and is recognized as the continuing legal personality of the All-Union state.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Russia  Russian  World-Language  World-Cultures  Folksongs 
july 2013
Wales Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/25/2013
Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain, bordered by England to its east and the Atlantic Ocean and Irish Sea to its west. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456, and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,200 km (750 mi) of coastline, and is largely mountainous, with its highest peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone, and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Welsh national identity emerged among the Celtic Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. Llywelyn ap Gruffydd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to what was to become modern Wales, in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales was annexed by England, and incorporated within the English legal system, under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542. Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century. Welsh Liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party. Welsh national feeling grew over the century; Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925 and the Welsh Language Society in 1962. Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters.

Although Wales shares a close political and social history with the rest of Great Britain, and almost everyone speaks English, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity and is officially bilingual. Over 560,000 Welsh language speakers live in Wales, where it is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and west. From the late 19th century onwards, Wales acquired its popular image as the "land of song", attributable in part to the eisteddfod tradition.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Europe  United-Kingdom  Wales  World-Cultures  World-Language  Welsh  Folksongs 
july 2013
Hungary Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/24/2013
Hungary is a landlocked country in Central Europe. It is situated in the Carpathian Basin and is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine and Romania to the east, Serbia and Croatia to the south, Slovenia to the southwest and Austria to the west. The country's capital and largest city is Budapest. Hungary is a member of the European Union, NATO, the OECD, the Visegrád Group, and the Schengen Agreement. The official language is Hungarian, also known as Magyar, which is part of the Finno-Ugric group and is the most widely spoken non-Indo-European language in Europe.

Following periods of successive habitation by Celts, Romans, Huns, Slavs, Gepids, and Avars, the foundation of Hungary was laid in the late 9th century by the Hungarian grand prince Árpád. His great-grandson Saint Stephen I converted the country to a Christian kingdom in the early 11th century. The Kingdom of Hungary existed for 946 years (with interruptions) and at various times it was a major political power in Europe and one of the cultural centers of the Western world. After about 150 years of partial Ottoman occupation (1541–1699), Hungary was integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy, and later formed part of the Austro–Hungarian Empire (1867–1918).

A great power until the end of World War I; the Kingdom of Hungary subsequently lost approximately 72 percent of its territory, 64 percent of its total population, one third of its ethnic Hungarian population, five of its ten largest cities and all its sea ports under the Treaty of Trianon. The kingdom was succeeded by an authoritarian regime, and then a communist one (1947–1989). Hungary gained widespread international attention during the Revolution of 1956 and the seminal opening of its border with Austria in 1989, which accelerated the collapse of the Eastern Bloc.

Since 1989, Hungary has been a democratic parliamentary republic, and today it is considered a developed country with a high-income economy.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Hungarian  Hungary  World-Language  World-Cultures  Europe  Violin  Folksongs 
july 2013
Will to Adorn - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/24/2013
African American traditions of dress and body adornment are creative expressions grounded in the history of African-descended populations in the United States. They have been shaped by the identities born of African heritage and continuities; legacies of slavery and resistance; encounters and alliances between the Africans, indigenous Americans, Europeans, and more recent African and Caribbean diasporas; the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements; group commitments to faith; and the politics of gender. They reveal continuities of ideas, values, skills, and knowledge rooted on the African continent and in the American experience.

Communities of African descendants in the United States are diverse. There is no one way to be “authentically” African American. African Americans “belong” to many communities variously defined by ethnic, class, gender, regional, religious, political, cultural, and other affiliations that exist in complex interrelationship with each other. Accordingly, there is no single African American aesthetic of dress; there are many aesthetics that at times overlap, intertwine, and are juxtaposed in visual dialogues defining difference. Just as the changing demographics of the United States as a nation calls for a broader definition of who is representative of America, the diversity of American African descendants also demands recognition and acknowledgement.
Black-Heritage  Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  World-Cultures  American-Life  Fashion  Identity  Folklife 
july 2013
One World, Many Voices - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/24/2013
Of the more than 7,000 languages spoken in the world today—many of them unrecorded—up to half may disappear in this century. As languages vanish, communities lose a wealth of knowledge about history, culture, the natural environment, and the human mind.

The One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage Festival program highlights language diversity as a vital part of our human heritage. Cultural experts from communities around the world join us to demonstrate how their ancestral tongues embody cultural knowledge, identity, values, technologies, and arts.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  World-Language  World-Cultures  UNESCO  Identity  Folksongs 
july 2013
Coffee - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/23/2013
Coffee is a brewed beverage prepared from the roasted seeds of several species of an evergreen shrub of the genus Coffea. The two most common sources of coffee beans are the highly regarded Coffea arabica, and the "robusta" form of the hardier Coffea canephora. The latter is resistant to the coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix), but has a more bitter taste. Coffee plants are cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in equatorial Latin America, Southeast Asia, Maldives, and Africa. Once ripe, coffee "berries" are picked, processed, and dried to yield the seeds inside. The seeds are then roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor, before being ground and brewed to create coffee.

Coffee is slightly acidic (pH 5.0–5.1) and can have a stimulating effect on humans because of its caffeine content. It is one of the most consumed drinks in the world. It can be prepared and presented in a variety of ways. Many studies have examined the health effects of coffee, and whether the overall effects of coffee consumption are positive or negative has been widely disputed. The majority of recent research suggests that moderate coffee consumption is benign or mildly beneficial in healthy adults. However, coffee can worsen the symptoms of some conditions, such as anxiety, largely due to the caffeine and diterpenes it contains.

Wild coffee's energizing effect was likely first discovered in the northeast region of Ethiopia. Coffee cultivation first took place in southern Arabia; the earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi shrines of Yemen. In East Africa and Yemen, coffee was used in native religious ceremonies that were in competition with the Christian Church. As a result, the Ethiopian Church banned its secular consumption until the reign of Emperor Menelik II of Ethiopia. The beverage was also banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons and was associated with rebellious political activities in Europe.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Uganda  Coffee  Peace  NASA 
july 2013
Broadside - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
07/22/2013
The Best of Broadside, Anthems of the American Underground from the Pages of Broadside Magazine. Eighty-nine songs, including some never commercially released. Compiled and annotated by Jeff Place and Ronald D. Cohen. A five CD boxed set. Broadside was a small underground magazine smuggled out of a New York City housing project in a baby carriage, filled with new songs by artists who were too creative for the folkies and too radical for the establishment. A still-underground Bob Dylan, Janis Ian, Rev. Frederick Douglass Kirkpatrick, Phil Ochs, Malvina Reynolds, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Pete Seeger, and dozens of others first published songs like "Blowin' in the Wind," "Little Boxes," and "Society's Child," in Broadside. The Best of Broadside features 89 songs from the Folkways collection, tapes from the Broadside magazine office, and some tracks released on other labels. The set contains a variety of performers, topics, and musical styles that tell tales spanning the 25 years of the Broadside era (1962-1988), but many of them address contemporary issues as well, since the new millennium has not see the end of warfare, nuclear threat, ethnic conflict, immigrants' suffering, women's unequal rights, ecological devastation, and social injustice. This is the underground music that fueled the innocent-sounding Folk Revival on the one hand and the explosions of angry rock and rap on the other. The Best of Broadside brings an era, its musicians, and its many stories to a new audience. The extensive notes feature the graphics of the original Broadside magazine and provide information on the careers of its many musicians with extensive discographies, the stories behind most of the songs as well as their full texts. They also describe the dramatic history of the magazine itself—a remarkable achievement of dedicated musicians and social activists.
Smithsonian-Folkways  Broadside  Library-of-Resources 
july 2013
India Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/26/2013
India is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south-west, and the Bay of Bengal on the south-east, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west;[d] China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north-east; and Burma and Bangladesh to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives; in addition, India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Home to the ancient Indus Valley Civilisation – one of the world's earliest – and a region of historic trade routes and vast empires, the Indian subcontinent was identified with its commercial and cultural wealth for much of its long history. Four world religions—Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism—originated here, whereas Zoroastrianism, Christianity, and Islam arrived in the 1st millennium CE and also helped shape the region's diverse culture. Gradually annexed by and brought under the administration of the British East India Company from the early 18th century and administered directly by the United Kingdom from the mid-19th century, India became an independent nation in 1947 after a struggle for independence that was marked by non-violent resistance led by Mahatma Gandhi.
Library-of-Resources  India  Smithsonian-Folkways  UNESCO  South-Asia  Asian-Culture  World-Cultures  World-Language  Folksongs 
june 2013
What Makes It Great: Robert Kapilow - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/16/2013
Robert Kapilow (December 22, 1952) is an American composer, conductor, and music commentator. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale University, a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, and a student of Nadia Boulanger. He initially gained recognition for his classical music radio program, What Makes It Great?, which is under the umbrella of National Public Radio's Performance Today. On the program he presents live full-length concert evenings and series throughout North America. Kapilow's program has become a recurring event at New York's Lincoln Center (where Kapilow has the distinction of being the only artist to have his own series), in Boston, Los Angeles and Kansas City among other venues.
NPR  Performance-Today  Kapilow  Masterpieces  Classical-Music 
june 2013
Casey at the Bat: Ernest Thayer - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/15/2013
"Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888" is a baseball poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. First published in The San Francisco Examiner on June 3, 1888, it was later popularized by DeWolf Hopper in many vaudeville performances.
Poetry  Masterpieces  National-Recording-Registry  Sports  Children's-Literature  Baseball  Thayer  American-Life  Library-of-Resources  Hopper  Library-of-Congress  Sparrow-Tree-Square  Reading-Rainbow  Annenberg  Disney 
june 2013
Secrets of the Parthenon - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/12/2013
For 25 centuries the Parthenon has been shot at, set on fire, rocked by earthquakes, looted for its sculptures, almost destroyed by explosion, and disfigured by well-meaning renovations. It has gone from temple, to church, to mosque, to munitions dump. What could be next? How about a scientific search for the secrets of its incomparable beauty and astonishingly rapid construction?
Library-of-Resources  PBS  NOVA  Annenberg  Disney  Mathematics  Science-Education  Technology-and-Engineering  Art-History  Archaeology  Hellenic-Culture  World-History  Parthenon  Architecture 
june 2013
Violin on Video - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/03/2013
The violin is a string instrument, usually with four strings tuned in perfect fifths. It is the smallest, highest-pitched member of the violin family of string instruments, which also includes the viola, cello and doublebass.

The violin is sometimes informally called a fiddle, regardless of the type of music played on it. The word violin comes from the Medieval Latin word vitula, meaning stringed instrument; this word is also believed to be the source of the Germanic "fiddle".

The violin is played by musicians in a wide variety of musical genres, including Baroque music, classical, jazz, folk music, rock and roll, and soft rock. The violin has come to be played in many non-Western music cultures all over the world.
Library-of-Resources  Violin  From-the-Top  PBS  Smithsonian-Folkways  Library-of-Congress  Teachers'-Domain  Kennedy-Center  Performance-Today  American-Public-Media  Folklife  World-Cultures  String-Quartet  NPR  Child-Performers  Metropolitan-Museum-of-Art 
june 2013
Abiyoyo: Pete Seeger - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/02/2013
The Abiyoyo story by Pete Seeger has proved to be a favorite with children in preschool classrooms. Teachers report that “this unit is our all-time favorite” and that "disappear has become a part of the children’s vocabulary.” The story is appropriate for any season; however, it is longer than many stories read to young children and contains some unfamiliar words, such as ostracize and disappear. Even though the story is longer and more complex than many preschool stories, many teachers link it to their Halloween theme. It may be grouped with units based on monster stories, African stories, or families. The themes and concepts on which the daily activities are based are disappear, shadows, faster, and happy.
Library-of-Resources  Reading-Rainbow  Children's-Literature  Children's-Songs  Seeger  Masterpieces  PBS  Folklife  Between-the-Lions  Smithsonian-Folkways  Halloween 
june 2013
Between the Lions - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/02/2013
Between the Lions is a PBS Kids' puppet show designed to promote reading. The show is a co-production between WGBH in Boston and Sirius Thinking, Ltd., in New York City, in association with Mississippi Public Broadcasting, in Mississippi. The show has won seven Daytime Emmy awards between 2001 and 2007. The target audience is children 4 to 7 years old. It has the same puppet style as Sesame Street and several season 2 episodes, notably in Dance in Smarty Pants, had a few characters from Sesame Street guest appearing. Between The Lions started its 10th and final season on September 20, 2010. The Show Ended in November 22 2010 Along with Reading Rainbow.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  Between-the-Lions  Children's-Literature  Literacy-and-Reading  Teachers'-Domain  Games  Curriculum  Poetry 
june 2013
Franklin Roosevelt, President - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
06/01/2013
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, also known by his initials, FDR, was the 32nd President of the United States (1933–1945) and a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic depression and total war. A dominant leader of the Democratic Party and the only American president elected to more than two terms, he built a New Deal Coalition that realigned American politics after 1932, as his domestic policies defined American liberalism for the middle third of the 20th century.

Roosevelt dominated the American political scene not only during the twelve years of his presidency, but also for decades afterward. He orchestrated the realignment of voters that created the Fifth Party System. FDR's New Deal Coalition united labor unions, big city machines, white ethnics, African Americans and rural white Southerners. He also influenced the later creation of the United Nations and Bretton Woods. Roosevelt is consistently rated by scholars as one of the top three U.S. Presidents, along with Abraham Lincoln and George Washington.
Library-of-Resources  Library-of-Congress  Presidents  Roosevelt  World-War-II  PBS  American-Experience  American-History  National-Endowment-of-the-Humanities  EDSITEment  Teachers'-Domain  Depression  New-Deal 
june 2013
Habitable Planet: A Systems Approach to Environmental Science - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/31/2013
The Habitable Planet: A Systems Approach to Environmental Science is a course for high school teachers and undergraduate students in environmental science. The content course will help teachers of biology, chemistry, and Earth science to provide more content in their classes.

This course begins with an overview of the Earth's systems — geophysical, atmospheric, oceanic, and ecosystems — as they exist independently of human influence. Following this introduction, the course explores the effect that human activities have on the different natural systems. Topics include human population growth and resource use, increasing competition for fresh water, and climate change.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Atmosphere  Oceanography  Global-Warming  Ecology  Public-Health  Agriculture  Energy  Earth-Science  Population  Harvard  Smithsonian-Education  Environment  Geography  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop  Earth-Day  Howard-Hughes-Medical-Institute 
may 2013
Faces of America - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/30/2013
What made America? What makes us? These two questions are at the heart of the new PBS series Faces of America with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. The Harvard scholar turns to the latest tools of genealogy and genetics to explore the family histories of 12 renowned Americans — professor and poet Elizabeth Alexander, chef Mario Batali, comedian Stephen Colbert, novelist Louise Erdrich, journalist Malcolm Gladwell, actress Eva Longoria, musician Yo-Yo Ma, director Mike Nichols, Her Majesty Queen Noor, television host/heart surgeon Dr. Mehmet Oz, actress Meryl Streep, and figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  Faces-of-America  Immigration  American-History  American-Life  Gates  Harvard  Genetics  National-Endowment-of-the-Humanities  EDSITEment  DNA  Genealogy  Annenberg  World-Cultures  Teachers'-Domain  Life-Science  Bioscience  Identity 
may 2013
Little Red Riding Hood: Charles Perrault - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/29/2013
"Little Red Riding Hood", also known as "Little Red Cap" or simply "Red Riding Hood", is a French and later European fairy tale about a young girl and a Big Bad Wolf. The story has been changed considerably in its history and subject to numerous modern adaptations and readings. The story was first published by Charles Perrault.
Library-of-Resources  Masterpieces  Perrault  French-Heritage  Mother-Goose  Film  Animation  Children's-Literature 
may 2013
Brown vs. Board of Education - LIBRARY OF RESOUCES
05/27/2013
Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students unconstitutional. The decision overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson decision of 1896 which allowed state-sponsored segregation. Handed down on May 17, 1954, the Warren Court's unanimous (9–0) decision stated that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution. This ruling paved the way for integration and was a major victory of the civil rights movement.
Library-of-Resources  Constitution  Black-Heritage  Brown-v-Board  Plessy-v-Ferguson  Civil-Rights  American-History  Teachers'-Domain  National-Museum-of-American-History  Jim-Crow-Laws  Library-of-Congress  Eisenhower  Johnson  Kennedy  Racial-Hatred  Segregation 
may 2013
Hunt for the Supertwister - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/22/2013
On May 3, 1999, one of the most powerful tornadoes ever recorded carved a path of complete destruction near Oklahoma City. To scientists, the supertwister held sobering lessons about the future for rapidly expanding cities in tornado-threatened areas. Most tornadoes form suddenly and with little warning. But now meteorologists are on the verge of a breakthrough that may solve the puzzle of how these killer storms spawn and where they are likely to strike. NOVA follows stormchasers as they probe the tornado's deadly secrets.
Library-of-Resources  Tornadoes  Oklahoma  NOVA  PBS  Disasters  National-Weather-Service  NOAA  NASA  Weather  Hurricanes  Floods  Earthquakes 
may 2013
Chemistry of Water - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/20/2013
Water (H2O) is the most abundant compound on Earth's surface, covering about 70 percent of the planet. In nature, water exists in liquid, solid, and gaseous states. It is in dynamic equilibrium between the liquid and gas states at standard temperature and pressure. At room temperature, it is a tasteless and odorless liquid, nearly colorless with a hint of blue. Many substances dissolve in water and it is commonly referred to as the universal solvent. Because of this, water in nature and in use is rarely pure and some of its properties may vary slightly from those of the pure substance. However, there are also many compounds that are essentially, if not completely, insoluble in water. Water is the only common substance found naturally in all three common states of matter and it is essential for all life on Earth. Water usually makes up 55% to 78% of the human body.
Library-of-Resources  National-Science-Foundation  Life-Science  Water  Chemistry  Biochemistry 
may 2013
Percussion on Video - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/19/2013
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles), or struck, scraped or rubbed by hand, or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.

The percussion section of an orchestra, however, traditionally contains in addition many instruments that are not, strictly speaking, percussion, such as whistles and sirens. On the other hand, keyboard instruments such as the celesta are not normally part of the percussion section, but keyboard percussion instruments (which do not have keyboards) are included.

Percussion instruments are most commonly divided into two classes: Pitched percussion instruments, which produce notes with an identifiable pitch, and unpitched percussion instruments, which produce notes without an identifiable pitch.
Library-of-Resources  Percussion  Folklife  Classical-Music  Jazz-Music  World-Cultures  Smithsonian-Folkways  Annenberg  Teachers'-Domain  Library-of-Congress  Kennedy-Center 
may 2013
Walk to Beautiful - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/19/2013
In the award-winning documentary, "A Walk to Beautiful," a difficult journey that begins in hopelessness and shame for thousands of women in Ethiopia ends in a productive new life. The film tells the personal stories of rural women who make their way to Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, seeking treatment for obstetric fistula, a life-shattering complication of childbirth. Filmed in a starkly beautiful landscape, the documentary juxtaposes the isolated lives of village women who are outcasts because of their medical condition, with the faraway hospital that offers a miracle after a long and arduous trek—a "walk to beautiful."
Library-of-Resources  PBS  NOVA  Mother's-Day  Public-Health  World-Problems  Ethiopia  Kristof  Childbirth  Africa  Fistula  United-Nations 
may 2013
Julia Child - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/15/2013
Julia Carolyn Child (née McWilliams; August 15, 1912 – August 13, 2004) was an American chef, author, and television personality. She is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public with her debut cookbook, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and her subsequent television programs, the most notable of which was The French Chef, which premiered in 1963.
Child  Food  PBS  Library-of-Resources  French-Heritage  Recipes  American-Life  National-Museum-of-American-History 
may 2013
Hidden Treasures at the Library of Congress - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/13/2013
This series of videos offers an unprecedented look at original objects stored at the Library of Congress. The videos are a collaborative effort between the LOC and the History Channel. It offers the story behind the actual objects viewed; historical objects such as a Gutenberg Bible to a rubber relief map of Omaha Beach used for the D-Day invasion. Each brief episode focuses on a specific topic and gives a view into hidden treasures of the LOC. Absolutely engrossing and educational.
Library-of-Resources  Library-of-Congress  Artifacts  American-History 
may 2013
Citizenship and Participation - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/11/2013
iCivics prepares young Americans to become knowledgeable, engaged 21st century citizens by creating free and innovative educational materials.

In 2009, Justice Sandra Day O’Connor founded iCivics to reverse Americans’ declining civic knowledge and participation. Securing our democracy, she realized, requires teaching the next generation to understand and respect our system of governance. Today iCivics comprises not just our board and staff, but also a national leadership team of state supreme court justices, secretaries of state, and educational leaders and a network of committed volunteers. Together, we are committed to passing along our legacy of democracy to the next generation.
Library-of-Resources  O'Connor  Civics  Debate  American-Life  Civil-Rights  Civility  Human-Rights  United-Nations  World-Problems  Constitution  Curriculum  iCivics  Games  Government  American-History  Economics  Bill-of-Rights  Brown-v-Board 
may 2013
We Shall Remain - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/11/2013
From the award-winning PBS series American Experience comes We Shall Remain, a provocative multi-media project that establishes Native history as an essential part of American history.

At the heart of the project is a five-part television series that shows how Native peoples valiantly resisted expulsion from their lands and fought the extinction of their culture -- from the Wampanoags of New England in the 1600s who used their alliance with the English to weaken rival tribes, to the bold new leaders of the 1970s who harnessed the momentum of the civil rights movement to forge a pan-Indian identity. We Shall Remain represents an unprecedented collaboration between Native and non-Native filmmakers and involves Native advisors and scholars at all levels of the project.
Library-of-Resources  Native-American-Heritage  American-History  PBS  American-Experience  World-Cultures  Civil-Rights  Identity  National-Endowment-of-the-Humanities  EDSITEment  Smithsonian-Folkways  Protest-Songs 
may 2013
State Maps - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/10/2013
Geography is spatial – so why not learn it spatially? Reading that Virginia is north ("on top of") North Carolina does not stick in the mind very well. Seeing a picture is better, and moving the states around on a map is better still. It is easier to remember and more meaningful. Give your child a picture of the world that she will always have in her mind. From history books to the nightly news, or the Net, your child will know the WHERE of important events.
Geography  Maps  Library-of-Resources  Games  Maps-of-States 
may 2013
Odyssey: Homer | Black Odyssey: Romare Bearden - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
05/06/2013
The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The poem is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second oldest extant work of Western literature, the Iliad being the oldest. It is believed to have been composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.

The poem mainly centers on the Greek hero Odysseus (known as Ulysses in Roman myths) and his journey home after the fall of Troy. It takes Odysseus ten years to reach Ithaca after the ten-year Trojan War. In his absence, it is assumed he has died, and his wife Penelope and son Telemachus must deal with a group of unruly suitors, the Mnesteres or Proci, who compete for Penelope's hand in marriage.
Masterpieces  Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Bearden  Poetry  Mythology  Hellenic-Culture  World-Literature  World-Cultures  Black-Heritage  Homer  Chagall  Jewish-Heritage  Artworks  Greek  World-Language  Smithsonian-Folkways 
may 2013
Jamestown - PRIMARY SOURCE SET
05/01/2013
Jamestown was a settlement in the Colony of Virginia, the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. Established by the Virginia Company of London as "James Fort" on May 14, 1607, it followed several earlier failed attempts, including the Lost Colony of Roanoke. Jamestown served as the capital of the colony for 83 years, from 1616 until 1699.

The settlement was located within the territory of a political entity known as Tsenacommacah, the state of the Powhatan Confederacy, with around 14,000 native inhabitants, and specifically was in part of the subdivision known as the Paspahegh tribe. The natives initially welcomed the colonists with dancing, feasting and tobacco ceremonies, and they provided crucial provisions and support for the survival of the colonists, who were not agriculturally inclined, although relations with the newcomers also soured fairly early on, leading to the total annihilation of the Paspahegh in warfare within 3 years.

Within a year of Jamestown's founding, the Virginia Company brought Polish and Dutch colonists to help improve the settlement. In 1619, the first documented Africans were brought to Jamestown, though the modern conception of slavery in the future United States did not begin in Virginia until 1660.
Primary-Source-Set  Virginia  American-History  American-Journeys  Jamestown  Native-American-Heritage  Library-of-Congress 
may 2013
Rediscovering Biology - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/25/2013
Great advances have been made in the field of biology in recent decades that will continue to have a major impact on our lives. Rediscovering Biology: Molecular to Global Perspectives explains these developments for teachers of high school biology to update their content knowledge and understanding. The multimedia course materials — video, online text, interactive Web activities, and course guide — will help new and veteran biology teachers become familiar with current research methods and tools that will lead to new discoveries in the coming decades. Thirteen half-hour video programs feature interviews with expert scientists involved in groundbreaking research, such as Eric Lander of the MIT Genomics Center and Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation. Detailed animations provide a micro-level view of biological processes and techniques such as mass spectrometry and microarray analysis. Supporting and expanding the video content, the course guide and interactive Web site provide learning activities, additional information, a detailed glossary, annotated animations, and case studies that invite teachers to run their own mini research projects. An extensive online text, downloadable for printing, covers the content participants need to know for the 13 units.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Bioscience  Genetics  DNA  Evolution  Microbiology  Disease  Neuroscience  Diversity  High-School-Workshop 
april 2013
Map Libraries - LIBRARY OF LIBRARIES
04/22/2013
A map is a visual representation of an area – a symbolic depiction highlighting relationships between elements of that space such as objects, regions, and themes.

Many maps are static two-dimensional, geometrically accurate (or approximately accurate) representations of three-dimensional space, while others are dynamic or interactive, even three-dimensional. Although most commonly used to depict geography, maps may represent any space, real or imagined, without regard to context or scale; e.g. brain mapping, DNA mapping and extraterrestrial mapping.
Maps  Maps-of-Countries  Library-of-Libraries  Library-of-Congress  Artworks 
april 2013
Poetry Everywhere - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/18/2013
WGBH and David Grubin Productions, in association with the Poetry Foundation, undertook this project in order to expose a diverse audience to a broad spectrum of poetic voices, build an appreciation and an audience for poetry, and increase the presence of poets and poetry within the two most ubiquitous media in American popular culture–the Web and TV. In addition to presentation on this Web site, the videos will appear on local public television stations at unexpected moments during their broadcast schedules. The partners hope that poetry will become a permanent part of the PBS landscape, offering moments of meditation and even revelation throughout the day.
Library-of-Resources  Poetry  Teachers'-Domain  Animation  PBS  Children's-Literature 
april 2013
Women's Empowerment - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/17/2013
Examine key social and political issues impacting women through curriculum and supporting video modules for the acclaimed documentaries WAITING FOR THE REVOLUTION, SHADYA, SHAYFEEN.COM: We’re Watching You and TAKING ROOT. From an indigenous Bolivian leader fighting for labor rights to a young Israeli Arab karate champion with feminist ideas, from three Egyptian women working for fair elections, to a Kenyan woman leading a nationwide environmental movement, these four documentaries explore stories of women's empowerment and leadership around the world.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  Independent-Lens  Women's-History  Human-Rights  Muslim-Heritage  Bolivia  Kenya  Egyptian-Heritage  Labor  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop  Film 
april 2013
This Is the Day: The March on Washington: Leonard Freed - PRIMARY SOURCE SET
04/15/2013
This Is the Day: The March on Washington, which will be published by Getty Publications in February 2013 to coincide with Black History Month and the 50th anniversary of the march, presents Magnum photographer Leonard Freed's powerful visual testimony of the event that culminated in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s prophetic "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered at the base of the Lincoln Memorial. The 75 photographs in this powerful volume, most of them never before published, were chosen from hundreds of images Freed made in the nation's capital that day before, during, and after the march. These images present spectacular wide-angle views of the hundreds of thousands of marchers overflowing the National Mall, intimate group portraits of people straining to see the speakers, and tight close-ups of individual faces filled with hope and yearning, as epitomized by a young woman who throws her entire being into singing "We Shall Overcome."
Primary-Source-Set  Masterpieces  Black-Heritage  King  Photography  American-History  Washington-DC  Library-of-Congress  Freed 
april 2013
Poetry of America: LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/14/2013
The “Poetry of America” initiative is part of the Poetry and Literature Center’s 75th Anniversary celebration. Through two features, “Poetry of American Identity” and “Poetry of American History,” this initiative explores how poetry connects to the following themes: immigration and migration, work and industry, social change, and peace and war.

A series of essays by leaders in the literary field, including former Poets Laureate Consultants in Poetry, that illustrate how poems by Americans helped define or expand the country. This presenatation aims to complement conventional historical texts and showcase poetry’s place as an essential tool for recording our nation’s past.

A collection of field recordings by a wide range of award-winning contemporary poets. Each poet reads a singular American poem of his or her choosing, and also speaks to how the poem connects, deepens, or re-imagines our sense of the nation. The feature includes a print version of the poem to complement the recording, as well as a piece by the participating poet.
Library-of-Congress  Library-of-Resources  Poetry  American-History  Identity  Immigration  Migrants  Workforce  Labor  War 
april 2013
Classic Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/11/2013
The Classic series is an enjoyable introduction to the diverse repertoire of American music available from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. Each explores the breadth and depth of a genre while the notes trace its significance within American musical heritage. Longtime lovers of American roots music and newcomers alike find value and enjoyment in the Classic series. Compiled and annotated by GRAMMY award winning Smithsonian Folkways Archivist Jeff Place, award winning bluegrass radio presenter Lee Michael Demsey, blues historian Barry Lee Pearson, and others, the series has produced compilations of bluegrass, folk, blues, maritime, old-time, and mountain music.
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Folkways  Black-Heritage  Gospel-Music  Ballads  Appalachian  Blues  Bluegrass  Canada  Irish-Heritage  Celtic-Heritage  Folksongs  Labor  Maritime-Heritage  Mountain-Songs  Violin  Banjo  Guitar  Piano  Protest-Songs  Railroad  New-Orleans 
april 2013
Uganda Folkways - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/10/2013
Uganda, officially the Republic of Uganda, is a landlocked country in East Africa. Uganda is bordered on the east by Kenya, on the north by South Sudan, on the west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, on the southwest by Rwanda, and on the south by Tanzania. The southern part of the country includes a substantial portion of Lake Victoria, shared with Kenya and Tanzania.

Uganda takes its name from the Buganda kingdom, which encompasses a large portion of the south of the country including the capital Kampala. The people of Uganda were hunter-gatherers until 1,700 to 2,300 years ago, when Bantu-speaking populations migrated to the southern parts of the country. The area was ruled by the British beginning in the late 1800s. Uganda gained independence from Britain on 9 October 1962. The period since then has been marked by intermittent conflicts, most recently a civil war against the Lord's Resistance Army.

The official languages are Swahili and English. Luganda, a southern language, is widely spoken across the country, although multiple other languages are spoken in the country. The current President of Uganda is Yoweri Kaguta Museveni.
Library-of-Resources  Library-of-Congress  Smithsonian-Folkways  Black-Heritage  Africa  Swahili  Folksongs  Uganda  World-Cultures  Child-Soldiers  Coffee  Luganda 
april 2013
Heritage Book-Making - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/20/2013
The Smithsonian has joined with book artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a series of easy-to-do book projects designed to get families talking and creating together. Click on any of these demos and accompanying downloadable instructions to make your own “family memory” storybook!
Library-of-Resources  Smithsonian-Education  Mazumdar  Book-Making  Family-Heritage  Storytelling  American-Life 
march 2013
Private Universe - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/20/2013
With its famous opening scene at a Harvard graduation, this classic of education research brings into sharp focus the dilemma facing all educators: Why don't even the brightest students truly grasp basic science concepts? This award-winning program traces the problem through interviews with Harvard graduates and their professors, as well as with a bright ninth-grader who has some confused ideas about the orbits of the planets. Equally useful for education methods classes, teacher workshops, and presentations to the public, A Private Universe is an essential resource for science and methodology teachers.
Library-of-Resources  College-Workshop  Education  Annenberg  High-School-Workshop  Smithsonian-Education  National-Science-Foundation  Harvard  Math-Inservice  Science-Education  Elementary-School-Workshop  Middle-School-Workshop  Mind 
march 2013
Live from Lincoln Center - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/20/2013
Live From Lincoln Center brings broadcasts of live performances of music, drama, and dance direct from the stages of Lincoln Center in New York City into homes across America and around the world. Presenting work by the world's premier performers, the Emmy Award–winning program invites the television audience to experience live performance with all the intimacy and immediacy of being right on stage.
Library-of-Resources  New-York  Lincoln-Center  Opera-Musical  PBS 
march 2013
Weimar Republic - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/18/2013
The Weimar Republic (German: Weimarer Republik) is the name given by historians to the federal republic and parliamentary representative democracy established in 1919 in Germany to replace the imperial form of government. It was named after Weimar, the city where the constitutional assembly took place.

Following World War I, the republic emerged from the German Revolution in November 1918. In 1919, a national assembly was convened in Weimar, where a new constitution for the German Reich was written, then adopted on 11 August of that same year. The ensuing period of liberal democracy lapsed by 1930, when Hindenburg assumed dictatorial emergency powers, leading to the ascent of the nascent Nazi Party and Adolf Hitler in 1933. The legal measures taken by the new Nazi government in February and March 1933, commonly known as the machtergreifung (seizure of power) meant that the government could legislate contrary to the constitution. The republic nominally continued to exist until 1945, as the constitution was never formally repealed, but the measures taken by the Nazis in the early part of their rule rendered the constitution irrelevant. Thus, 1933 is usually seen as the end of the Weimar Republic and the beginning of Hitler's Third Reich.
Library-of-Resources  Germany  Nazis  World-History  World-War-I  World-War-II  Weimar-Republic 
march 2013
Makers: Women Who Make America - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/17/2013
Makers: Women Who Make America is a 2013 documentary film about the struggle for women's equality in the United States during the last five decades of the 20th century. The film was narrated by Meryl Streep and distributed by the Public Broadcasting Service as a three part, three hour television documentary in February 2013. Makers features interviews with women from all social strata, from politicians like Hillary Rodham Clinton and television stars like Ellen DeGeneres and Oprah Winfrey, to flight attendants, coal miners and phone company workers.
PBS  Women's-History  American-History  Library-of-Resources  Human-Rights 
march 2013
Big Bill Broonzy: Folksinger and Blues Singer - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
03/17/2013
Big Bill Broonzy (June 26, 1893 – August 15, 1958) was a prolific American blues singer, songwriter and guitarist. His career began in the 1920s when he played country blues to mostly African-American audiences. Through the ‘30s and ‘40s he successfully navigated a transition in style to a more urban blues sound popular with working class African-American audiences. In the 1950s a return to his traditional folk-blues roots made him one of the leading figures of the emerging American folk music revival and an international star. His long and varied career marks him as one of the key figures in the development of blues music in the 20th century.
Library-of-Resources  Folksongs  Smithsonian-Folkways  Blues  Broonzy  Guitar  Black-Heritage  Library-of-Congress 
march 2013
Destinos: An Introduction to Spanish - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
02/28/2013
In Destinos: An Introduction to Spanish, lawyer Raquel Rodríguez travels to Spain, Argentina, Puerto Rico, and finally to Mexico, all to solve a secret from Don Fernando's past. Destinos is in conversational Spanish, with some narration in English and in Spanish. Every episode covers new grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and cultural practices, with a review at the end. As you go from episode to episode and destination to destination, the content grows more challenging.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Spanish  Mexico  Argentina  Puerto-Rico  Spain  Hispanic-Heritage  World-Cultures  World-Language 
march 2013
Everyday Mysteries - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
02/28/2013
Did you ever wonder why a camel has a hump? If you can really tell the weather by listening to the chirp of a cricket? Or why our joints make popping sounds? These questions deal with everyday phenomena that we often take for granted, but each can be explained scientifically.

Everyday Mysteries will help you get the answers to these and many other of life's most interesting questions through scientific inquiry.
Library-of-Congress  Life-Science  Library-of-Resources  Science-Education 
february 2013
Smithsonian Folkways Lesson Plans - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
02/13/2013
Smithsonian Folkways Recordings launched its Smithsonian Global Sound®educational initiative in 2005. This unique online resource delivers easy access to tens of thousands of audio recordings and hundreds of video features from the U.S. national museum's Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections (which includes Smithsonian Folkways) and content from partner archives including the International Library of African Music at Willard Rhodes University (South Africa), the Archives and Research Centre for Ethnomusicology of the American Institute for Indian Studies (India), the Aga Khan Music Initiative for Central Asia of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (Central Asia) and others still to come.
Smithsonian-Folkways  Smithsonian-Education  Folklife  Folklore  Folksongs  World-Cultures  American-Life  Music-Inservice  Dance 
february 2013
In Search of the Novel - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/22/2013
Discover creative strategies for bringing novels to life for middle and high school students with this workshop, featuring the words and works of 10 novelists, including Charles Dickens, Mary Shelley, J. K. Rowling, and Toni Morrison. Within the framework of real classroom practice, the workshop offers interviews with contemporary authors, literary critics, teachers, and students, as well as film clips from adaptations of the novels featured. In Search of the Novel poses basic questions that can help you examine the genre from multiple perspectives and bring it to life for your students.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Middle-School-Workshop  High-School-Workshop  English-Literature  Literacy-and-Reading 
january 2013
In Performance at the White House - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/21/2013
In Performance at The White House was created to showcase the rich fabric of American culture in the setting of the nation's most famous home. Since 1978, the program has embraced virtually every genre of American performance art.
Library-of-Resources  Library-of-Congress  PBS  Gershwin  Civil-Rights  Black-Heritage  American-Life  American-History 
january 2013
Silent Spring: Rachel Carson - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
01/16/2013
Silent Spring is a book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on September 27, 1962. The book is widely credited with helping launch the contemporary American environmental movement. The book documented detrimental effects of pesticides on the environment, particularly on birds. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation, and public officials of accepting industry claims uncritically.
Library-of-Resources  Ecology  Environment  Earth-Day  Masterpieces  Our-Story  National-Museum-of-American-History  Women's-History  American-History  Lawlor  Carson  Birds  Nature 
january 2013
Reading Rainbow - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
04/20/2013
First aired in 1983, Reading Rainbow is an award-winning PBS kid's program designed to promote independent reading. Hosted by LeVar Burton, each episode contains an illustrated feature book narrated by a popular entertainer. The magazine-style show also includes book reviews, interviews, and other features starring regular, real-life kids. The show started as a summer TV program to keep kids reading while school was out. In 1990, the series was broadcast year-round. Reading Rainbow is recommended for kids aged four to eight.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  Children's-Literature  Burton  Literacy-and-Reading  American-Life  American-History  Reading-Rainbow 
january 2013
NASA and LOC - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/06/2012
NASA and the Library of Congress have established the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA-Library of Congress chair in Astrobiology at the Library's scholarly research organization, the John W. Kluge Center in Washington. The chair is named for the late Nobel Laureate and founding director of the NASA Astrobiology Institute, Baruch "Barry" Blumberg.

Astrobiology is the study of the origins, evolution, distribution and future of life in the universe. Astrobiology addresses three fundamental questions: How did life begin and evolve? Is there life elsewhere? What is the future of life on Earth and beyond?
NASA  Library-of-Congress  Webcasts  Astrobiology  Universe 
december 2012
Great Performances - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/28/2012
Great Performances brings the best in the performing arts from across America and around the world to a US television audience. It presents a diverse programming portfolio of classical music, opera, popular song, musical theater, dance, drama, and performance documentaries.
Library-of-Resources  Classical-Music  PBS  Great-Performances  Jazz-Music  Ballet  Shakespeare  Tragedy  Opera-Musical 
december 2012
American Experience - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/26/2012
Praised as the "finest documentary series on television," AMERICAN EXPERIENCE brings to life the compelling stories from our past that inform our understanding of the world today.
American-Experience  American-History  American-Life  PBS  Library-of-Resources  Presidents 
december 2012
Museum in a Box - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/26/2012
The Museum in a Box program brings the physical sciences of flight to students in grades K-12. Great for educators at museums, science centers and schools, Museum in a Box provides exciting hands-on/minds-on lessons with an aeronautics theme to inspire future scientists, mathematicians and engineers. The lessons are tied to all national science and math standards.
Library-of-Resources  NASA  Flight  Science-Education  Aviation  Technology-and-Engineering  Mathematics 
december 2012
American Masters - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/23/2012
American Masters, Thirteen/WNET’s award-winning biography series, celebrates our arts and culture. Created and launched in 1986 by Executive Producer Susan Lacy, the series set the standard for documentary film profiles, accruing widespread critical acclaim – 50 Emmy nominations and 23 awards – including for Outstanding Primetime Non-Fiction Series in 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009 and 2011 – the 2012 Producers Guild Award for Outstanding Producer of Non-Fiction Television; an Oscar, three Grammys and 12 Peabody Awards.
Library-of-Resources  PBS  American-History  American-Life 
december 2012
Connecting With the Arts: A Teaching Practices Library, 6-8 - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/21/2012
Connecting With the Arts: A Teaching Practices Library, 6-8 includes 12 half-hour programs that feature a variety of meaningful arts integration approaches taking place in middle school classrooms around the country. The programs provide windows into classrooms around the country where teachers have already incorporated arts integration strategies into their work. Programs feature extensive classroom sequences and teachers telling their own stories. In each program, arts specialists and subject-area teachers will find ideas and projects they can take back to their own classrooms, as well as insights into planning and implementing an integrated curriculum.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Dance  Music-Inservice  Theatre  Middle-School-Workshop  Visual-Arts 
december 2012
Library of Congress Magazine - PRIMARY SOURCE SET
12/102012
Library of Congress Magazine (LCM) is published bimonthly to tell the Library’s stories, to showcase its many talented staff, and to share and promote the use of the resources of the world’s largest library.
Library-of-Congress  American-History  American-Life  Primary-Source-Set 
december 2012
Thanksgiving Library - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
12/01/2012
Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated primarily in the United States and Canada. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. It is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and on the second Monday of October in Canada. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, but today is celebrated in a more secular manner.
Library-of-Resources  Library-of-Congress  NPR  Annenberg  Holidays  Thanksgiving  Native-American-Heritage  American-History  American-Life  American-Experience 
december 2012
Biography of America - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
11/30/2012
A Biography of America presents history not simply as a series of irrefutable facts to be memorized, but as a living narrative. Prominent historians -- Donald L. Miller, Pauline Maier, Louis P. Masur, Waldo E. Martin, Jr., Douglas Brinkley, and Virginia Scharff -- present America's story as something that is best understood from a variety of perspectives. Thought-provoking debates and lectures encourage critical analysis of the forces that have shaped America. First-person narratives, photos, film footage, and documents reveal the human side of American history -- how historical figures affected events, and the impact of these events on citizens' lives.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Library-of-Congress  National-Archives  American-History  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop  Social-Studies-Inservice 
november 2012
Brain: Teaching Modules - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
11/29/2012
Developed from the original series The Brain, these flexible resources offer extensive footage and research into the inner workings of this amazing human organ, including findings on Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism, Parkinson's disease, and many other topics. The modules are appropriate for use in general and advanced courses in psychology, abnormal and physiological psychology, neuropsychology, and occupational therapy.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Psychology  Social-Studies-Inservice  High-School-Workshop  College-Workshop  Neuroscience  Disease  Brain 
november 2012
Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
11/29/2912
Developing Writers: A Workshop for High School Teachers presents practical and philosophical advice for teaching writing, while examining issues every teacher faces — such as high-stakes assessments and dealing with differently abled students. Eight video programs feature teachers in diverse classrooms around the country who are helping their students grow as skilled and effective writers. Participants will observe how the teachers and their students work together to create writing communities. Professional writers will share their processes as they move from initial concepts to publication, and comments from researchers, theorists, students, and teachers add context. A workshop guide and Web site provide activities and additional information to help participants develop effective instructional strategies to bring back to the classroom.
Library-of-Resources  Annenberg  Writing  High-School-Workshop 
november 2012
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