Mermaid
A simple markdown-like script language for generating charts from text via javascript.
utility 
yesterday
How not to structure your database-backed web applications: a study of performance bugs in the wild
This is a fascinating study of the problems people get into when using ORMs to handle persistence concerns in their web applications. The authors study real-world applications and distil a catalogue of common performance anti-patterns. There are a bunch of familiar things in the list, and a few that surprised me with the amount of difference they can make. By fixing many of the issues that they find, Yang et al., are able to quantify how many lines of code it takes to address the issue, and what performance improvement the fix delivers.
programming 
19 days ago
Physics as a Way of Thinking
There is always before us one supreme question. From
what angle may we view the physical and social world so that
it may be reasonably intelligible, so that we may feel a friendly
relation to it and accept it as our home. The Buddhist finds
his answer in a toleration for what he may neither understand
nor alter. The Greeks like others under similar conditions
asked this question and replied with a lucidity peculiar to themselves,
"It is something like myself." In such an answer there
is no attempt to rise above immediate human needs and satisfactions
and to find universal relations which are independent
of time and space. The physical scientist on the other hand
must thrust aside all personal and social implications of the
physical world and address himself to finding order and system
among physical phenomena. Here it is proposed to look at
some of the more essential characteristics of physical thinking,
to trace the way in which they have developed and to suggest
how this way of thinking may have validity in other fields of
thought. Approached in this way, physics is considered not as
a framework which determines our material environment but
as a type of thinking which penetrates our intellectual atmosphere
- not as a record of achievements and tendencies but as
an indication of essential characteristics of the human mind in
its attempt to build around itself an ordered and organized
universe which will be an agreeable intellectual habitation.
life 
21 days ago
The Plane That Flew Itself – After The Pilot Ejected, This F-106A Flew for Miles Before Landing Gently in a Field!
In 1970, a plane got fed up with its pilot so it hatched an audacious plan. First, get rid of the pilot. Second: land. Third: enter history. The result was amazing.
technology 
21 days ago
East vs West
Two girls foot dancing, two boys beating each other with sticks.
life 
24 days ago
How to Fall Asleep in 2 Minutes or Less
Have you ever unexpectedly found yourself with a snatch of time in which to steal a nap? You tried to settle into the chair or nook in which you found yourself, closed your eyes, and then . . . you just sat there, drowsy but awake. Despite feeling quite tired, you couldn’t fall asleep, and soon the time was up before you had gotten in so much as a wink. Talk about frustrating! Not only did you not get to nap, you didn’t do anything else either; if you weren’t going to fall asleep, you could have done something productive instead!
life 
24 days ago
Number One Soft Skill for Programmers: Emotional Control
If you are a follower of Simple Programmer, you probably have heard of John Sonmez’s book, Soft Skills: The Software Developer’s Life Manual. In it, he explains some life skills you need as a developer in order to be a better person and developer overall.
life 
28 days ago
Families In A Maya Village In Mexico May Have The Secret To Getting Kids To Do Chores : Goats and Soda : NPR
Gaskins was so impressed by the girls' enthusiasm for helping around the house that she started to study how kids in the village spend their time. She quickly realized that the young kids not only made big contributions to household chores, but also that they often did so without being told. In fact, many times, helping out was their idea.
life 
4 weeks ago
Command-line Tools can be 235x Faster than your Hadoop Cluster
As I was browsing the web and catching up on some sites I visit periodically, I found a cool article from Tom Hayden about using Amazon Elastic Map Reduce (EMR) and mrjob in order to compute some statistics on win/loss ratios for chess games he downloaded from the millionbase archive, and generally have fun with EMR. Since the data volume was only about 1.75GB containing around 2 million chess games, I was skeptical of using Hadoop for the task, but I can understand his goal of learning and having fun with mrjob and EMR. Since the problem is basically just to look at the result lines of each file and aggregate the different results, it seems ideally suited to stream processing with shell commands. I tried this out, and for the same amount of data I was able to use my laptop to get the results in about 12 seconds (processing speed of about 270MB/sec), while the Hadoop processing took about 26 minutes (processing speed of about 1.14MB/sec).
architecture 
7 weeks ago
Software Complexity Is Killing Us
Since the dawn of time (before software, there was only darkness), there has been one constant: businesses want to build software cheaper and faster. It is certainly an understandable and laudable goal – especially if you’ve spent any time around software developers. It is a goal that every engineer should support wholeheartedly, and we should always strive to create things as efficiently as possible, given the constraints of our situation.
architecture 
7 weeks ago
Why Swift for TensorFlow?
The core graph program extraction algorithm, automatic differentiation, and Python language interoperability features of Swift for TensorFlow can be implemented for other programming languages, and we are occasionally asked why we didn’t use some other one for this project.
proglang 
7 weeks ago
Don't use Hadoop - your data isn't that big
"So, how much experience do you have with Big Data and Hadoop?" they asked me. I told them that I use Hadoop all the time, but rarely for jobs larger than a few TB. I'm basically a big data neophite - I know the concepts, I've written code, but never at scale.
architecture 
7 weeks ago
The Christian Humanist
Christian Humanism is the belief that human freedom, individual conscience, rational inquiry, and a commitment to the values taught by Jesus as a guide to the ethical life are not only compatible with Christianity, they are fundamental to a proper understanding and interpretation of Christian belief. Being a Christian means at the least feeding the hungry, housing the homeless, healing the sick, supporting the poor, comforting the lonely, seeking peace and standing with the powerless against the mighty.
life 
march 2018
How to Fall Asleep in 2 Minutes or Less
Have you ever unexpectedly found yourself with a snatch of time in which to steal a nap? You tried to settle into the chair or nook in which you found yourself, closed your eyes, and then . . . you just sat there, drowsy but awake. Despite feeling quite tired, you couldn’t fall asleep, and soon the time was up before you had gotten in so much as a wink. Talk about frustrating! Not only did you not get to nap, you didn’t do anything else either; if you weren’t going to fall asleep, you could have done something productive instead!
life 
march 2018
How knowing Lisp destroyed my programming career
The conclusion was inescapable: the problem wasn't Perl or C++ or Java, it was me. I just wasn't a very good programmer any more. Lisp's power had made me complacent, and the world had passed me by. Looking back, I actually don't think I was ever a very good programmer. I just happened to have the good fortune to recognize a good thing when I saw it, and used the resulting leverage to build a successful career. But I credit much of my success to the people who designed Common Lisp.
life 
march 2018
7 Practical Tips for Cheating at Design
Every web developer inevitably runs into situations where they need to make visual design decisions, whether they like it or not. Maybe the company you work for doesn’t have a full-time designer and you need to implement the UI for a new feature on your own. Or maybe you’re hacking on a side-project and you want it to look better than yet-another-Bootstrap-site.
design 
february 2018
Ten Reasons Why I Don't Like Golang
When I first started programming in Go, my summary of it was, “The good things are great and the bad things are weird and I can live with them.” After another three years and a few large projects in Go, I no longer like the language and wouldn’t use it for a new project. Here are 10 reasons why, in no particular order.
proglang 
february 2018
Does Depression Have an Evolutionary Purpose?
One in six Americans will suffer a major depressive disorder at some point in life.1 That word—disorder—characterizes how most of us see depression. It’s a breakdown, a flaw in the system, something to be remedied and moved past. Some psychologists, however, have argued that depression is not a dysfunction at all, but an evolved mechanism designed to achieve a particular set of benefits. I’ve certainly considered whether it’s done that for me, both in high school and later in life. If they’re right, it means that our thinking about depression needs an intervention too.
life 
january 2018
REST is the new SOAP
Then came REST. REpresentational State Transfer. A wave of renewal shook the foundations of inter-services communication. RPC was dead, the future was RESTful: resources living each on its own URL, and manipulated exclusively through HTTP protocol. From then on, every API we had to expose or consume became a new challenge; not to say a testimony to insanity.
architecture 
january 2018
Reality has a surprising amount of detail
This means it’s really easy to get stuck. Stuck in your current way of seeing and thinking about things. Frames are made out of the details that seem important to you. The important details you haven’t noticed are invisible to you, and the details you have noticed seem completely obvious and you see right through them. This all makes makes it difficult to imagine how you could be missing something important.
life 
january 2018
The hidden costs of serverless
Like the jump from on-premises to the cloud, the move to Serverless is more or less inevitable. Also like the jump from on-premises to the cloud — this move could come with some surprising bills.
architecture 
january 2018
Spas Are Just Harder, And Always Will Be
There's quite a lot of talk these days about Single Page Applications (SPAs) and the terrific user experience they deliver. This is great, and the SPA architecture is probably a good fit for many apps, but I want to point out two reasons why SPAs are harder to develop and maintain than traditional server-side web apps, and why they will always be harder regardless of new JavaScript frameworks and other technologies that become available. If you're considering a SPA architecture, remember to weigh this additional difficulty against the user-experience benefits you'll get. For the typical line-of-business app full of big forms and complex data the traditional choice could very well be the right choice.
webdev 
january 2018
Python Concurrency From the Ground Up
David Beazley. PyCon 2015. There are currently three popular approaches to Python concurrency: threads, event loops, and coroutines. Each is shrouded by various degrees of mystery and peril. In this talk, all three approaches will be deconstructed and explained in a epic ground-up live coding battle.
python 
january 2018
The decorators they won't tell you about
You know, decorators are one of the features that makes Python great, but there are a lot of people who either haven't been exposed to them or - worse - have been exposed to them (either in the wild or as part of a tutorial) but never "gotten" them.
python 
january 2018
GOOGLE MAPS’S MOAT
Over the past year, we’ve been comparing Google Maps and Apple Maps in New York, San Francisco, and London—but some of the biggest differences are outside of large cities.
technology 
january 2018
Clever ideas that failed
The cleverness of an idea is proportionate to its odds of failure. Brian Kernighan once said that "debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it." I have built many things that I wasn't smart enough to debug, so now I record them to remind myself not get carried away with something for the sake of being "clever". A few of my best disasters are below.
architecture 
december 2017
A vulnerability by any other name
Heartbleed, POODLE, Shellshock. Giving vulnerabilities names may be controversial, but there's no doubt it's effective. These, and many other, vulnerabilities attracted widespread awareness and drove tons of work improving ecosystem security. Heartbleed drew attention to OpenSSL's small team of maintainers and drove funding and code quality improvements. POODLE led to SSLv3 being disabled on clients and servers nearly overnight. Shellshock directed researchers' attention to bash and resulted in a series of vulnerabilities being discovered.
architecture 
december 2017
I Know What You Download
Torrent downloads and distributions for IP ...
North America United States Louisville HUMANA
... is your IP address.
Computers connected to a network are assigned a unique number known as IP Address. IP addresses consist of four numbers in the range 0-255 separated by periods (i.e. 160.90.158.233). A computer may have either a permanent (static) IP address, or one that is dynamically assigned/leased to it.
Use internet connection of other people (Wi Fi, their computers, tablets and smartphones) to know what they download in torrent network or spy on them via special generated link.
technology 
december 2017
No End in Sight: The Human Cost of Conflict in ‘Star Wars’
With ‘The Last Jedi,’ director Rian Johnson is asking fans to consider the human cost of the never-ending conflict between the dark side and the light
life 
december 2017
3Blue1Brown
3Blue1Brown is a channel about animating math. Check out the "Recommended" playlist for some thought-provoking one-off topics, and take a look at the "Essence of linear algebra" for some more student-focussed material.
science 
december 2017
Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse
A common problem in component frameworks, class libraries, foundation services, and other infrastructure code is that many are designed to be general purpose without reference to concrete applications. This leads to a dizzying array of options and possibilities that are often unused or misused — or just not useful.
architecture 
december 2017
A PUBLIC OPTION FOR FOOD
Does the food system prove that we should privatize public schools? No, it proves that free markets are a disaster…
life 
november 2017
Sex With Emily
Emily Morse is a sex & relationship expert, author, talk show host & Bravo TV star. Sex With Emily is her podcast about sex, relationships and everything in between. As a "sexpert," Emily is known for her non-judgmental advice, accessibility and humor.
podcast 
november 2017
Sexy Marriage Radio
Heat Up Your Marriage Intimacy with Straight Talk & Real Answers
podcast 
november 2017
Welcome To Macintosh
A TINY SHOW ABOUT A BIG FRUIT COMPANY, BY MARK BRAMHILL.
podcast 
november 2017
To Be Continuous
A show all about continuous delivery and software development.
podcast 
november 2017
Software Engineering Radio
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast targeted at the professional software developer. The goal is to be a lasting educational resource, not a newscast. Three to four times per month, we publish a new episode talking to experts from the software engineering world about the full range of topics that matter to professional developers.
podcast 
november 2017
Roll For Initiative
The only & original podcast about 1st Edition Advanced Dungeons and Dragons
podcast 
november 2017
The Moth
Since its launch in 1997, The Moth has presented thousands of stories told live and without notes.
podcast 
november 2017
Intercepted
At Intercepted, our commitment to exposing injustice and holding the powerful accountable couldn’t be any more urgent than it is right now. After our first two seasons, we’ve taken Intercepted ad free. We want our podcast to be powered by the people who care the most about it — our community of listeners. So we’re asking you for your support and inviting you to become a sustaining member of Intercepted. Your support for Intercepted is going straight into making this show better. We have so many ideas on expanding our coverage, doing more original reporting, and seeking new ways to interact with our listeners in the Intercepted community.
podcast 
november 2017
Hanselminutes
My name is Scott Hanselman. I'm a programmer, teacher, and speaker. I work out of my home office in Portland, Oregon for the Web Platform Team at Microsoft, but this blog, its content and opinions are my own. I blog about technology, culture, gadgets, diversity, code, the web, where we're going and where we've been. I'm excited about community, social equity, media, entrepreneurship and above all, the open web.
podcast 
november 2017
Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
A weekly podcast discussing the design, development, and business of great software. Hosted by thoughtbot CEO, Chad Pytel, and rotating cast of fellow developers, designers, and entrepreneurs, we delve deep behind the scenes of the products and technologies we love.
podcast 
november 2017
Freakonomics
Freakonomics Radio is an award-winning weekly podcast (subscribe here!) with 8 million downloads per month. It can also be heard on public radio stations across the country, on SiriusXM, on several major airlines, and elsewhere. Host Stephen J. Dubner has surprising conversations that explore the riddles of everyday life and the weird wrinkles of human nature — from cheating and crime to parenting and sports. Dubner talks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, social scientists and entrepreneurs — and his Freakonomics co-author Steve Levitt. Freakonomics Radio is produced by Dubner Productions and WNYC Studios.
podcast 
november 2017
Dev Game Club
Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary.
podcast 
november 2017
Common Sense
Common Sense with Dan Carlin isn’t a show for everyone, and that’s what makes it so great. It’s a smart, deep, passionate, engaging, inquisitive and of course, politically Martian view of news and current events. There’s nothing else like it.
podcast 
november 2017
Accidental Tech Podcast
A tech podcast we accidentally created while trying to do a car show.
Featuring Marco Arment, Casey Liss, and John Siracusa.
podcast 
november 2017
Coder Radio
A weekly talk show taking a pragmatic look at the art and business of Software Development and related technologies.
podcast 
november 2017
.Net Rocks
.NET Rocks! is a weekly talk show for anyone interested in programming on the Microsoft .NET platform. The shows range from introductory information to hardcore geekiness.
podcast 
november 2017
War College
War College a weekly podcast that covers everything from war to weapons systems, from history to foreign policy to the defense industry.
podcast 
november 2017
Bloomberg Odd Lots
Bloomberg’s Joe Weisenthal and Tracy Alloway take you on a not-so random weekly walk through hot topics in markets, finance and economics.
podcast 
november 2017
The Alternative with Tony Evans
The Urban Alternative is the national ministry of Dr. Tony Evans and is dedicated to restoring hope and transforming lives through the proclamation and application of the Word of God.
podcast 
november 2017
Redundancy vs dependencies: which is worse?
I believe that there are just two intrinsic forces in programming: You want to minimize redundancy and, ideally, define every piece of nowledge once. You want to minimize dependencies – A should depend on B only if it absolutely must.
architecture 
november 2017
The Coming Software Apocalypse
here were six hours during the night of April 10, 2014, when the entire population of Washington State had no 911 service. People who called for help got a busy signal. One Seattle woman dialed 911 at least 37 times while a stranger was trying to break into her house. When he finally crawled into her living room through a window, she picked up a kitchen knife. The man fled.
architecture 
november 2017
Inadequacy and Modesty
This is a book about two incompatible views on the age-old question: “When should I think that I may be able to do something unusually well?”

These two viewpoints tend to give wildly different, nearly cognitively nonoverlapping analyses of questions like:
life 
october 2017
Something Rotten In The Core
There's a key thought of UNIX philosophy which centers around the idea of linking programs together. You know, piping the output from grep into sed and then into sort, that kind of thing. It kinda works well, I guess. For text at least.
architecture 
october 2017
Systems Analysis and Programming: Thoughts from the Attic
But the issue that had the biggest effect on me was the September 1966 on Information (which I read about 40 years ago). The issue featured a terrific collection of authors who are now acknowledged as pioneering leaders in computer science: Evans and Sutherland explaining computer hardware; Fano and Corbato on operating systems; Tony Oettinger describing his natural language parser; and the two giants of my own subfield (Artificial Intelligence), McCarthy and Minsky, on Information Theory and AI. If I had somehow been able to comprehend everything in this issue, I could have cut a decade's time off my education in Computer Science.
programming 
october 2017
What should follow the web?
In part 1 of this series I argued that it’s time to start thinking about how to replace the web. The justifications are poor productivity and unfixable security problems.
architecture 
october 2017
Put Your Husband in the Kitchen
I am tempted to think that the perplexed businessman might discover a possible solution of his troubles if he would just spend a few days in his wife's kitchen.
life 
october 2017
Every Noise at Once
This is an ongoing attempt at an algorithmically-generated, readability-adjusted scatter-plot of the musical genre-space, based on data tracked and analyzed for 1536 genres by Spotify. The calibration is fuzzy, but in general down is more organic, up is more mechanical and electric; left is denser and more atmospheric, right is spikier and bouncier.
life 
october 2017
It’s time to kill the web
For the first time, a meaningful number of developers are openly questioning the web platform. Here’s a representative article and discussion. Here’s another. Yet another. I could list more but if you’re interested enough in programming to be reading this you’ve already read at least one hilarious rant this year about the state of modern web development. This is not one of those articles. I can’t do a better job of mocking the status quo than the poor people who have to live it every day. This is a different kind of article.
architecture 
september 2017
How great leaders inspire action
Simon Sinek has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership -- starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?" His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers ...
leadership 
september 2017
The Hard Thing About Software Development
The most valuable asset in the software industry is the synthesis of programming skill and deep context in the business problem domain, in one skull.
architecture 
july 2017
Preferred Numbers
In industrial design, preferred numbers (also called preferred values, preferred series or convenient numbers[1]) are standard guidelines for choosing exact product dimensions within a given set of constraints. Product developers must choose numerous lengths, distances, diameters, volumes, and other characteristic quantities. While all of these choices are constrained by considerations of functionality, usability, compatibility, safety or cost, there usually remains considerable leeway in the exact choice for many dimensions.
life 
july 2017
My own private basic income
I have a private basic income – a small, regular cash income without means test or work requirement. It’s probably large enough to meet my basic needs. And I got it thanks to privilege, nepotism, and two big lucky breaks.
life 
june 2017
Classification of Character Strengths and Virtues
Character Strengths and Virtues is a groundbreaking handbook that was created built on reports from a prestigious group of researchers who have attempted to create a systematic classification and measurements of widely valued positive traits. The aim was to present a measure of humanist ideals of virtue in an empirical and scientific way.
life 
june 2017
Training Your Brain to Be (and Stay) Happy
What do you need to be happy? If you’ve read a few articles about the roots of happiness, you are probably–and correctly–resisting the urge to say “more money.” Despite our intuition that being richer would doubtlessly make us happier, additional wealth actually does not bring much additional happiness. It’s due to acclimation; we simply adjust to a new norm.
life 
june 2017
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