HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS + 1970   7

Formerly Good Earth - JPG
When Herblock portrayed his John Q. Public figure in a gas mask, standing on a filthy planet Earth overwhelmed by toxic spills, polluted waterways, and unprecedented levels of air pollution, he was showing his support for the passage of the Clean Air Act of 1970 and the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency on December 2, 1970. Reports by researchers who investigated the dumping sites that leached toxins into local food and water supplies had increased public awareness of life-threatening hazards and the need for better care of the earth.
1970 
december 2012 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
Taped - JPG
Long before the Watergate scandals, Herb Block was pointing out excessive use of government power to wiretap or otherwise investigate the activities of citizens an administration felt were at odds with its policies. In 1970, the Civil Service Commission admitted to having a Security Investigations Index with over 10 million entries, and the armed forces revealed surveillance of Americans involved in anti-Vietnam war activities.
1970 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"You see, the reason we're in Indochina is to protect us boys in Indochina" - JPG
Despite Richard Nixon's election campaign promises to end the Vietnam War, each new step widened rather than reduced American involvement.
1970 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"Out, damned 'spots'" - JPG
Herb Block adapted a quote from Shakespeare's Macbeth and depicted an outraged television viewer reacting angrily to the thirty-second television campaign advertisements called "spots." While spot advertisements on television had played a role in political elections since 1952, the amount of money candidates spent on them soared with the 1970 election. Mean-spirited spots, which candidates used to attack their opponents rather than address issues, also increased in number.
1970 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
Haunted House - JPG
Although Herb Block frequently castigated President Richard Nixon and his Republican administration, in this cartoon he reminded the 91st Congress--led by Democrats--that they, too, had considerable skeletons in their closet. In the cartoon's foreground, Block derided the seniority system. The cartoonist later railed: “This is a system not for operating a representative government but for strangling it. It often makes fiefdoms of Congressional committees--fiefdoms in which the people's representatives are subject to the whims of chairmen who have little responsibility to anybody.”
1970 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"A cup of black powder and a few rounds of ammo? Certainly, neighbor” - PDF
In a comical encounter between political extremists on the left and the right, Herblock stresses the common ground they share in the single-minded pursuit of easy, illegal access to firearms. He also carefully differentiates between the ideological allegiances of each figure, despite the amusing similarities between the two in appearance and outlaw status. A firm believer in curbing the availability of arms as a means of saving lives, Herblock tirelessly advocated for strong gun-control legislation.
1970 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS

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