HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS + 1954   9

"Here he comes now" - JPG
Richard Nixon had discovered the power of smear attacks in his early campaigns for the House of Representatives and Senate years before Senator McCarthy began to use them. In 1954, during his vice-presidential campaign for re-election, Nixon traveled the country to charging previous Democratic administrations and current Democratic members of Congress with being soft on communism. His targets included some of the most respected members of the Senate. Herb Block's 1954 depiction of the emerging campaigner would stick with Nixon throughout his career.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"Stand fast, men -- They're armed with marshmallows" - JPG
Even with Senator Joseph McCarthy on the wane, the general hysteria continued in many forms by assorted super patriots. In the summer of 1954, a branch of the American Legion denounced the Girl Scouts, calling the "one world" ideas advocated in their publications "un-American."
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"I have here in my hand . . ." - JPG
In 1954, Senator Joseph McCarthy went too far when he took on the United States Army, accusing it of promoting communists. The Senate held special hearings, known as the Army-McCarthy hearings, which were among the first to be televised nationally. In the course of testimony McCarthy submitted evidence that was identified as fraudulent. As both public and politicians watched the bullying antics of the Senator, they became increasingly disenchanted. Before the year was out McCarthy, whose charges had first hit the headlines in February 1950, was censured by his colleagues for "conduct unbecoming a senator."
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"Have a care, sir" - JPG
Throughout his political career, Dwight Eisenhower refused to take a public stand against Senator Joseph McCarthy's aggressive anti-communist campaign. Eisenhower even struck from a 1952 campaign speech in Wisconsin a defense of his mentor, George C. Marshall, a McCarthy target. Half a dozen Republican senators, including Ralph Flanders, joined Margaret Chase Smith in a "declaration of conscience" against McCarthy. Eisenhower, however, continued to speak of "justice and fair play" in fighting communism, and it was a long time before they prevailed.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"Here He Comes Now” - JPG
During his 1954 “anti-communist campaign,” Vice President Richard Nixon insinuated that a number of Democratic legislators were soft on communism. As Herblock recalled, “it occurred to me that he was figuratively criss-crossing the country by sewer.” He thus memorably condemns Nixon’s smear tactics by showing him emerging from the depths with a five o’clock shadow. When later asked if he regretted drawing some cartoons, Herblock replied that he might have done some differently but not “the manhole cartoon.”
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
“Carry On, Lads” - JPG
This cartoon indicates the declining influence of Senator Joseph McCarthy during the months after the televised Army-McCarthy hearings, which exposed his aggressive, bullying interrogations of people suspected of anti-communism to a broad audience and helped undermine his public support. In Herblock’s cartoon, McCarthy, having stumbled on the ground, hands his brush of dark, tar-colored McCarthyism to Senator William E. Jenner and Vice President Richard Nixon, who are depicted as like-minded supporters, ready to continue the fight.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
This Program Has Been Discontinued Temporarily While the Committee Tries to Find a Way to Discontinue It Permanently - JPG
Among Senator Joseph McCarthy’s moments in the spotlight during his anti-communist campaign, the nationally televised thirty-six-day hearing in 1954 stands out. This cartoon was published during the hearings. As McCarthy charged U.S. Army and civilian officials with subversion, television exposed his hectoring and brutal interrogation techniques, which helped turn public opinion against him. Mortified by his increasingly reckless attacks on officials that included President Dwight D. Eisenhower and political leaders of both parties, on December 2, 1954, the Senate voted to censure McCarthy.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
“What’s This About Your Letting the Common People Come in Here and Read Books?” - JPG
Relations between Luther Evans, Librarian of Congress (1945–1953), and Congress became strained because of the Library’s increasing emphasis on national service. In 1954 President Dwight Eisenhower nominated Lewis Quincy Mumford, who served until 1974, as Evans’s successor. At the Library’s 1954 budget hearing, Mumford was told, “The Librarian should be mindful that the Library is the instrument and creature of Congress.” Although Mumford promised to strengthen the Library’s service to Congress, he refused to decrease its resources to the nation.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
Solution to Nothing - JPG
This cartoon was published the day after Puerto Rican nationalists opened fire in the U.S. House of Representatives, wounding five lawmakers. Herblock’s stark image of the elegantly drawn gun, ghostly skull of death, and terse title powerfully reinforced an editorial that appeared on the same newspaper page as the published cartoon, which decried the acts of senseless violence. Unusually haunting, this cartoon is one of many on the theme that Herblock, a longtime proponent of gun control, produced during his career.
1954 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS

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