HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS + 1952   3

Nothing Exceeds Like Excess - JPG
Senator Joseph McCarthy's irresponsible tactics were endorsed by many voters who felt that the communist threat was such that the means justified the ends. A non-combat veteran, he had used the nickname "Tail-gunner Joe" to win a Senate seat after the war. He then latched on to anti-communism as a winning tactic for re-election. Other politicians, recognizing pay dirt when they saw it, jumped on his tar-barrel bandwagon. The attacks on the Truman Administration continued even as President Harry Truman was fighting a war against communist aggression in Korea. At the State Department's request, Herb Block contributed a booklet of his anticommunist cartoons for distribution abroad. McCarthy used this to charge that he was in the pay of the administration. When confronted by a reporter, McCarthy backed down.
1952 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
“Naughty, Naughty” - JPG
As Dwight Eisenhower ran against Adlai Stevenson for president in 1952, Herblock took him to task for not standing up to the smear campaign of Joseph McCarthy and Richard Nixon. On October 27, 1952, McCarthy denounced Stevenson on the radio, accusing him of aiding the communist cause. McCarthy, who had positioned himself as a national politician with an opinion worthy of interest, discredited Stevenson days before the presidential election on Tuesday, November 4.
1952 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
Death of a Salesman - JPG
Dwight Eisenhower ran for president on a vow to clean up political corruption. On September 18, 1952, with the election just weeks away, the New York Post revealed that his vice-presidential candidate Richard Nixon had received secret funding from California businessmen. Herb Block depicted Nixon cast aside, like the lead character Willie Loman in Arthur Miller's 1949 play of the same title. Nixon has packed up his bags, his corruption-sweeping brooms, and a $16,000 secret fund contribution. Nixon saved his political career and the Republican hold on the election with his now-famous “Checkers” speech, in which he defended his honor in a televised broadcast.
1952 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS

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