HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS + 1946   4

"Gee- It seems like such a dream!" - JPG
This cartoon is the first of numerous instances in his lengthy career in which Herblock addressed the quest for "Home Rule," or self-government, by residents of Washington, D.C., an issue which began with its creation before 1800 and continues to this day. Herblock took up the problem with a vengeance just weeks after he moved to the area in January,1946, to begin his new job at the Washington Post. The cartoon specifically refers to the recommendation by a Congressional committee that the House "provide for a referendum on adoption of self-government by city charter." The referendum never took place but finally, in 1973, a Congressional home rule bill passed, providing for the election of a mayor and granting the right to a non-voting delegate in the House of Representatives.
1946 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
New Broom - JPG
Herblock likened the actions of the House Un-American Activities Committee to a witch hunt, voicing skepticism about those who “set themselves up to decide what was un-American.” Texas Democrat Martin Dies led the group’s probes into alleged communist activities until resigning his seat in 1945. New Jersey Senator J. Parnell Thomas then spearheaded the committee’s investigations of celebrities and artists. Critics charged that the group’s work, which damaged reputations, also violated First Amendment rights.
1946 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"What Happened to the One We Used to Have?" - JPG
Newspaper articles describing the plight of European war refugees, legal impediments to their admission to the U.S., and statements urging President Truman to liberalize immigration regulations preceded Herblock’s cartoon by days. In this cartoon, Herblock questions reduction of immigration quotas during the Depression and World War II. He depicts Lady Liberty, representing U.S. immigration policy, as a figure halting immigrants, not as the traditional beacon of hope to new arrivals. Reduction of immigration quotas during the Depression and World War II highlight changes in policy that Herblock clearly questions.
1946 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS
"He's taking an awful beating, folks" - JPG
Herb Block believed that voters were the real losers in the 1946 off-year election in which Republicans accused Democrats of being Communists and the Democrats equated their Republican counterparts with Hitler. Voter discontent with rising food prices and shortages of such staples as meat and sugar, as well as the growing fear of the spread of communism from Europe, led to a Republican majority in both the House and the Senate. The newly elected congressmen included Richard Nixon, John F. Kennedy, and Joseph McCarthy, each of whom had a profound impact on American politics in the postwar era.
1946 
september 2010 by HERBLOCK_POLITICAL_CARTOONS

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