HARRY_POTTER + artifact   49

Artwork of Mary GrandPré 02 - Artifacts
Mary GrandPré (born 1954 in South Dakota) is an American illustrator and writer, best known for her cover and chapter illustrations for the American editions of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. As of 2007, her artwork, which GrandPré creates with paint and pastels, has illustrated more than twenty books, as well in gallery exhibitions and periodicals such as The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly and The Wall Street Journal.
ARTIFACT 
march 2012 by HARRY_POTTER
Artwork of Mary GrandPré 01 - Artifacts
Mary GrandPré (born 1954 in South Dakota) is an American illustrator and writer, best known for her cover and chapter illustrations for the American editions of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. As of 2007, her artwork, which GrandPré creates with paint and pastels, has illustrated more than twenty books, as well in gallery exhibitions and periodicals such as The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly and The Wall Street Journal.
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march 2012 by HARRY_POTTER
Sir George Ripley's, A Treatise of Mercury and the Philosopher's Stone - JPG
While Harry Potter is fictional, many alchemists spent their lives trying to create the Philosopher's Stone. Sir George Ripley's, A Treatise of Mercury and the Philosopher's Stone, documents one such quest. Ripley, a 15th century Englishman, wrote many well known texts on the Philosopher's Stone. Sir George's enormous wealth convinced many in his time that he had, in fact, discovered the stone.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration from Robert Fludd, Utriusque cosmi... historia - JPG
Even within the body of humans the same patterns were seen. The head* was the sun-king-lion-eagle-gold of the little world of the human, the godlike part which was the seat of reason. Thus, in the microcosm of the body was figured the macrocosm of the kingdom, and of the universe itself.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Male Mandrake Root from Hortus Sanitatis, 1491 - JPG
Mandrake is the common name for the plant genus Mandragora. All parts of the mandrake are poisonous, though its roots have been used in magic rituals. Mandrake roots appear to have arms and legs and resemble the human body. In fact, in many botanical texts, the mandrake root is drawn in the form of a human. Legend also says that when a mandrake root is pulled from the ground, it releases a scream fatal to any listener.

In Harry Potter, the mandrake is re-imagined when ear-muffed Harry and his classmates must re-pot young mandrakes—living, crying, and biting babies—in their Herbology class.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim, De Occulta Philosophia, 1533 - JPG
Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim, a noted 16th-century occultist, alchemist, lawyer, physician, and, in Harry Potter, a wizard trading card, wrote one of the most famous works on magic, De Occulta Philosophia. Agrippa often criticized the politics, culture, and religion of his time and felt that the ancient magic included in his writings could benefit humanity. The scholar hoped that De Occulta Philosophia would show that ancient magic could be manipulated like a practical science, though he cautioned that any use should be sacred. Agrippa believed that only those with respect for nature could successfully control it and that those who used magic for selfish or immoral reasons would risk their very souls.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Portrait of Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim - JPG
“Magic comprises the most profound contemplation of the most secret things, their nature, power, quality, substance, and virtues, as well as the knowledge of their whole nature.” Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim, De Occulta Philosophia, 1533
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of an Alchemy Workshop from Johann Mylius, Opus Medico-Chymicum, 1618 - JPG
Like Harry, many Renaissance alchemists, naturalists, and physicians struggled with the responsibilities that came with their attempts to understand the world.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Paracelsus, Aurei Velleris oder der Guldin Schatz und Kunstkammer, 1598 - JPG
“All things that we use on earth let us use them for good and not for evil.” Paracelsus, De Religione Perpetua, 1533
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Portrait of Paracelsus - JPG
Paracelsus, who appears as a sculpture in Harry Potter, was a 16th-century physician and alchemist notorious for criticizing the medical practices of his time. For example, he argued that bloodletting, a popular medical cure-all, would do more harm than good to the patient.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of Merpeople from The Workes of Ambrose Parey, translated out of Latine, 1634 - JPG
“Apparently she loathes part-humans; she campaigned to have merpeople rounded up and tagged last year...” Sirius Black to Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
illustration of the Human body and the Astrological Signs that Govern It from Joannes de Ketham, Fasciculo de Medicina, 1493/1494 - JPG
“We wizards have mistreated and abused our fellows for too long, and we are now reaping our reward.” Albus Dumbledore to Harry Potter, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
From Workes of Ambrose Parey, translated out of Latine, 1634 - JPG
“… Sirens, Nereides, or mere-maides, who (according to Pliny) have the faces of women, and scaley bodies, yea where as they have the shape of man; neither yet can the forementioned wed confusion and conjuction of seeds take any place here, for, as we lately said, they consist of their owne proper nature.” The Workes of Ambrose Parey, translated out of Latine, 1634
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Portrait of Ambroise Paré - JPG
Although not wholly convinced the animal existed, Ambroise Paré included unicorns in his writings because of the numerous accounts of sightings and the creature’s purported medicinal uses. Unicorn horn, such as that of the bihorn species Paré described, was commonly believed to neutralize poisons and many apothecaries claimed to stock it.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Bihorn Species of Unicorns from Ambroise Paré, Les Oeuures d’Ambroise Paré, 1585 - JPG
“Stories about the medicinal values of a unicorn’s horn, especially that it is an antidote to poisons, may have originated from similar Asian beliefs about the rhinoceros horn.” Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of an Apothecary Mixing Theriac from Hortus Sanitatis, 1491 - JPG
“Theriac even promises to make old age more peaceful, life longer, and one’s health more stable …” Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551
Illustration of an apothecary mixing theriac
Hortus Sanitatis, 1491
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Portrait of Konrad Gesner - JPG
Like many of his contemporaries, the naturalist believed that basilisks and dragons existed and he catalogued their medicinal uses alongside those of their reptile cousin, the snake. For example, Gesner wrote about dragon fat’s success against creeping ulcers and viper flesh’s effectiveness in theriac, a poison antidote and cure-all commonly used until the late 19th century.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Portrait of Nicholas Flamel - JPG
One of history’s most famous alchemists, Nicolas Flamel, is featured fictionally in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone as the creator of the magical Stone.
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Unicorn from Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551 - JPG
“The blood of a unicorn will keep you alive, even if you are an inch from death, but at a terrible price. You have slain something pure and defenseless to save yourself, and you will have but a half-life, a cursed life, from the moment the blood touches your lips.” Firenze the centaur to Harry Potter,
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Botany Discussion from Hortus Sanitatis, 1491 - JPG
“Three times a week they went out to the greenhouses behind the castle to study Herbology…where they learned how to take care of all the strange plants and fungi, and found out what they were used for.” Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J.K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of Distillation Equipment from Ambroise Paré, Les Oeuures d'Ambroise Paré, 1585 - JPG
“There was a lot more to magic, as Harry quickly found out, than waving your wand and saying a few funny words.” Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Female Mandrake Root from Hortus Sanitatis, 1491 - JPG
“Instead of roots, a small, muddy, and extremely ugly baby popped out of the earth. The leaves were growing right out of his head. He had pale green, mottled skin, and was clearly bawling at the top of his lungs.” Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Basilisk from Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551 - JPG 02
“I heard that on the edge of Germany near Styria, many flying four-legged serpents resembling lizards appeared, winged, with an incurable bite…” Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER
Illustration of a Basilisk from Konrad Gesner, Historiae Animalium, 1551 - JPG 01
“Of the many fearsome beasts and monsters that roam our land, there is none more curious or more deadly than the Basilisk, known also as the King of Serpents.” Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry library book,
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J. K. Rowling
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april 2010 by HARRY_POTTER

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