Secrets of the Parthenon - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
For 25 centuries the Parthenon has been shot at, set on fire, rocked by earthquakes, looted for its sculptures, almost destroyed by explosion, and disfigured by well-meaning renovations. It has gone from temple, to church, to mosque, to munitions dump. What could be next? How about a scientific search for the secrets of its incomparable beauty and astonishingly rapid construction?
LIBRARY-OF-RESOURCES 
june 2013
Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief at the Met - Audio
A talk by Rick Riordan, author of the award-winning children's book series Percy Jackson and the Olympians. An engaging speaker and teacher, Riordan talks about inspiration, writing, and mostly about the Olympians, many of whom are on view at the Met!

Rick Riordan, author, New York Times bestseller, The Lightning Thief, of the award-winning series Percy Jackson and the Olympians; introduced by Sean Hemingway, Associate Curator in the Department of Greek and Roman Art.
AUDIO 
may 2012
Sallet in the Shape of a Lion's Head - Video
This helmet is the earliest surviving example of Renaissance armor all'antica (in the antique style). The helmet represents the head of the Nemean Lion, whose pelt was worn as a headdress and cloak by the mythological hero Hercules. Hercules was frequently portrayed in Renaissance art as a symbol of indomitable strength, courage, and perseverance. The gilt-copper lion's head is mounted over a plain steel sallet made specifically for this purpose. The helmet retains its original padded canvas lining.
VIDEO 
may 2012
Connections: Olympians - Slideshow
Associate publisher Gwen Roginsky and her teenage daughter Ana Sofia Meneses relish the drama of the dysfunctional family that is the Olympians.
SLIDESHOW 
april 2012
Rick Riordan: 2009 National Book Festival - Video
Speaker Biography: Rick Riordan is the author of the New York Times best-selling "Percy Jackson and the Olympians" series for children and the multiaward-winning "Tres Navarre" mystery series for adults. For 15 years, Riordan taught English and history at public and private middle schools in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Texas. In 2002, Saint Mary's Hall honored him with the school's first Master Teacher Award. His adult fiction has won the top three national awards in the mystery genre - the Edgar, the Anthony and the Shamus. His short fiction has appeared in Mary Higgins Clark Mystery Magazine and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. Riordan lives in Texas.
VIDEO 
june 2011
Errand in the Maze: Gian Carlo Menotti: Choreographed by Martha Graham - Video
Errand into the Maze takes as its inspiration the myth of Ariadne and the Minotaur. Martha Graham took this Greek myth as her symbol of the conquering of fear. There is an errand into the maze of the heart's darkness in order to face and do battle with the Creature of Fear. There is the accomplishment of the errand, the instant of triumph, and the emergence from the dark.
VIDEO 
june 2011
Andromeda: Beauty and the Beast - Video
In Greek Mythology the Princess Andromeda was sacrificed to appease a sea monsters appetite, but astronomers are learning that the Andromeda Galaxy is less the spiral beauty and more the voracious beast.
VIDEO 
may 2011
Flight of Icarus: Pavlos Valassakis - Page Turner
Icarus and his father Daedalus escaped from prison and flew away from Crete. But Icarus did not listen to his father, and flew too close to the sun.
PAGE-TURNER 
march 2011
Martha Graham Dance Company: Errand in the Maze - Video
An excerpt from “Errand Into The Maze”, a dance based on a Greek myth, exemplifies how simple movement is amplified to create choreography.
VIDEO 
february 2011
Odyssey: Homer - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
Odysseus must travel the known and unknown world before he can return home to his beloved island kingdom of Ithaca. What does this ancient story say to readers today? In this program, Odysseus's story is given ancient and modern historical and philosophical context, and illustrated with centuries of art. Featured are theater director Mary Zimmerman, actor-director Tim Blake-Nelson, and psychologist/author Jonathan Shay.
LIBRARY-OF-RESOURCES 
february 2011
Unearthing Ancient Greece - PDF 05
Ancient Greek Artifact Analytical Essay
PDF 
january 2011
Elements of Myths - PDF 03
Myth Performance Planning Worksheet
PDF 
january 2011
Literary Visions: Distant Voices: Myth, Symbolism, and Allusion in Poetry - Video
Four poetic versions of the Icarus myth — those of Sexton, Spender, Williams, and Field — are dramatized and compared. Marge Piercy discusses the role of myth in her poetry.
VIDEO 
october 2010
Literary Visions: The Vision Quest: Myth and Symbolism in Drama - Video
Alaskan playwright David Hunsaker's dramatizations of Eskimo myth and his productions of Eskimo translations of Greek tragedies, together with scenes from Oedipus Rex, demonstrate the enduring power and meaning of myth in drama.
VIDEO 
october 2010
Literary Visions: Patterns of Action: Plot and Conflict in Drama - Video
A dramatization of Oedipus Rex demonstrates the classical plot structure. Dramatist A. R. Gurney discusses conflict and plot in contemporary American theater.
VIDEO 
october 2010
Winged Victory - JPG
To express anger over civilian deaths, Herblock refers to the ancient Greek statue Winged Victory of Samothrace (ca.190 BC). On the eve of World War II, it was clear that the airplane had changed the nature of war. Armies, no longer dependent on ground forces, had the potential to eliminate hundreds of thousands of civilians from above in the name of combat. On June 3, 1938, in Washington, Sumner Welles, Acting Secretary of State, denounced aerial atrocities in Spain and China that killed many civilians.
JPG 
september 2010
Ulysses and the Syrens: John Doyle, draughtsman, painter, lithographer, and caricaturist, 1797-1868 - JPG
This is a cartoon representing British political figures in 1840. The title, Ulysses and the Syrens, refers to a passage from Homer's epic poem, the Odyssey, Book XII, lines 153-200, in which Odysseus (Ulysses) had been told by the goddess, Circe, that he alone should listen to the song of the Sirens. The beauty of the music of the Sirens enraptured sailors, causing them to linger and be destroyed and, in order to save himself and his men, Circe explained that he should have himself tied to the mast. Odysseus stopped the ears of his men with wax and ordered them to tie him to the mast, forbidding them to untie him until they had passed the island of the Sirens. His men obeyed his wishes and rowed past the island, and Odysseus alone listened to the beautiful music of the Sirens.Many of the political figures are identified in pencil on this lithograph, but the true meaning behind the satire needs further research.
JPG 
september 2010
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