TV Anchor Uses Hurtful Email as Opportunity for Civility - Video
Upon being told she is obese by a viewer, Jennifer Livingston uses his comments as a discussion starter about bullying and the need to be kinder to one another.
VIDEO 
december 2012
Bullies and The Bullied: The World of Othello - Website
In this lesson, students will approach Shakespeare’s Othello through the lens of bullying -- a modern-day adolescent problem of which students may have first-hand experience. By drawing on their own understanding of bullying and on definitions and descriptions of bullying widely available, students will have a powerful entry point into one of Shakespeare’s most psychologically complex plays.

This lesson will likely provide ample opportunities to engage students in timely discussions of pressures they might be facing in their own experiences, and the hope is that beginning with a focus on a highly charged issue like bullying, this will allow students a way to start “doing” things with Shakespeare’s language instead of getting caught in the idea that they can’t understand it. An engaging issue can help students to bypass this block.

Students will participate in a pre-reading discussion of bullying in order to establish definitions from which they will draw in discussions of the play as it is studied.

At the conclusion of their reading, students will stage select scenes from the play in order to understand and assess whether characters in Othello are perpetrators and/or victims of bullying as our culture understands the term today. Final staging of scenes will follow the festival model proposed by Folger Education as a way of creating a capstone project for your study of the play.

This lesson is designed to frame an entire approach to Othello and will take approximately two to three 50-minute classes prior to reading the play and approximately one to two weeks following the conclusion of reading. The staging of scenes may be tailored to the class’s interests, time, and student size; however, teachers should adapt any part of this as they see fit.
WEBSITE 
december 2012
Exclusive Interview with Lee Hirsch about "Bully" and Special Needs - Video
Children with learning disabilities are at particular risk for being bullied. View clips from the documentary "Bully," and hear what director Lee Hirsch has to say about how kids with special needs are susceptible to bullying and what he hopes the film accomplishes.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Notifying the School About a Bullying Incident: Using a Template Letter - PDF
Parents should contact school staff each time their child informs them that he or she has been bullied. PACER Center has created template letters that parents may use as a guide for writing a letter to their child’s school. These letters contain standard language and “fill in the blank” spaces so the letter can be customized for your child’s situation.
PDF 
april 2012
Common Views and Myths about Bullying - PDF
In spite of the significant impact that bullying can have on a target, it often continues to be viewed as acceptable behavior. There are many misperceptions that adults may have about bullying, all of which can lead to minimizing the behavior. Learn more about responses such as “boys will be boys” or “it’s only teasing”.
PDF 
april 2012
Record Keeping and Bullying - PDF
When a child is a target of bullying, parents need to document the events and develop a record (or history) of what is happening to their child. This record is useful when talking with school educators, law enforcement personnel, or other individuals who may need to assist parents in intervening against bullying. Data is important. Remember – if it is not in writing, it does not exist.
PDF 
april 2012
Steps To Take If Your Child Is Being Bullied At School - PDF
A guide containing three steps to take when your child is being bullied at school; work with your child, work with the school and work with district administration.
PDF 
april 2012
Help Your Child Recognize the Signs of Bullying - PDF
Parents can prepare themselves to talk with their children by considering how they are going to handle their child’s questions and emotions. They can also decide what information they would like to give their child about bullying
PDF 
april 2012
What if Your Child IS the Bully? - PDF
The word “bullying” often conjures up an image of a schoolyard scene, with a big, intimidating student towering over a small, cowering child. That’s just one face of bullying—and of children who bully. Another face of a bully might be…that of your child. Surprised? Many parents are. Often they have no idea that their child is harassing other children. Yet knowing the facts—and acting to change the situation—is vitally important in making the future safer for your child and all children.
PDF 
april 2012
Notifying School Administrators of Harassment Concerns - PDF
Ten steps for a parent to take in reporting bullying to the school.
PDF 
april 2012
Is Your Child Being Bullied In Cyberspace? - PDF
If the word “bullying” makes you think of one child picking on another in the schoolyard, it is time to update your image of how students bully. While the face-to-face harassment certainly still exists, new ways of bullying have emerged that can be particularly harmful to children. With the easy access to cell phones, instant messaging, mobile devices, social networking websites, and other technologies, bullying has found its way into cyberspace.
PDF 
april 2012
Drama: Is It Happening to You? - PDF
Drama. Bullying. Teasing. Harassment. No matter what you call it, it hurts. If you’re pushed, hit, or your things are ripped off or trashed, it can hurt physically. If you’re ignored by friends or cruel things are posted about you online, it can hurt emotionally. If it happens to you, you’ve probably asked yourself, “Why me?” You know how painful it is to be treated this way. So seriously, what can you do? A lot! Learn how.
PDF 
april 2012
How You Can Help Your Child Learn to Be a Good Self Advocate - PDF
It is never too early to start teaching your child how he or she can advocate for himself or herself. Like many other important life skills, self-advocacy is a critical tool your child needs in order to achieve goals, increase self-sufficiency, and become a successful young adult. It is a lifelong process that begins with your child learning by watching you, as a parent, be a good advocate.
PDF 
april 2012
Quick FAQs - Interactive
Learn more about the roles of bullying, and think about where you fit in the cycle of bullying.
INTERACTIVE 
april 2012
LD Expert Explains How to Prevent Bullying - Video
Learning disabilities expert Dr. Sheldon Horowitz talks about the problem of bullying and provides three crucial tips for parents who have a child with a learning disability.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Bullying and Disability Harassment in the Workplace: What Youth Should Know - PDF
This InfoBrief was developed by PACER Center in partnership with the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth. The InfoBrief is designed to help youth, including youth with disabilities, recognize signs of bullying in the workplace. It offers examples of bullying situations at work and strategies to help address the issue. Much is understood about the negative consequences of bullying at school, but youth should also be made aware that bullying does not always end at school and is often encountered at work.
PDF 
april 2012
Use Positive Strategies to Protect Your Child with Disabilities from Bullying - PDF
While any child can be a target of bullying, children with disabilities can be especially vulnerable. Although few studies exist concerning children with disabilities and bullying in the United States, the studies available indicate an increased risk for children with special needs. Parents can help protect their children with disabilities from bullying and its devastating effects if they promote effective strategies such as PACER’s Peer Advocacy Program, use the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as a tool, work with the school, and know their child’s rights under the law.
PDF 
april 2012
Tips for Teens: Use Your IEP Meetings to Learn How to Advocate for Yourself - PDF
Self-advocacy is a key step in becoming an adult. It means looking out for yourself, telling people what you need, and knowing how to take responsibility. No one is born knowing these skills. Everyone has to learn them. Ready to begin learning? Here is some great information from teens, for teens, that can start you on your way.
PDF 
april 2012
Telling Classmates About Your Child’s Disability May Foster Acceptance - PDF
One of the best ways to teach children about a disability is to talk to them at school. For many families, presenting at school is an annual event. Sometimes, an IEP team writes it into a child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) document.
PDF 
april 2012
Individualized Education Program (IEP) and Bullying - PDF
Students with disabilities who are eligible for special education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) will have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP can be a helpful tool in a bullying prevention plan.
PDF 
april 2012
Bullying and Harassment of Students with Disabilities - PDF
This handout provides an overview of important facts for parents, educators and students to know about students with disabilities and bullying.
PDF 
april 2012
We Need to Talk - Video
Teens have their turn talking about what is helpful and what they want parents to know.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Inside Story - Interactive
An interactive look, from a teen perspective, at some of the reasons students don’t talk about bullying. Meet Pete. He is a dude with a lot going on inside, and he has zeroed in on some of the reasons that students don’t tell an adult about bullying
INTERACTIVE 
april 2012
Advice Gone Wrong - Interactive
An interactive teen perspective (written by teens for adults) on unhelpful advice from parents and educators.
INTERACTIVE 
april 2012
Student Action Plan Against Bullying! - PDF
Are you an educator working with a student being bullied, a parent looking for ways to help your child change their behavior, or a student who wants to take action against bullying but you aren’t sure what to do? As a student, bullying is something that impacts you, your peers, and your school – whether you’re the target of bullying, a witness, or the person who bullies. Bullying can end, but that won’t happen unless students, parents, and educators work together and take action.

The first step is to create a plan that works for you and your situation. This student action plan is an opportunity for you – either on your own or with parents and teachers – to develop a strategy to change what’s happening to you or someone else. It’s your chance to make a difference
PDF 
april 2012
Thabiti Brown on Building a Positive School Climate - Video
Thabiti Brown is the principal at Codman Academy, a charter public school in Dorchester, Massachusetts.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Richard Weissbourd on What Schools Can Do - Video
Richard Weissbourd is a lecturer in education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His work focuses on vulnerability and resilience in childhood, the achievement gap, moral development, and effective schools and services for children.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Anna Nolin on Being Proactive - Video
Anna Nolin is the principal at Wilson Middle School in Natick, Massachusetts. She is also an adjunct professor at Framingham State College.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Adult Intervention - Video
One of the most challenging questions for any adult is how to effectively address a bullying situation. Watch this clip from the film to see how one administrator tried to address a bullying incident after the fact.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Alex - Video
Alex is a 14-year-old from Sioux City, Iowa. He has endured ongoing bullying at school for years.
VIDEO 
april 2012
David Long - Video
David Long’s son Tyler committed suicide after years of relentless bullying. In this video, David describes some of the abuse Tyler endured.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Kelby - Video
After Kelby came out as gay, she suffered both physical attacks and more subtle ostracism. Before the new school year starts, she says, "I just keep thinking that maybe I’m the one that is in this town that can make a change. I don’t want them to win, and I don’t want to back down, and maybe all it takes is for one person to stand up. You’re not just standing up for you. You’re standing up for all the kids who go through this, every single day.” The following clip was filmed several months later.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Trey - Video
Trey’s best friend, Ty Smalley, took his own life at age 11. In this video, Trey reflects on the time they spent together and remembers his friend.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Q & A with Director Lee Hirsch - Website
Filming BULLY involved more than a year of following stories and shooting footage in several schools and communities around the United States. Much of what director Lee Hirsch captured on film did not make it into the final version. As with many documentaries, making BULLY involved difficult choices about what to include and what to leave out. In a conversation with Facing History and Ourselves, Hirsch reflected on the stories he documented and how he decided what to include in the film. The interview was conducted by Daniel Sigward, curriculum writer and researcher at Facing History and Ourselves.
WEBSITE 
april 2012
Yes...That's Bullying - Video
Henry's feelings are hurt when his classmates leave him out, ruin his artwork and call him names. Thanks to Selena, who quietly alerts the teacher, the bullying behavior is stopped. The classroom is reminded that everyone deserves respect.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Playground Is for Everyone - Video
Ty and Jojo are told by Lance to keep off the climbing bars. Zack, who recently watched a classmate take a stand against bullying, reminds everyone that it’s important to share. Mr. Ortiz takes notice, and reinforces the message that bullying is not OK.
VIDEO 
april 2012
House I Live In: Frank Sinatra (1945) - Video
On September 11, 1945, Frank Sinatra took a bold stand for human rights using a film and a song to promote respect for others as an ideal of American freedom and civic pride. The song, "The House I Live In,” was composed by Abel Meeropol, a NYC school teacher. In Sinatra’s hands the song and the ten minute Hollywood film short he taped became a national appeal to a post World War II weary America to unite and remember the freedoms the nation had fought for overseas and throughout history, even as African Americans launched a “Double V Campaign” to obtain equality at home.

The song was covered by Paul Robeson, Mahalia Jackson and Josh White. The film short earned Sinatra an Honorary Academy Award and a special Golden Globe award in 1946. In 2007, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being 'culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.
VIDEO 
april 2012
Guide to the Film BULLY: Fostering Empathy and Action in Schools - PDF
The film BULLY follows five stories of children and families who are affected deeply by bullying within the course of a school year. With intimate glimpses into homes, classrooms, cafeterias, and principals’ offices, the film offers insight into the lives of bullied, ridiculed children. Historically, seemingly small instances of labeling and ridicule have catastrophic consequences for the marginalized groups involved. This film brings those “small” instances into the spotlight creating a space to discuss the effects of bullyng. The accompanying guide tells the personal stories of those bullied, and suggests that improving school climate takes fostering a reflective and engaging learning community.
PDF 
march 2012
It Gets Better - Video
Secretary Sebelius's message to LGBT youth suffering from bullying and intolerance.
VIDEO 
january 2012
Youth Violence - PDF
This report is the first comprehensive review of violence on a global scale. Chapter 2 provides detailed information on youth violence.
PDF 
january 2012
Walk Away - Video
Thanks to DCavalier for the bookmark: Bullying is a terrible thing to experience and we hope this song will offer some help. "Walking Away" is one of the several recommended strategies in dealing with bullying, and we tried to bring that concept to life with this song.
VIDEO 
august 2011
Bullying of Malvolio - Website
This lesson explores Malvolio's behavior and treatment by having students first reflect on their own experiences with bullying. Teachers are reminded to stress that bullying is unacceptable behavior.By Act 5, observations of Malvolio will have included some annoying personality traits, his mistreatment by others, leading from practical joke to his temporary incarceration.As a pre-reading activity, students will discuss their own observations of bullying either as insiders or outsiders. After having read the play, students will cut one of the key scenes in the play, highlighting one or more of the "bullying trends".Finally, using the website, www.pixton.com students will create an electronic comic strip depicting two possible interpretations of one scene that involves Malvolio: one where he is a focus of harmless comedy, one where he is a victim of spiteful mistreatment.What does Twelfth Night teach us about bullying, punishment, and/or forgiveness?
WEBSITE 
april 2011
Ostracism Case Study - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
Facing History and Ourselves has developed a face-to-face workshop on ostracism and bullying that uses the ostracism case study as its core content. In the workshop, participants read and respond to the voices of eighth grade students and one of their teachers as they talk about a social conflict among a group of friends that escalated into the ostracism of one of them. Their voices bring us inside their world and provoke questions about issues of inclusion and exclusion in adolescence and beyond. What is the role of young people and adults in preventing and responding to these kinds of incidents? What are the connections between these kinds of social issues facing students and the choices that teachers make in their classrooms and schools?
LIBRARY-OF-RESOURCES 
march 2011
Moving Toward Acceptance Through Picture Books and Two-Voice Texts - Website
Connecting literature to students’ lived experiences in the school and classroom, this lesson provides an opportunity for students to learn about situations of intolerance and discuss ways to move to a more ideal world in which acceptance is the norm. Starting with the picture book Whoever You Are, students discuss embracing diversity. The class then compares the ideal to realistic situations that they face in their own school as well as those portrayed in the books Weslandia and Insects Are My Life. Students then study, create, and perform two-voice texts that shows how they can move closer to the ideal of accepting all types of diversity. 
WEBSITE 
march 2011
High-Interest Novel Helps Struggling Readers Confront Bullying in Schools - Website
In many of today’s schools, bullying and violence are prevalent. After completing this lesson, students will have a more in-depth understanding of these problems. Using a realistic, high-interest novel (The Bully by Paul Langan) and interactive reading strategies, students discuss many issues that surround bullying and consider what they themselves can do to prevent bullying. In a multisession lesson, students read The Bully in stages, discuss the story events and issues related to bullying, and complete graphic organizers to help them organize story information. As students read, they write reflective journals and perform Readers Theatre in groups. Students are continuously asked to put themselves in the characters' shoes and explain how they would respond and react in similar situations.
WEBSITE 
march 2011
What You Need to Know to Stop Bullying Now! in Your School and Community - Webinar
This Webcast includes Bullying 101 – the statistics and research you need to communicate effectively about the importance of bullying prevention. It also features an overview of how to use HRSA's Stop Bullying Now! Campaign Resources and how states, schools and students have utilized and adapted the Campaign.
WEBINAR 
march 2011
Search for Civility - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
Given the increasing volatility of political discourse in the United States, from vitriolic editorializing presented as news to recent Tea Party protests, there is a need for students to learn how to disagree while remaining civil.Not only should students learn how to engage in civil debate, but they should also learn the value of listening to points of view and opinions that differ from their own. Being open to different kinds of people and ideas help students maintain open minds and to get along in a diverse society.
LIBRARY-OF-RESOURCES 
march 2011
Not in Our Schools - LIBRARY OF RESOURCES
Not In Our Town is a documentary series and campaign that combines public television broadcasts with grassroots events, educational outreach and online activities to help communities battling hate talk to and learn from each other.

The Not In Our Town project was launched in 1995 with a national PBS special that told the story of how citizens of Billings, Montana joined forces to respond to hate crimes in their town. Their story helped create a new “model” for community response to bigotry and intolerance. Not In Our Town and its follow-up programs have been used in hundreds of communities during times of crisis.
LIBRARY-OF-RESOURCES 
march 2011
President Obama and the First Lady: Conference on Bullying Prevention - Video
The President and First Lady Michelle Obama discuss how we can all work together to end bullying as an accepted practice and create a safer environment for our kids to grow up in. March 10, 2011.
VIDEO 
march 2011
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