AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM + artwork   268

Raspberry Suite (necklace): Gallen Benson (2000) - JPG
Gallen Benson often creates "suites" of jewelry composed of a necklace and earrings. Although this suite has an antique, Victorian quality, the raspberry subject matter adds a whimsical twist.
ARTWORK 
may 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Yellow Calla: Georgia O'Keeffe (1926) - JPG
The waxy, long-stemmed calla lily captivated Georgia O'Keeffe in the 1920s. The calla lily was a popular subject in American art in the 1920s and 1930s, when it was fashionable to read sexual and psychological values into the blooms. (Lynes, Georgia O'Keeffe and the Calla Lily in American Art, 1860-1940, 2002). But O'Keeffe objected to this, and insisted that the point of painting any flower so closely and hypnotically was to make people see it for the first time.
ARTWORK 
may 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Rip Van Winkle: Frederick MacMonnies (1876-1880) - JPG
Washington Irving’s short story “Rip Van Winkle” first appeared in The Sketch Book of 1819 and was performed onstage in 1865 by the actor Joseph Jefferson, who played the title role to critical acclaim. In the tale, Rip Van Winkle ventures out into the mountains and runs across some strangers who befriend him and ply him with liquor. He falls asleep and awakens to find that he has slept for twenty years and is an old graybeard. Frederick MacMonnies’ inspiration for the subject may have come from his visit to an art studio as a child, where he saw the sculptor John Rogers making statues of Rip Van Winkle.
ARTWORK 
may 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Scene on the Hudson (Rip Van Winkle): James Hamilton (1845) - JPG
Hamilton's painting combines several scenes from Washington Irving's short story. The hazy river valley beyond the trees evokes the Catskills, where Rip Van Winkle looked out over the Hudson River "moving on its silent but majestic course." Beneath the cavernous rock, several men enjoy a game of ninepins while Rip drinks the brew that will make him sleep for twenty years and awake to a different world. Irving wrote his stories for sophisticated urban Americans, whose fast-moving culture, fed by the nation’s industrialization, was displacing the rural society of the old Dutch Knickerbockers of the Hudson Valley.
ARTWORK 
may 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
View Down Akersgate, Oslo: William H. Johnson (ca. 1935) - JPG
This view shows two imposing churches in the center of Oslo, Norway: the copper-domed Trinity Church and Saint Olav’s Church in the background. Hints of blossoms evoke a change of season, and William H. Johnson painted intense, expressionistic hues in the buildings and streets, perhaps to capture the emotional undercurrents of a gray, late-winter day.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Acrobats: Alexander Calder (1944) - JPG
Alexander Calder became fascinated with the circus when a job with The Police Gazette in New York required him to draw cartoons of local athletic events. He went on to study the movements of acrobats, trapeze artists, knife throwers, belly dancers and a vast array of animals. He began his legendary "Circus" piece in Paris, and expanded it over the years until it filled five suitcases and a two-hour show. The Acrobats was inspired by these early studies and represents a brief period when Calder worked in plaster, creating mobile objects that would be cast in bronze.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Pin: Alexander Calder (n.d.) - JPG
Alexander Calder made numerous pieces of jewelry throughout his career, including an engagement ring for his wife, Louisa. He was one of the first artist-jewelers to experiment with ordinary metals and stones during the 1930s, and would often include copper wire, glass, or leather in his spiraling designs.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Nenuphar: Alexander Calder (1968) - JPG
Nenuphar was built at Calder's workshop in France for the 1968 opening of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. It is one of the artist's stabiles, or fixed sculptures, and the lyrical shapes cut from sheet steel convey the same gentle, graceful movement as his mobiles. Six silhouettes evoke the dark reflections of the water lily's flowering stalk and curling leaves. In fact, Calder conjured the entire intricate world of a windswept pond, varying the tendrils to suggest the shadowy presence of birds and fish among the lilies.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Necklace: Alexander Calder (n.d.) - JPG
As a child, Alexander Calder made his first piece of jewelry for his sister's dolls. He continued to experiment with jewelry throughout his career, even after gaining international recognition for his whimsical mobiles and stabiles. Calder made most of his jewelry for his family and close friends and often gave his pieces as gifts. His wife, Louisa, was the main recipient of his creations. Necklace resembles a piece he made for her in 1940. All of Calder's jewelry was constructed from multiple pieces of hammered brass or iron, and he used the spiral design repeatedly. Calder refused to sell his jewelry commercially, for he wanted each wearer to know that his or her piece was made by the artist's hands alone.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Maquette for Flamingo: Alexander Calder (1972) - JPG
Flamingo was commissioned by the General Services Administration's Art-in-Architecture Program. The subject of this stabile, a flamingo, follows Alexander Calder's lifelong affection for whimsical and exotic creatures. Evoking both an actual bird and a silly yard ornament, Flamingo shows the humor and playfulness common in much of Calder's work. Chicago celebrated the dedication of Flamingo with "Alexander Calder Day in Chicago," a festival that included an old-fashioned parade of marching bands, clowns, unicyclists, and animals. Calder, who sat on top of the famous Schlitz bandwagon, received cheers from the thousands lining the sidewalks. However, not all of Chicago was happy that the government had "wasted" their tax money on "that piece of junk." Some thought it looked like a droopy tulip or a steel mosquito. Flamingo was installed at the plaza of the John C. Kluczynski Federal Building, Chicago, in 1974 and measures 53 by 24 by 60 feet.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
Hair Comb: Alexander Calder (n.d.) - JPG
Alexander Calder made numerous pieces of jewelry throughout his career, including an engagement ring for his wife, Louisa. He was one of the first artist-jewelers to experiment with ordinary metals and stones during the 1930s, and would often include copper wire, glass, or leather in his spiraling designs.
ARTWORK 
april 2012 by AMERICAN_ART_MUSEUM
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