time   65007

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Want to Win the War on Drugs? Portugal Might Have the Answer
In the 1990s,some 5,000 addicts roamed the streets,searching for their daily fix as dirty syringes piled up in the gutters.Back then, Portugal was in the grip of heroin addiction. An estimated 1% of the population—bankers, students, socialites—were hooked on heroin and Portugal had the highest rate of HIV infection in the entire European Union. “Over the course of two decades, the government’s response had been one that Americans will recognize: it introduced increasingly harsh policies led by the criminal justice system.By the late ’90s, about half the people in prison were there for drug-related reasons—creating a large addicted inmate population. Nothing was working. On the other side of the Atlantic, the U.S. was doing the same: spending billions of dollars cracking down on drug users.But in 2001, Portugal took a radical step. It became the first country in the world to decriminalize the consumption of all drugs.Seventeen years on, the U.S. is suffering its worst addiction epidemic in American history. In 2016 alone, an estimated 64,000 Americans died from opioid overdoses—more than the combined death tolls for Americans in the Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq Wars. In Portugal, meanwhile, the drug-induced death rate has plummeted to five times lower than the E.U. average and stands at one-fiftieth of the United States’. Its rate of HIV infection has dropped from 104.2 new cases per million in 2000 to 4.2 cases per million in 2015. Drug use has declined overall among the 15- to 24-year-old population, those most at risk of initiating drug use.Fonseca says, “what America and other countries can learn from Portugal is to treat people with more dignity.” Portugal has showed that, without spending significant sums, governments can give drug users the tools to put their lives back on track.
Time  drugs 
43 minutes ago by thomas.kochi
So Long, And No Thanks for the Externalities: The Rational Rejection of Security Advice by Users
It is often suggested that users are hopelessly lazy and
unmotivated on security questions. They chose weak
passwords, ignore security warnings, and are oblivious
to certificates errors. We argue that users’ rejection
of the security advice they receive is entirely rational
from an economic perspective. The advice offers to
shield them from the direct costs of attacks, but burdens
them with far greater indirect costs in the form of effort.
Looking at various examples of security advice we find
that the advice is complex and growing, but the benefit
is largely speculative or moot. For example, much of the
advice concerning passwords is outdated and does little
to address actual treats, and fully 100% of certificate
error warnings appear to be false positives. Further, if
users spent even a minute a day reading URLs to avoid
phishing, the cost (in terms of user time) would be two
orders of magnitude greater than all phishing losses.
Thus we find that most security advice simply offers a
poor cost-benefit tradeoff to users and is rejected. Security
advice is a daily burden, applied to the whole
population, while an upper bound on the benefit is the
harm suffered by the fraction that become victims annually.
When that fraction is small, designing security
advice that is beneficial is very hard. For example, it
makes little sense to burden all users with a daily task
to spare 0.01% of them a modest annual pain.
security  infosec  usability  paper  filetype:pdf  economics  time  risk 
16 hours ago by jabley
Working with timezones
"I do enjoy thinking about some of the strange things that can happen with time and timezones and it can be amusing, and occasionally useful, to read some lists of counterexamples to reasonable-sounding statements about time, but it’s hard to actually get stuff done with this information alone. All those counterexamples might leave you thinking that dealing with timezones is basically impossible to get right, whereas in fact it’s not that difficult once you draw the right pictures. I thought it’d be useful to share the pictures I find helpful when approaching timezone-related problems."
calendar  programming  time  timezones 
22 hours ago by garrettc
A new old Kinks song
“Time Song,” a previously unreleased Kinks song, no doubt written by Ray Davies.
music  time 
yesterday by M.Leddy

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