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Can meditation really make the world a better place? | Aeon Essays
In The Buddha Pill, Farias and Wikholm write:

[We] haven’t stopped believing in meditation’s ability to fuel change but [we are] concerned that the science of meditation is promoting a skewed view: meditation wasn’t developed so we could lead less stressful lives or improve our wellbeing. Its primary purpose was more radical – to rupture your idea of who you are; to shake to the core your sense of self so that you realise there is ‘nothing there’. But that’s not how we see meditation courses promoted in the West. Here, meditation has been revamped as a natural pill that will quieten your mind and make you happier.
meditation  pill  science  study  testing  brain  ideas  doubt  self  ego 
5 weeks ago by LizFlyntz
The Lost Spirit Within The Artist - Siddha Performance
“Because the greatest things in life are not grabbed by the throat. They are attracted by the spirit.”

“You’re a goddamn poet, I swear. I’m all ears, Kapil.”

...

“Amy D has always been here, brother. You’ve just been looking the other way. You’ve ignored her for years. Give your every triumph to her. Don’t do it as a sacrifice against yourself. Do it as a genuine, sincere, and all consuming gift for her. And as you do, you will begin to feel her presence again.”

He smiled and said, “Damn it, Kapil. Can we ever go through a session without you making me cry? But I’m so grateful to have met you.”

“All human beings come into our lives for a reason, brother. If we listen to the universe and its unerring wisdom, then we reach out and hold on to those it brings our way, no matter what our mind tells us to do. Tears flow when human beings rediscover a part of themselves. And when you and I first met, I told you that we are on a journey back to the self you left long ago.”

...

“Always remember, my friend. You will create reasonably good work if you do things for yourself. But if you do things for Amy D, you will become Rembrandt incarnate. Everything you touch will become a masterpiece for the world to behold.”
abandon  ego  identity  motivation  kapil  gupta  spirit  000  000000  000000000  siddha  performance  0 
6 weeks ago by bekishore
Ever Felt Jealous of a Friend’s Achievement? Here’s How to Get Around It - The New York Times
. Our brains are programmed to feel that confusing mix of pride and jealousy, and we have the self-evaluation maintenance theory to thank.

This phenomenon was first studied by the social psychologist Abraham Tesser, who, in a 1988 study, wrote that our self-evaluation is threatened far more by loved ones who excel in areas we define ourselves by — like our work or a particular skill — than by strangers who excel in the exact same way. We instinctively compare ourselves more to people who are close to us, even though, paradoxically, it can engender bitterness.

In fact, our brains are so bent on those comparisons that in one experiment, subjects actively sabotaged their friends from succeeding.

The worst part? They weren’t even aware they were doing it.

What’s happening is this: When someone we love is successful at something we also want to be successful at, our brains subconsciously sets up a battle — fueled by our instincts for self-interest — between pride and jealousy, Shankar Vedantam writes in his fascinating book “The Hidden Brain.” We’re generally unable to say why we have these feelings, but nonetheless they are very real.
envy  jealousy  ego  desire  brain  subconscious  self.actualization  self.value 
6 weeks ago by po

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