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Smart Contract Audit Resources & Links – Crypt Bytes Tech – Medium
If you have any good resources, please do share in the comment below, will add them. Disclaimer: This is not investment or trading advice, always do your own independent research.
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3 days ago by nildram
Twitter
RT hurricanelabs "Apple macOS High Sierra Flaw: Highlighting A Gap In Enterprise Security…
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3 days ago by billford
Twitter
If you like analogies
(Do you like analogies?)
7-bit ASCII was a bit like classical physics in 1900.

For…
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3 days ago by njr0
Twitter
Some fantastic (& some hackneyed) predictions for the next year in I'll add working through what entr…
museumtrends  from twitter_favs
3 days ago by freerange_inc
Twitter
Last Hausbesetzer Standing.
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3 days ago by schmitz
make this house a home
Jack plans it carefully. A phone call, that’s the proper way to do it, and he writes down what he wants to say in case he messes up.  I’d love to have you over  I love you  I’d love to have you over.  Bitty, would you like to come over to Providence for Thanksgiving?
rating:teen  length:1001-5000  CheckPlease  Bitty/Jack 
3 days ago by sansets
Twitter
RT : Al Franken lost his senate seat.
Harvey Weinstein lost his company.
Anthony Weiner is in jail.

Roy Moore is STILL…
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3 days ago by ansel1
Twitter
Automator is the coolest thing when it works. It’s too bad Apple lost interest and hasn’t been continually expandin…
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3 days ago by albinadev
The Scallop Sees With Space-Age Eyes — Hundreds of Them - The New York Times
It’s hard to see what’s so special about a scallop. It looks a lot like a clam, mussel or any other bivalve. Inside its hinged shell lurks a musclebound creature that’s best enjoyed seared in butter.

But there’s something more to this ubiquitous entree: the scallop sees its world with hundreds of eyes. Arrayed across the opening of its shell, the eyes glitter like an underwater necklace. Each sits at the tip of its own tentacle and can be extended beyond the rim of the shell.

While some invertebrate eyes can sense only light and dark, scientists have long suspected that scallops can make out images, perhaps even recognizing predators quickly enough to jet away to safety. But scallop eyes — each about the size of a poppy seed — are so tiny and delicate that scientists have struggled to understand how they work.

Now, a team of Israeli researchers has gotten a look at the hidden sophistication of the scallop eye, thanks to powerful new microscopes. On Thursday, they reported in the journal Science that each eye contains a miniature mirror made up of millions of square tiles. The mirror reflects incoming light onto two retinas, each of which can detect different parts of the scallop’s surroundings.

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Our own eye has been likened to a camera: it uses a lens to focus light on the retina. The new research suggests that scallop eyes are more akin to another kind of technology: a reflector telescope of the sort first invented by Newton. Today, astronomers build gigantic reflector telescopes to look in deep space, and they also build their mirrors out of tiles.

“For me, Newton and Darwin come together in these eyes,” said Gáspár Jékely, a neuroscientist at the University of Exeter who was not involved in the new study.

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Earlier studies had given scientists hints that the scallop eye was weirdly complex. Each has a lens, a pair of retinas, and a mirror-like structure at the back. Scientists suspected that light passed through the lenses and the retinas, which are mostly transparent, bounced off the mirror, and struck the retinas on the return.

But no one knew how the mirror works, or why scallops needed two retinas when other animals need only one.

Benjamin A. Palmer, a postdoctoral researcher at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, and his colleagues recently used a powerful new tool known as a cryo-electron microscope to look at scallop eyes.

He and his colleagues froze slices of the eyes, making it possible to inspect the tissue down to its fine molecular details. (Last month, three pioneers of cryo-electron microscopy won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.)

Researchers have long known that the mirror in a scallop eye is made from a molecule called guanine. It’s best known as one of the main ingredients of DNA, but in some animals guanine is packed into crystals that reflect light.

Some fish have a silvery tint to their scales thanks to guanine crystals. Chameleons use guanine crystals to help them change the color of their skin. But no one knew how guanine helped scallops to see.

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Using cryo-electron microscopes, Dr. Palmer and his colleagues discovered that scallops make a kind of guanine crystal never seen before in nature: a flat square. “We were amazed,” he said. “We knew this would be something cool.”

The researchers found that the mirrors are made of twenty to thirty layers of guanine, each containing millions of squares that fit together snugly like tiles on a wall.

Image
A close-up view of a scallop’s eyes. They mirror light in much the way that gigantic space telescopes do.CreditDan-Eric Nilsson/Lund University
“To see that square tiling is completely new,” said Daniel I. Speiser, a visual ecologist at the University of South Carolina who was not involved in the study.

Dr. Palmer and his colleagues took X-rays of the scallop eyes to determine that these layers form a flat-bottomed bowl. The scientists created a computer model of the entire eye based on these findings, allowing them to trace the paths that light took as it bounced off the mirror.

Paradoxically, the guanine squares don’t reflect light on their own — they’re transparent. But their arrangement turns them into a collective mirror.

The layers of tiles are separated by thin layers of fluid, and as a ray of light passes through them, it gets bent further and further from its original direction. Eventually the light gets turned completely around, heading back toward the front of the eye.

This arrangement is well suited for underwater vision, the researchers found, because it is better at bouncing back some colors of light than others. “You have a mirror that basically reflects a hundred percent of the blue light it receives,” Dr. Palmer said. “It makes a lot of sense that it reflects all the light it has in its environment.”

The model created by Dr. Palmer and his colleagues may also solve the mystery of the two retinas. The researchers found that each retina receives sharply focused light from different parts of the animal’s field of view.

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One retina can create a sharp image of what’s right in front of the eye. The other retina gives a better view of the periphery.

Dr. Palmer speculated that scallops might use each retina to face a different challenge in their lives.

The retina that sees the central field of view might allow scallops to quickly recognize oncoming predators, allowing them to beat a hasty retreat by swimming away.

Scallops may pay attention to their peripheral vision instead when they’re searching for a spot on the sea floor where they can settle down to feed.

Each eye, the new study demonstrates, is exquisitely complex. What’s more, the hundreds of eyes on a scallop all deliver signals to a single cluster of neurons, which may combine that information to create a rich picture of the outside world.

To Dr. Speiser, it all seems like overkill. Why does a fairly ordinary bivalve need Star Wars vision technology? “It’s still a puzzle why they see so well,” he said.

Dr. Palmer said that scallop eyes may provide inspirations for new inventions. There’s certainly precedent: NASA has built X-ray detectors to study black holes that mimic lobster eyes. Perhaps an artificial scallop eye could take pictures in dim seawater.

But Dr. Palmer is more excited by the prospect of creating materials that are new to engineering. His study shows that scallops have evolved a mastery over forming crystals, guiding them into shapes that researchers didn’t think possible.

At this point, no one has any idea yet how they do it. “Understanding that could open the door to much bigger things than just making a single device,” Dr. Palmer said.
optics  biology 
3 days ago by HM0880
Twitter
I have decided that this is my favorite movie of all time and the one I would be most upset if they tampered with o…
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3 days ago by sambreed
Twitter
I get to bust out my collection of fine, itchy ass sweaters when it gets cold like this. I'm going for sea captain,…
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3 days ago by quicksilvre
Twitter
After missing last year's MLS Cup, Deuce isn't taking anything for granted.

DefendOurCup  from twitter_favs
3 days ago by jeffcarroll
Twitter
How can a baby be so shady?
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3 days ago by przcrbll
Twitter
How can a baby be so shady?
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3 days ago by lalavalse
Twitter
How can a baby be so shady?
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3 days ago by misc
Visual Studio Code is not Light Enough · Issue #14109 · Microsoft/vscode · GitHub
@HolyOne @onewhitey Can you please do the following:

JavaScript profile
Help > Toggle Developer Tools
Go to the Profiles tab
Start profiling
focus back in VSCode F1
run Reload Window
stop profiling
try to save the cpu profile (if that doesn't work, Electron has recently had issues with that), then please try to send our way some sort of high-res screenshot where you maybe hover over the long methods
Startup times
Run Code.exe --performance
F1 > Developer: Startup performance
Open the developer tools and share the numbers
This would help us find out where the time is spent
vscode 
3 days ago by HM0880
Twitter
Here’s me and playing some duo at last night. Shouts to Was a great eveni…
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3 days ago by chasowens
Hype cycle - Wikipedia
The hype cycle is a branded graphical presentation developed and used by the American research, advisory and information technology firm Gartner, for representing the maturity, adoption and social application of specific technologies. The hype cycle provides a graphical and conceptual presentation of the maturity of emerging technologies through five phases.

An example of a hype cycle is found in Amara's law[1] coined by Roy Amara,[2] which states that

We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.[3][4]
thoughts 
3 days ago by HM0880
Twitter
Keeping birth control copay-free is not easy, but for the 62.4 million women who need birth control, it’s worth it.…
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3 days ago by jeffcarroll
Twitter
Now is a pivotal time for the protection of public lands and marine protected areas. We must ensure nature’s wonder…
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3 days ago by HalSF
Vesica piscis - Wikipedia
The vesica piscis is a type of lens, a mathematical shape formed by the intersection of two disks with the same radius, intersecting in such a way that the center of each disk lies on the perimeter of the other.[1] In Latin, "vesica piscis" literally means "bladder of a fish", reflecting the shape's resemblance to the conjoined dual air bladders ("swim bladder") found in most fish. In Italian, the shape's name is mandorla ("almond").


The vesica piscis in Euclid's Elements
This figure appears in the first proposition of Euclid's Elements, where it forms the first step in constructing an equilateral triangle using a compass and straightedge. The triangle has as its vertices the two disk centers and one of the two sharp corners of the vesica piscis.[2]
math  geometry 
3 days ago by HM0880
Twitter
My latest digital article: Shoppers Need a Reason to Go to Your Store — Other Than Buying Stuff…
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3 days ago by bjp2aol
Twitter
Thank you and all Concur India for a most amazing week. Feeling inspired by all that you do for our cust…
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3 days ago by wilbur
What is Mobile CSP? | Mobile CSP
Mobile CSP is a College Board-endorsed AP Computer Science Principles based on the theme of mobile computing. The course:

Engages students in building socially useful mobile apps in App Inventor;
Uses project-based programming and computer science lessons;
Emphasizes writing & communication skills;
Fosters collaboration & creativity in the classroom.
Since 2013 the Mobile CSP project has provided professional development to more than 400 teachers throughout the U.S. and reached more than 6,000 students.  For 2017-18, there are more than 600 teachers and 10,000 students using the Mobile CSP curriculum.
education  learning  coding  mobile 
3 days ago by jtallison
Twitter
Indonesia's Freeport-Rio plan masks longer-term issues: Russell via mining
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3 days ago by rhyndes
Indonesia's Freeport-Rio plan masks longer-term issues: Russell | MINING.com
Indonesia's Freeport-Rio plan masks longer-term issues: Russell via mining
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3 days ago by rhyndes
Twitter
🐦Refined Twitter - A browser extension makes Twitter better

Let's improve Twitter together!
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3 days ago by briantrice
Twitter
This truck stop bathroom so festive it's a little unsettling.
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3 days ago by jcoffey42
Twitter
NB: Jones basically has Joe Manchin's stance on guns. Owns 'em, is okay with expanding background checks.
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3 days ago by girma
Twitter
Brexit voters are simultaneously the neglected poor, racist bigots, would-be colonialists, the cause of imminent ma…
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3 days ago by nico_macdonald
Lens (geometry) - Wikipedia
In 2-dimensional geometry, a lens is a convex set bounded by two circular arcs joined to each other at their endpoints. In order for this shape to be convex, both arcs must bow outwards (convex-convex). This shape can be formed as the intersection of two circular disks. It can also be formed as the union of two circular segments (regions between the chord of a circle and the circle itself), joined along a common chord.
math  geometry 
3 days ago by HM0880
Mark Your Calendars for a Superb Geminid Meteor Shower
Mark Your Calendars for a Superb Geminid Meteor Shower
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3 days ago by geeknik
Twitter
"A safety culture is a culture that allows the boss to hear bad news." —
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3 days ago by danyoung
Ben Ramsey on Twitter: "Considering submitting a PHP-specific talk to OSCON and tagging it for the Emerging Languages track."
Considering submitting a PHP-specific talk to OSCON and tagging it for the Emerging Languages track.

— Ben Ramsey (@ramsey) December 7, 2017
3 days ago by jtyost2
Review: THE SHAPE OF WATER
RT : is a beautiful adult fairy tale that believes that empathy and love are our greatest attributes
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3 days ago by brundlefly
Twitter
I create a whole lot of science stuff to to give opportunities to people around the world and have been doing so fo…
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3 days ago by connolly
Sorting for Humans : Natural Sort Order
As programmers, we'd do well to keep Kate's lesson in mind: ASCIIbetical does not equal alphabetical. ASCII sorting serves the needs of the computer and the compiler, but what about us human beings? Perhaps a more human-friendly natural sort option should be built into mainstream programming languages, too.
algorithms  uiux 
3 days ago by HM0880
Twitter
Remember when there was a gay wedding and they killed 6 million Christians at it.
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3 days ago by miaeaton
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