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Southern Trends Report | Philanthropy in the Southeast Region
The Southeastern Region was home to 15,439 foundations with assets of $98.5 Billion and giving of $7.0 Billion in 2014
author.grantProposal 
just now by writesquire
Welcome to the Future Nauseous - Venkatesh Rao
My new explanation is this: we live in a continuous state of manufactured normalcy. There are mechanisms that operate — a mix of natural, emergent and designed — that work to prevent us from realizing that the future is actually happening as we speak. To really understand the world and how it is evolving, you need to break through this manufactured normalcy field. Unfortunately, that leads, as we will see, to a kind of existential nausea. [...]

So what about elements of the future that arrive relatively successfully for everybody, like cellphones? Here, the idea I called the Milo Criterion kicks in: successful products are precisely those that do not attempt to move user experiences significantly, even if the underlying technology has shifted radically. In fact the whole point of user experience design is to manufacture the necessary normalcy for a product to succeed and get integrated into the Field. In this sense user experience design is reductive with respect to technological potential.

So for this bucket of experiencing the future, what we get is a Darwinian weeding out of those manifestations of the future that break the continuity of technological experience. So things like Google Wave fail. Just because something is technically feasible does not mean it can psychologically normalized into the Field.
futurism  tech  from instapaper
1 minute ago by ayjay
Sorry to burst your bubble, but don’t all Americans live in their own little worlds?
> The entire framework of the “bubble” conversation reinforces, unintentionally or not, the bias that the “real America” is white, rural and Christian. White Christian conservatives, according to what appears is the dominant assumption, have no bubble to escape because they have ownership over the social norms and cultural conventions of American identity. The atheistic, lesbian nurse in Chicago or the Muslim schoolteacher in Los Angeles should not have the expectation that the “real America” will make accommodations to understand her, but she does toil under the pressure to appreciate the “real America,” even as mainstream discourse implies that she is not part of that parochial precinct.
politics:us 
2 minutes ago by sechilds
www-personal.umich.edu
This is the map I was looking for.
IFTTT  Facebook 
3 minutes ago by craniac
[1601.04448] On Competitive Algorithms for Approximations of Top-k-Position Monitoring of Distributed Streams
Consider the continuous distributed monitoring model in which n distributed nodes, receiving individual data streams, are connected to a designated server. The server is asked to continuously monitor a function defined over the values observed across all streams while minimizing the communication. We study a variant in which the server is equipped with a broadcast channel and is supposed to keep track of an approximation of the set of nodes currently observing the k largest values. Such an approximate set is exact except for some imprecision in an ε-neighborhood of the k-th largest value. This approximation of the Top-k-Position Monitoring Problem is of interest in cases where marginal changes (e.g. due to noise) in observed values can be ignored so that monitoring an approximation is sufficient and can reduce communication.
This paper extends our results from [IPDPS'15], where we have developed a filter-based online algorithm for the (exact) Top-k-Position Monitoring Problem. There we have presented a competitive analysis of our algorithm against an offline adversary that also is restricted to filter-based algorithms. Our new algorithms as well as their analyses use new methods. We analyze their competitiveness against adversaries that use both exact and approximate filter-based algorithms, and observe severe differences between the respective powers of these adversaries.
data-structures  online-learning  algorithms  mechanism-design  control-theory  rather-interesting  to-write-about  nudge-targets  consider:looking-to-see  consider:simulation 
4 minutes ago by Vaguery
The myth of the Rust Belt revolt.
Commentators in charge of explaining Donald Trump’s surprise victory seem to have settled on the idea that the white working class in the Rust Belt played a decisive role. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
4 minutes ago by archizoo
302 Found
The Macintosh line of personal computers will soon be 32 years old. It has a venerable past… but what kind of future does it have in a declining market? On the surface the Mac appears to be thriving. If ‘Macintosh Inc.’ were an independent company, its $22. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
4 minutes ago by archizoo
How Google Is Challenging AWS – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
Big companies are often criticized for having “missed” the future — from the comfortable perch of a present where said future has come to pass, of course — but while the future is still the future incumbents are first more often than not. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
4 minutes ago by archizoo
Education Technology and the Year of Wishful Thinking
“Education technology faces an inexhaustible supply of quackery.
https://t.co/AEjicU7Bzh http://pic.twitter.com/3sXflUds6R

— Will Richardson (@willrich45) December 4, 2016
IFTTT  Twitter  ToTag 
4 minutes ago by willrichardson
Everything mattered: lessons from 2016's bizarre presidential election - Vox
Clinton lost the Electoral College, mainly due to whisker-thin losses in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. As John McCormack points out, the cumulative difference in those states was 107,330 votes. [UPDATE 12/2/16: The cumulative difference is now just under 80,000 votes.]

Just under 80,000 votes, less than the capacity of a football stadium, in a country where more than 135 million votes were cast. Roughly 0.06 percent of the national vote. Let that marinate a while.
politics  trump  election 
6 minutes ago by craniac
Rechsdiskurs: Der Allgäuer LKW-Fahrer
Hardcore-Rechte finden das (milde) Interview super, weil es den Normalen eine Stimme gibt.
semiorechts:diskurs  rechts:diskurs 
6 minutes ago by MicrowebOrg
The simple riddle that 50% of Harvard students get wrong - YouTube
Sources for scientific journals are provided below. New videos come out every Thursday so subscribe for more videos. Visit my Facebook page for more bite siz...
CavemanCircus 
8 minutes ago by thx1138
springside/springside4: A Spring Framework based, pragmatic style JavaEE application reference architecture.
springside4 - A Spring Framework based, pragmatic style JavaEE application reference architecture.
spring  code_example  tutorial  github 
10 minutes ago by tangyouhua
Suggestion Sam
Suggestion Sam — A modern day suggestion box for Slack
ProductHunt  Startup  Technology 
11 minutes ago by kpieper876
WP Offline Fallback — WordPress Plugins
WP Offline Fallback — Clinging to your visitor, even if they lost the internet.
ProductHunt  Startup  Technology 
11 minutes ago by kpieper876
Rediscovering Literacy - Venkatesh Rao
Before Gutenberg, you demonstrated true literacy not by reading a text out aloud and taking down dictation accurately, but through exposition and condensation.

You were considered literate if you could take a classic verse and expound upon it at length (exposition) and take an ambiguous idea and distill its essence into a terse verbal composition (condensation).

Exposition was more than meaning-extraction. It was a demonstration of contextualized understanding of the text, skill with both form and content, and an ability to separate both from meaning in the sense of reference to non-linguistic realities.

Condensation was the art of packing meaning into the fewest possible words. It was a higher order skill than exposition. All literate people could do some exposition, but only masters could condense well enough to produce new texts considered worthy of being added to the literary tradition.

Exposition and condensation are in fact the fundamental learned behaviors that constitute literacy, not reading and writing. One behavior dissolves densely packed words using the solvent that is the extant oral culture, enriching it, while the other distills the essence into a form that can be transmitted across cultures.

Two literate people in very different different cultures, if they are skilled at exposition, might be able to expand the same maxim (the Golden Rule for instance) into different parables. Conversely, the literary masters of an era can condense stories and philosophies discovered in their own time into culturally portable nuggets.

So the terseness of an enduring maxim is as much about cross-cultural generality as it is about compactness.
literacy  culture 
11 minutes ago by ayjay
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