How To Be a Systems Thinker | Edge.org


19 bookmarks. First posted by querolus 5 days ago.


How To Be a Systems Thinker | Edge.org https://ift.tt/2JJlkpF
IFTTT  Instapaper 
yesterday by ldodds
Conversation : TECHNOLOGY Until fairly recently, artificial intelligence didn’t learn. To create a machine that learns to think more efficiently was a big…
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2 days ago by fogus
How To Be a Systems Thinker | Edge.org via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2JJlkpF
ifttt  instapaper 
3 days ago by sshappell
At the moment, I’m asking myself how people think about complex wholes like the ecology of the planet, or the climate, or large populations of human beings that have evolved for many years in separate locations and are now re-integrating. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
3 days ago by archizoo
Conversation : TECHNOLOGY Until fairly recently, artificial intelligence didn’t learn. To create a machine that learns to think more efficiently was a big…
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4 days ago by flobosg
f you use the word "cyber" in our society now, people think that it means a device. It does not evoke the whole mystery of what maintains balance, or how a system is kept from going off kilter, which was the kind of thing that motivated the question in the first place. It’s probably not the first time that’s happened, that a technology with a very wide spectrum of uses has been so effective for certain problems that it’s obscured the other possible uses.

People are not using cybernetic models as much as they should be. In thinking about medicine, for instance, we are thinking more than we used to about what happens when fifty years ago you had chicken pox and now you have shingles. What happened? How did the virus survive? It went into hiding. It took a different form. We’re finding examples of problems that we thought we’d solved but may have made worse.
cybernetics  philosophy 
5 days ago by janpeuker
How to Be a Systems Thinker
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5 days ago by rukku
Bless his heart, he didn’t tell me he was teaching me about cybernetics. I think I would have walked out on him. Another way to say it is that he was teaching me to think about systems. Gregory coined the term "schismogenesis" in 1936, from observing the culture of a New Guinea tribe, the Iatmul, in which there was a lot of what he called schismogenesis. Schismogenesis is now called "positive feedback"; it’s what happens in an arms race. You have a point of friction, where you feel threatened by, say, another nation. So, you get a few more tanks. They look at that and say, "They’re arming against us," and they get a lot more tanks. Then you get more tanks. And they get more tanks or airplanes or bombs, or whatever it is. That’s positive feedback.

The alternative would be if you saw them getting tanks to say, "I’d better get rid of my tanks. Let’s cool the arms race, instead of mutually escalating." Gregory was talking about that and didn’t really have a term for it, so he invented the term schismogenesis. Genesis to mean bringing into being greater and greater schisms, conflicts. That was before the concept of positive feedback had been coined. That’s what he was talking about, the kind of feedback that accelerates a process rather than controls it, which is a very important concept.
system_thinking  schismogenesis 
5 days ago by tonyyet