The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think


216 bookmarks. First posted by mauty november 2016.


Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
design  skills  usability  ux 
7 weeks ago by ntschutta
About 1/3 of US adults can't use a computer for anything but the simplest one-step tasks; about 20% can't use one at all.
demographics  ux  ui  internet 
8 weeks ago by perich
Summary: Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
usability  ux 
8 weeks ago by rmohns
You are not the user. Detailed explanation of stats showing 95% of users in rich countries have low computer skills
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by mnfrancis
"Keep it extremely simple, or two thirds of the population can’t use your design."
ux  usability  design 
9 weeks ago by brunns
The 4 Levels of Technology Proficiency
The researchers defined 4 levels of proficiency, based on the types of tasks users can complete successfully. For each level, here’s the percentage of the population (averaged across the OECD countries) who performed at that level, as well as the report’s definition of the ability of people within that level.
9 weeks ago by nejanimb
Summary: Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
UX  marketing 
9 weeks ago by nitabot4000
You might say that you’re not designing for the whole of the OECD. You’re only designing for the rich and privileged country in which you most likely live. Fair enough, but the conclusions don’t change much, even when we look at the richest countries, as shown in the following chart (which is sorted in ascending order by the number of people at the highest skill level — i.e., people like yourself):
technology  stats 
9 weeks ago by dancall
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user. This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs.
9 weeks ago by pitiphong_p
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user . This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs. Since designers are so…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by josedante
definition of 'high computer skills' feels really quite low
nice-thinking 
9 weeks ago by mozzarella
If you want to target a broad consumer audience, it’s safest to assume that users’ skills are those specified for level 1. (But, remember that 14% of adults have even poorer skills, even disregarding the many who can’t use a computer at all.)
To recap, level 1 skills are:
Little or no navigation required to access the information or commands required to solve the problem
Few steps and a minimal number of operators
Problem resolution requiring the respondent to apply explicit criteria only (no implicit criteria)
Few monitoring demands (e.g., having to check one’s progress toward the goal)
Identifying content and operators done through simple match (no transformation or inferences needed)
No need to contrast or integrate information
Anything more complicated, and your design can only be used by people with skills at level 2 or 3, meaning that you’re down to serving 31% of the population in the United States, 35% in Japan and the UK, 37% in Canada and Singapore, and 38% in Northern Europe and Australia. Again, the international variations don’t matter much relative to the big-picture conclusion: keep it extremely simple, or two thirds of the population can’t use your design.
design  usability  ux 
may 2017 by simonv3
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user. This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs.
ifttt  Pocket 
march 2017 by ryanalvarado
Identifying content and operators can be done through simple match. Only simple forms of reasoning, such as assigning items to categories, are required; there is no need to contrast or integrate information.”
computer  research  reference  education  article  percentage  skills  nielsen 
february 2017 by lmjabreu
Incredibly important. '''A recent international research study allows us to quantify the difference between the broad population and the tech elite''' 200K users, classes assigned. I finally have backup for what I've long fought for
usability  nng  oecd 
december 2016 by wolfrentzsch
The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think
from twitter
december 2016 by darkgoyle
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user . This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs. Since designers are so…
from instapaper
december 2016 by dudup
The Distribution of Users' Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think https://t.co/SmPZuxAwqx by @NNGroup #webdesign #usability #hci
– Dennis Lembrée (dennisl) http://twitter.com/dennisl/status/812290467966631937
UX  a11y 
december 2016 by emilylewis
"One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user. This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs. Since designers are so different from the majority of the target audience, it’s not just irrelevant what you like or what you think is easy to use — it’s often misleading to rely on such personal preferences."
usability  skills  research 
december 2016 by sfelkar
Summary: Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.

The data was collected from 2011–2015 in 33 countries and was published in 2016 by the OECD (the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, a club of industrialized countries). In total, 215,942 people 15 to 65 were tested, with at least 5,000 participants in most countries.

What Most Users Can Do
If you want to target a broad consumer audience, it’s safest to assume that users’ skills are those specified for level 1. (But, remember that 14% of adults have even poorer skills, even disregarding the many who can’t use a computer at all.)

To recap, level 1 skills are:
* Little or no navigation required to access the information or commands required to solve the problem
* Few steps and a minimal number of operators
* Problem resolution requiring the respondent to apply explicit criteria only (no implicit criteria)
* Few monitoring demands (e.g., having to check one’s progress toward the goal)
* Identifying content and operators done through simple match (no transformation or inferences needed)
* No need to contrast or integrate information

Anything more complicated, and two thirds of the population can’t use your design.
computer  skills  study  interface  design  simplicity  demographics 
december 2016 by dandv
the Facebook app for iPad is a weapon of mass destruction.
ux  horror  demographics 
december 2016 by yorksranter
There is one more difference between you and the average user that’s even more damaging to your ability to predict what will be a good user interface: skills in using computers, the Internet, and technology in general. Anybody who’s on a web-design team or other user experience project is a veritable supergeek compared with the average population. This not just true for the developers. Even the less-technical team members are only “less-technical” in comparison with the engineers. They still have much stronger technical skills than most normal people.
design  usability  UI  UX  user 
december 2016 by Gwendoux
the distribution of users’ computer skills: worse than you think
design  usability  ux 
december 2016 by pdurlej
The meeting room task described above requires level-3 skills. Another example of level-3 task is “You want to know what percentage of the emails sent by John Smith last month were about sustainability.”
computers  design 
december 2016 by loyce
Huh interesting - The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think via
from twitter
december 2016 by greenet
Summary: Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
design  via:popular 
december 2016 by silvertongue
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user. This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  digitalliteracy 
december 2016 by hansdorsch
Summary: Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks. One of usability
december 2016 by voxmatt
"... only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities ..." | The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills
usability  design  ux  from twitter
december 2016 by maluta
One of usability’s most hard-earned lessons is that you are not the user . This is why it’s a disaster to guess at the users’ needs. Since designers are so…
from instapaper
december 2016 by nugent
Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
ux  design 
december 2016 by cjitlal
Across 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population has high computer-related abilities, and only a third of people can complete medium-complexity tasks.
design  usability  ux  skills  distribution 
december 2016 by martineno
Die Menschen können nicht mit Computern umgehen. Nirgendwo. Sehr spannende Zahlen:
december 2016 by FlowFX
The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think
from twitter
december 2016 by mandrl
DEVELOPERS ARE NOTHING LIKE USERS.
dev  webdev 
december 2016 by jayyy
RT : The Distribution of Users' Computer : Worse Than You Think
UX  usability  Skills  from twitter
december 2016 by miaridge