Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic


323 bookmarks. First posted by dermotcasey 19 days ago.


Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
2 hours ago by chadlandman
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
2 days ago by imsoper
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
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2 days ago by mackenzie
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
3 days ago by sdevore
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
xarxes 
3 days ago by oriolllado
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? (via Instapaper)
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4 days ago by laze
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
the-atlantic  smartphone  @instapaper 
7 days ago by lendamico
Apparently there's been a recent seismic shift in a variety of statistics on teens.
parenting  technology  cell-phones  depression  society 
7 days ago by mindways
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  health  social  media  tech  technology 
8 days ago by hansdorsch
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
8 days ago by pwarnock
Agree, although this scared the shit out of me

We definitely don’t understand it
from twitter
8 days ago by dvydra
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
8 days ago by timwburch
But the twin rise of the smartphone and social media has caused an earthquake of a magnitude we’ve not seen in a very long time, if ever. There is compelling evidence that the devices we’ve placed in young people’s hands are having profound effects on their lives—and making them seriously unhappy.
children  culture  technology  requiredreading 
9 days ago by scottboms
via Pocket - Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - Added August 10, 2017 at 12:34PM
9 days ago by steinmanal
The results could not be clearer: Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy.

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There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness. Eighth-graders who spend 10 or more hours a week on social media are 56 percent more likely to say they’re unhappy than those who devote less time to social media. Admittedly, 10 hours a week is a lot. But those who spend six to nine hours a week on social media are still 47 percent more likely to say they are unhappy than those who use social media even less. The opposite is true of in-person interactions. Those who spend an above-average amount of time with their friends in person are 20 percent less likely to say they’re unhappy than those who hang out for a below-average amount of time
happiness  smartphone  webasmedium  teens  planning_jkaf  mobile 
9 days ago by JohnDrake
The Atlantic
8/4/17
9 days ago by seandanaher
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
article  from instapaper
9 days ago by K3it4r0
"All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness."
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by jwtulp
RT : Have smartphones destroyed a generation? asks
from twitter
11 days ago by orta
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 days ago by basecamp
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas.
Archive  Pocket 
11 days ago by brokenrhino
I’ve been researching generational differences for 25 years, starting when I was a 22-year-old doctoral student in psychology. Typically, the characteristics that come to define a generation appear gradually, and along a continuum. Beliefs and behaviors that were already rising simply continue to do so. Millennials, for instance, are a highly individualistic generation, but individualism had been increasing since the Baby Boomers turned on, tuned in, and dropped out. I had grown accustomed to line graphs of trends that looked like modest hills and valleys. Then I began studying Athena’s generation.

Around 2012, I noticed abrupt shifts in teen behaviors and emotional states. The gentle slopes of the line graphs became steep mountains and sheer cliffs, and many of the distinctive characteristics of the Millennial generation began to disappear. In all my analyses of generational data—some reaching back to the 1930s—I had never seen anything like it.
children  culture  technology 
11 days ago by campion1581
Reading articles like this on impact of phones on MH of teenagers I want to read about relationship w/cuts to CAMHS
from twitter
12 days ago by BeckyFaith
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
smartphones  facebook  psychology 
12 days ago by mbischoff
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
12 days ago by sperte
I call them iGen.

Psychologically, however, they are more vulnerable than Millennials were: Rates of teen depression and suicide have skyrocketed since 2011. It’s not an exaggeration to describe iGen as being on the brink of the worst mental-health crisis in decades. Much of this deterioration can be traced to their phones.

Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy.

There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness.
mc  children  tech  culture  anxiety  isolation  social  development  attachment  depression  safety  media  phone  internet  chat  socialskills  smartphone  suicidality 
12 days ago by oati
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
adolescence  culture  technology 
12 days ago by ramitsethi
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
13 days ago by sneak
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas.
13 days ago by simonings
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
13 days ago by h-lame
RT : "No exceptions. All screen activities linked to less happiness. All nonscreen activities linked to more happiness."
from twitter_favs
13 days ago by awolfson
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
13 days ago by frog
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
13 days ago by toph
Continuing the dialog around the impact of smartphones on people.
13 days ago by thingles
[great great read on current technologies and how they affect youth ... who will grow up to be our next adult gens]
tech  kids 
13 days ago by cjazzlee
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
14 days ago by liebo7
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2umTmah
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14 days ago by Teecy
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
14 days ago by bluestreak123
A recently leaked Facebook document indicated that the company had been touting to advertisers its ability to determine teens’ emotional state based on their on-site behavior, and even to pinpoint “moments when young people need a confidence boost.” Facebook acknowledged that the document was real, but denied that it offers “tools to target people based on their emotional state.”
culture  technology  Psychology  parenting 
14 days ago by mkatase