Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic


436 bookmarks. First posted by dermotcasey august 2017.


More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
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yesterday by allanmcdougall
only about 56% of high-school seniors in 2015 went out on dates; for Boomers and Gen Xers: 85%
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11 days ago by david.nguyen
Teens, in turn, seem to be content with this homebody arrangement—not because they’re so studious, but because their social life is lived on their phone. They don’t need to leave home to spend time with their friends.

Facebook acknowledged that the document was real, but denied that it offers “tools to target people based on their emotional state.”
culture  technology  future 
22 days ago by jberkel
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
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24 days ago by mrmanner
"Millennials ... are a highly individualistic generation, but individualism had been increasing since the Baby Boomers turned on, tuned in, and dropped out. I had grown accustomed to line graphs of trends that looked like modest hills and valleys. Then I began studying [the current teen] generation. Around 2012, I noticed abrupt shifts in teen behaviors and emotional states. The gentle slopes of the line graphs became steep mountains and sheer cliffs, and many of the distinctive characteristics of the Millennial generation began to disappear. In all my analyses of generational data—some reaching back to the 1930s—I had never seen anything like it.

"...the trends persisted, across several years and a series of national surveys. ... What happened in 2012? ... it was exactly the moment when the proportion of Americans who owned a smartphone surpassed 50 percent.

"... a generation shaped by the smartphone and by the concomitant rise of social media. I call them iGen. Born between 1995 and 2012, members of this generation are growing up with smartphones, have an Instagram account before they start high school, and do not remember a time before the internet.

"The arrival of the smartphone has radically changed every aspect of teenagers’ lives, from the nature of their social interactions to their mental health. ... More comfortable in their bedrooms than in a car or at a party, today’s teens are physically safer than teens have ever been. They’re markedly less likely to get into a car accident and, having less of a taste for alcohol than their predecessors, are less susceptible to drinking’s attendant ills. Psychologically, however, they are more vulnerable than Millennials were: Rates of teen depression and suicide have skyrocketed since 2011. It’s not an exaggeration to describe iGen as being on the brink of the worst mental-health crisis in decades. Much of this deterioration can be traced to their phones. ... There is compelling evidence that the devices we’ve placed in young people’s hands are having profound effects on their lives—and making them seriously unhappy.

"There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness. ... Teens’ feelings of loneliness spiked in 2013 and have remained high since. ... As teens have started spending less time together, they have become less likely to kill one another, and more likely to kill themselves. In 2011, for the first time in 24 years, the teen suicide rate was higher than the teen homicide rate. ... Boys’ depressive symptoms increased by 21 percent from 2012 to 2015, while girls’ increased by 50 percent—more than twice as much. The rise in suicide, too, is more pronounced among girls. Although the rate increased for both sexes, three times as many 12-to-14-year-old girls killed themselves in 2015 as in 2007, compared with twice as many boys.

"he correlations between depression and smartphone use are strong enough to suggest that more parents should be telling their kids to put down their phone.
"Prying the phone out of our kids’ hands will be difficult, even more so than the quixotic efforts of my parents’ generation to get their kids to turn off MTV and get some fresh air."
genealogy  technology  iPhone  smartphone  sleep  depression  psychology  screen-time  devices  cellular 
4 weeks ago by Tonti
research on the kids and phones subject - adverse effects
kids  parenting  technology  phones 
4 weeks ago by emmacarlson
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. via Pocket
technology  culture  smartphones  parenting  Psychology  journalism 
5 weeks ago by myankelovich
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis. One day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas.
Starred 
5 weeks ago by driptray
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
from twitter
5 weeks ago by sherenejose
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
5 weeks ago by aapostol
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
children  culture  technology 
7 weeks ago by soobrosa
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
7 weeks ago by kamloopshoops
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
longreads  tech  psychology 
8 weeks ago by myflatworld
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2umTmah
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8 weeks ago by ono
Even when a seismic event—a war, a technological leap, a free concert in the mud—plays an outsize role in shaping a group of young people, no single factor ever defines a generation. Parenting styles continue to change, as do school curricula and culture, and these things matter. But the twin rise of the smartphone and social media has caused an earthquake of a magnitude we’ve not seen in a very long time, if ever. There is compelling evidence that the devices we’ve placed in young people’s hands are having profound effects on their lives—and making them seriously unhappy.
8 weeks ago by jatrimar
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - Striking indictment of social media & teen addictive use of tech. Yikes.
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8 weeks ago by tjweir
More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.
technology  health 
9 weeks ago by lsrgt
Troubling... but if you don't get your kid a device, are they just as unhappy because they're even more left out?
technology  culture  children  kids  attention 
9 weeks ago by ajohnson1200
There is compelling evidence that the devices we’ve placed in young people’s hands are having profound effects on their lives—and making them seriously unhappy.

(This article has been adapted from Jean M. Twenge's forthcoming book, iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy—and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood—and What That Means for the Rest of Us.)
technology  society  psychology  adulthood  iGen  socialmedia 
10 weeks ago by pgslr
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? - The Atlantic
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10 weeks ago by Stade
"The Monitoring the Future survey, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and designed to be nationally representative, has asked 12th-graders more than 1,000 questions every year since 1975 and queried eighth- and 10th-graders since 1991. The survey asks teens how happy they are and also how much of their leisure time they spend on various activities, including nonscreen activities such as in-person social interaction and exercise, and, in recent years, screen activities such as using social media, texting, and browsing the web. The results could not be clearer: Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy. There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness. "
happiness  2017_mixbook_contender  technology  adolescents  communications_devices  communication_technology 
11 weeks ago by jbushnell
screen time
technology 
11 weeks ago by atmendez
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
from instapaper
11 weeks ago by swinton
Around 2012, I noticed abrupt shifts in teen behaviors and emotional states. The gentle slopes of the line graphs became steep mountains and sheer cliffs, and many of the distinctive characteristics of the Millennial generation began to disappear. In all my analyses of generational data—some reaching back to the 1930s—I had never seen anything like it.
12 weeks ago by hoboyobo
A new Bowling Alone???

"If you were going to give advice for a happy adolescence based on this survey, it would be straightforward: Put down the phone, turn off the laptop, and do something—anything—that does not involve a screen. Of course, these analyses don’t unequivocally prove that screen time causes unhappiness; it’s possible that unhappy teens spend more time online. But recent research suggests that screen time, in particular social-media use, does indeed cause unhappiness."
j110  research  forefront  technology 
12 weeks ago by glanosga
RT : Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
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september 2017 by davidrspotts
“More comfortable online than out partying, post-Millennials are safer, physically, than adolescents have ever been. But they’re on the brink of a mental-health crisis.”
domain:Social  subdomain:Crisis  subdomain:InternetCulture  topic:YoungUsers  topic:Relationships  form:Report 
september 2017 by novom
Why is the i-Generation on the brink of a mental health crisis? From :
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september 2017 by lurrel
"Teens who spend more time on screen are more likely to be unhappy.” Period.
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september 2017 by davidvc
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
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september 2017 by StJohnBosco
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
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september 2017 by theluther
O ne day last summer, around noon, I called Athena, a 13-year-old who lives in Houston, Texas. She answered her phone—she’s had an iPhone since she was…
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september 2017 by paulozoom
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation? via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2umTmah
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september 2017 by JanWillemSwane