Shtetl-Optimized » Blog Archive » The Kolmogorov option


52 bookmarks. First posted by syskill august 2017.


Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov was one of the giants of 20th-century mathematics. I’ve always found it amazing that the same man was responsible both for…
from instapaper
august 2017 by johnrclark
The Kolmogorov option
from twitter
august 2017 by ceptional
“Every mathematician believes that he is ahead of the others. The reason none state this belief in public is because they are intelligent people.”

Hilbert said that science, unlike religion, has no need for martyrs, because it’s based on facts that can’t be denied indefinitely.
culture  philosophy  science  mathematics  ethics  via:popular 
august 2017 by gideonite
“I think that most authorities simply internalize the ruling ideology so deeply that they equate dissent with sin. So in particular, the better you can ground your case in empirical facts, the craftier and more conniving a deceiver you become in their eyes, and hence the more virtuous they are for punishing you. Someone who’s arrived at that point is completely insulated from argument: absent some crisis that makes them reevaluate their entire life, there’s no sense in even trying.… If the Inquisition had had Twitter, its favorite sentence would be ‘I can’t even.’”
truth  politicallyCorrect  culture  propaganda  lying  googleManifesto 
august 2017 by Jswindle
Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov was one of the giants of 20th-century mathematics. I’ve always found it amazing that the same man was responsible both for…
from instapaper
august 2017 by mjays
since someone could find this one day: I don't agree with scott aaronson about the google manifesto. I think Google was right to fire him. I disagree with the google manifesto. I just liked the history discussed in this post.
science 
august 2017 by trill_winds
"The reason none state this belief in public is because they are intelligent people.”
from twitter
august 2017 by TaylorPearson
"There’s a quiet dignity to Kolmogorov’s (and Galileo’s) approach: a dignity that I suspect will be alien to many, but recognizable to those in the business of science."
mathematics  science 
august 2017 by phnk
RT : This feels like it's already a classic — a post I'll be returning to again and again.
from twitter
august 2017 by levity
Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov was one of the giants of 20th-century mathematics. I’ve always found it amazing that the same man was responsible both for…
from instapaper
august 2017 by wenxin
RT : The subtweet of all time:
from twitter
august 2017 by mwickens
RT : If you ever wonder why designers love to talk about "the critic" so much:
from twitter_favs
august 2017 by schraeds
“I think that most authorities simply internalize the ruling ideology so deeply that they equate dissent with sin. So in particular, the better you can ground your case in empirical facts, the craftier and more conniving a deceiver you become in their eyes, and hence the more virtuous they are for punishing you. Someone who’s arrived at that point is completely insulated from argument: absent some crisis that makes them reevaluate their entire life, there’s no sense in even trying.… If the Inquisition had had Twitter, its favorite sentence would be ‘I can’t even.’”
mathematics  culture  science  scott-aaronson 
august 2017 by personalnadir
To an Inquisitor, “good heretic” doesn’t parse any better than “round square,” and the very utterance of such a phrase is an invitation to mockery. If the Inquisition had had Twitter, its favorite sentence would be “I can’t even.”
truth  hypocrisy  stalinism  ethics  lynch 
august 2017 by pmigdal
When it comes to the amount of flak one takes for defending controversial views in public under one’s own name, I defer to almost no one.  For anyone tempted,…
from instapaper
august 2017 by TuckerMax
Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov was one of the giants of 20th-century mathematics. I’ve always found it amazing that the same man was responsible both for establishing the foundations of classical probability theory in the 1930s, and also for co-inventing the theory of algorithmic randomness (a.k.a. Kolmogorov complexity) in the 1960s, which challenged the classical foundations, by holding that it is possible after all to talk about the entropy of an individual object, without reference to any ensemble from which the object was drawn. Incredibly, going strong into his eighties, Kolmogorov then pioneered the study of “sophistication,” which amends Kolmogorov complexity to assign low values both to “simple” objects and “random” ones, and high values only to a third category of objects, which are “neither simple nor random.” So, Kolmogorov was at the vanguard of the revolution, counter-revolution, and counter-counter-revolution.
culture  mathematics  history  ethics  Kolmogorov  conflict  truth  restraint 
august 2017 by zzkt
Andrey Nikolaevich Kolmogorov was one of the giants of 20th-century mathematics. I’ve always found it amazing that the same man was responsible both for…
from instapaper
august 2017 by dainiusblynas
Excellent meta-discussion--
from twitter_favs
august 2017 by ejl
Truth is the wrong word.
s 
august 2017 by jgordon
Scott Aaronson on why Kolmogorov was an amazing mathematician, and why ethical people may wish to remain silent and take no actions about injustices they perceive.
ethics  ScottAaronson  philosophy  history  math  via:HackerNews 
august 2017 by mcherm
2017-08-08, by Scott Aaronson,

"(...) Kolmogorov knew better than to pick fights he couldn’t win. He judged that he could best serve the cause of truth by building up an enclosed little bubble of truth, and protecting that bubble from interference by the Soviet system, and even making the bubble useful to the system wherever he could—rather than futilely struggling to reform the system, and simply making martyrs of himself and all his students for his trouble.

There’s a saying of Kolmogorov, which associates wisdom with keeping your mouth shut:

“Every mathematician believes that he is ahead of the others. The reason none state this belief in public is because they are intelligent people.”

There’s also a story that Kolmogorov loved to tell about himself, which presents math as a sort of refuge from the arbitrariness of the world: he said that he once studied to become a historian, but was put off by the fact that historians demanded ten different proofs for the same proposition, whereas in math, a single proof suffices. (...)"
science  religion  politics  philosophy  truth  strategy 
august 2017 by eric.brechemier
“I think that most authorities simply internalize the ruling ideology so deeply that they equate dissent with sin. So in particular, the better you can ground your case in empirical facts, the craftier and more conniving a deceiver you become in their eyes, and hence the more virtuous they are for punishing you. Someone who’s arrived at that point is completely insulated from argument: absent some crisis that makes them reevaluate their entire life, there’s no sense in even trying.… If the Inquisition had had Twitter, its favorite sentence would be ‘I can’t even.’”
mathematics  science  culture  scott-aaronson 
august 2017 by syskill