macOS Catalina: The MacStories Review - MacStories


17 bookmarks. First posted by hansdorsch 16 days ago.


Ironically, Apple chose to name this year’s update to macOS after an island. Since the iPhone and iOS took off, macOS has sometimes felt like an island isolated from the rest of the company’s OSes, but the goal articulated by the company at WWDC this year was quite the opposite. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
22 hours ago by celler
Ironically, Apple chose to name this year’s update to macOS after an island. Since the iPhone and iOS took off, macOS has sometimes felt like an island isolated from the rest of the company’s OSes, but the goal articulated by the company at WWDC this year was quite the opposite. Apple clearly telegraphed that change is coming to the Mac and it’s designed to bridge the user experiences between each of its platforms.
To developers, that message came in the form of Catalyst and SwiftUI. Catalyst, which was previewed as an unnamed ‘Sneak Peek’ in 2018, is meant to make it easier for iPadOS developers to bring their apps to the Mac. SwiftUI has a similar longer-term goal of unifying and streamlining how developers build the interfaces for their apps across a range of devices, for everything from the Apple Watch to the Mac.
The efforts to draw macOS in closer with Apple’s other operating systems run deeper than just developer tools though. macOS may have been the foundation on which iOS was built, but in the years that followed iOS’s introduction, the two OSes grew apart. Identically-named apps were developed on different schedules, which meant they rarely included the same features. Also, system-level functionality like System Preferences, which serves the same purpose as iOS’s Settings app, was unfamiliar, making Mac adoption unnecessarily hard for newcomers. Catalina is an attempt to address those kinds of inconsistent user experiences.
With Catalina, Apple has taken clear, though not always successful, steps to bridge the divide between the Mac and iOS. App functionality has been realigned, System Preferences has been rearranged, and new features have been added to make it easier to move from one platform to the other.
macOS  10.15  review 
14 days ago by rgl7194
If you want to know everything you ever wanted to about macOS Catalina, this is one of the two articles for you. 👩‍💻
_brief 
15 days ago by thingles
In-depth Catalina review: iTunes breakup is a success and Catalyst disappoints but it is the first step to integrate macOS into an unbroken computing continuum
15 days ago by joeo10
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
from instapaper
15 days ago by danbee
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
from instapaper
16 days ago by blanghals
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
from instapaper
16 days ago by kerim
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
IFTTT  Instapaper 
16 days ago by broderboy
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
from instapaper
16 days ago by adamparnes
All the Rest QuickTime As I covered at the outset of this review, the release of Catalina completes Apple’s multi-year transition from 32- to 64-bit apps. That…
from instapaper
16 days ago by fintelkai
Ironically, Apple chose to name this year’s update to macOS after an island. Since the iPhone and iOS took off, macOS has sometimes felt like an island isolated from the rest of the company’s OSes, but the goal articulated by the company at WWDC this year was quite the opposite. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
16 days ago by larstomas
Ironically, Apple chose to name this year’s update to macOS after an island. Since the iPhone and iOS took off, macOS has sometimes felt like an island isolated from the rest of the company’s OSes, but the goal articulated by the company at WWDC this year was quite the opposite. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
16 days ago by hansdorsch