Free Money: The Surprising Effects of a Basic Income Supplied by a Tribal Government | WIRED


30 bookmarks. First posted by skinnyj 11 days ago.


Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town of Cherokee, North Carolina, attending Western Carolina University on a football scholarship. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
7 days ago by domingogallardo
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town of Cherokee, North Carolina, attending Western Carolina University on a football scholarship.
Archive 
7 days ago by Javaking
Results from early (unintended) Universal Basic Income experiments are unexpected. Great article.
from twitter_favs
7 days ago by sprague
Results from early (unintended) Universal Basic Income experiments are unexpected. Great article.
from twitter_favs
7 days ago by Pheelmore
Results from early (unintended) Universal Basic Income experiments are unexpected. Great article.
from twitter_favs
7 days ago by philcrissman
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town of Cherokee, North Carolina, attending Western Carolina University on a football scholarship. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 days ago by egwillim
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
9 days ago by breau
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
9 days ago by dshack
When the study began, about 67 percent of the American Indian kids were living below the poverty line. It wasn’t until after the casino opened that Costello began to notice that household income among the Cherokee families was going up. It was subtle at first, but the trend turned sharply upward as time went on, eventually lifting 14 percent of the Cherokee children in the study above the poverty line. Household income for those families who were not Cherokee, meanwhile, grew at a slower rate.

It was an awakening for Costello, who had accidentally stumbled onto an entirely new line of inquiry on the impact of unconditional cash transfers on the poor. “I suddenly thought, ‘Oh my god,’” Costello remembers.

Before the casino opened, Costello found that poor children scored twice as high as those who were not poor for symptoms of psychiatric disorders. But after the casino opened, the children whose families’ income rose above the poverty rate showed a 40 percent decrease in behavioral problems. Just four years after the casino opened, they were, behaviorally at least, no different from the kids who had never been poor at all.
ubi 
9 days ago by craniac

What does universal basic income do for poor kids? It makes them indistinguishable, on behavioral measures, from children who have never been poor. It also reduces drug addiction. https://www.wired.com/story/free-money-the-surprising-effects-of-a-basic-income-supplied-by-government/
9 days ago by amy
Free Money: The Surprising Effects of a Basic Income Supplied by Government via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2yuhLNW
IFTTT  Instapaper  Archive  Article 
9 days ago by TypingPixels
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town of Cherokee, North Carolina, attending Western Carolina University on a football scholarship.
Archive  pocket 
9 days ago by cronco
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
9 days ago by alphex
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
9 days ago by pwarnock
Thanks to a profitable casino, an Indian tribe gives its members sizeable cash payments. It’s called a basic income and might be the solution to job losses brought on by automation and globalization.
10 days ago by joeo10
These biannual, unconditional cash disbursements go by different names among the members of the tribe. Officially, they’re called “per capita payments.” McCoy’s kids call it their “big money.” But a certain kind of Silicon Valley idealist might call it something else: a universal basic income.
10 days ago by spectrevision
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
11 days ago by cspathis
Skooter McCoy was 20 years old when his wife, Michelle, gave birth to their first child, a son named Spencer. It was 1996, and McCoy was living in the tiny town…
from instapaper
11 days ago by skinnyj