Reality has a surprising amount of detail


127 bookmarks. First posted by empiricus may 2017.


My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of standing outside in the cold. Reality has a surprising amount of detail
Archive  best  stories  hacker  news 
10 days ago by Agiza
Reality has a surprising amount of detail (2017) via Instapaper http://johnsalvatier.org/blog/2017/reality-has-a-surprising-amount-of-detail
IFTTT  Instapaper 
10 days ago by zhangtai
The more difficult your mission, the more details there will be that are critical to understand for success.

You might hope that these surprising details are irrelevant to your mission, but not so. Some of them will end up being key.
You might also hope that the important details will be obvious when you run into them, but not so. Such details aren’t automatically visible, even when you’re directly running up against them. Things can just seem messy and noisy instead.

Before you’ve noticed important details they are, of course, basically invisible. It’s hard to put your attention on them because you don’t even know what you’re looking for. But after you see them they quickly become so integrated into your intuitive models of the world that they become essentially transparent. Do you remember the insights that were crucial in learning to ride a bike or drive? How about the details and insights you have that led you to be good at the things you’re good at?

This means it’s really easy to get stuck. Stuck in your current way of seeing and thinking about things. Frames are made out of the details that seem important to you. The important details you haven’t noticed are invisible to you, and the details you have noticed seem completely obvious and you see right through them. This all makes makes it difficult to imagine how you could be missing something important.
science 
11 days ago by lehmannro
Almost everything seems very simple until you dig into the details, then turns out to be much more complex than you expected. Prepare for this.
complexity  programming  philosophy  via:HackerNews 
11 days ago by mcherm
13 May 2017 I. My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of…
from instapaper
12 days ago by mojacc
This is quite legendary and underrated blog that is being hat-tipped here:
from twitter_favs
12 days ago by transposition
you might think that the fiddliness of programming is a special feature of programming, but really it’s that everything is fiddly, but you only notice the fiddliness when you’re new, and in programming you do new things more often.

Applies to physics etc. and explains "why its so easy for people to end up intellectually stuck. Even when they’re literally the best in the world in their field."
culture  life  programming 
july 2019 by whyitsjeff
"That’s how I came to spend a substantial part of my teenage years replacing fences, digging trenches, and building flooring and sheds. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned from all this building, it’s that reality has a surprising amount of detail."
notes 
january 2019 by keithpeter
"""I kept arguing because I thought I was right. I felt really annoyed with him and he was annoyed with me. In retrospect, I think I saw the fundamental difficulty in what we were doing and I don’t think he appreciated it (look at the stairs picture and see if you can figure it out), he just heard ‘let’s draw some diagrams and compute the angle’ and didn’t think that was the solution, and if he had appreciated the thing that I saw I think he would have been more open to drawing some diagrams. But at the same time, he also understood that diagrams and math don’t account for the shape of the wood, which I did not appreciate. If we had been able to get these points across, we could have come to consensus. Drawing a diagram was probably a good idea, but computing the angle was probably not. Instead we stayed annoyed at each other for the next 3 hours."""
psychology  systems  system-thinking 
january 2019 by kevinr
Reality has a surprising amount of detail

“Do you remember the insights that were crucial…
software_design  se  modeling  reality  from twitter
december 2018 by Confusion
"Reality has a surprising amount of detail"
from twitter_favs
december 2018 by ndfine
This problem is not easy to fix, but it’s not impossible either. I’ve mostly fixed it for myself. The direction for improvement is clear: seek detail you would not normally notice about the world. When you go for a walk, notice the unexpected detail in a flower or what the seams in the road imply about how the road was built. When you talk to someone who is smart but just seems so wrong, figure out what details seem important to them and why. In your work, notice how that meeting actually wouldn’t have accomplished much if Sarah hadn’t pointed out that one thing. As you learn, notice which details actually change how you think.

If you wish to not get stuck, seek to perceive what you have not yet perceived.
learning  research  woodwork 
december 2018 by pozorvlak
Reality has a surprising amount of detail via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2qEaI5c
IFTTT  Instapaper 
november 2018 by craniac
13 May 2017 I. My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of…
from instapaper
november 2018 by dylan
The direction for improvement is clear: seek detail you would not normally notice about the world.
universe  complexity  life  programming  culture 
april 2018 by Ciudilo
For anyone who's ever asked 'How hard can it be??'
from twitter_favs
march 2018 by gglanzani
My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of standing outside in the cold. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
february 2018 by christos
My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of standing outside in the cold.
Pocket 
february 2018 by iiska
Reality has a surprising amount of detail 13 May 2017 I. My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For…
from instapaper
january 2018 by h-lame
Before you’ve noticed important details they are, of course, basically invisible. It’s hard to put your attention on them because you don’t even know what you’re looking for. But after you see them they quickly become so integrated into your intuitive models of the world that they become essentially transparent. Do you remember the insights that were crucial in learning to ride a bike or drive?
writing  lifehacks 
january 2018 by dwhite
If you’re a programmer, you might think that the fiddliness of programming is a special feature of programming, but really it’s that everything is fiddly, but you only notice the fiddliness when you’re new, and in programming you do new things more often.
cognition  complexity  culture  programming  life 
january 2018 by jtth
While talking to my 6yo about how to boil water, I realise reality is often better when broken down into steps.
from twitter
january 2018 by topgold
Reality has a surprising amount of detail
from twitter
january 2018 by Baptiste
If you’re a programmer, you might think that the fiddliness of programming is a special feature of programming, but really it’s that everything is fiddly, but you only notice the fiddliness when you’re new, and in programming you do new things more often.
complexity  programming 
january 2018 by itrasbiel
Reality has a surprising amount of detail 13 May 2017 I. My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For…
from instapaper
january 2018 by rolphrecto
Before you’ve noticed important details they are, of course, basically invisible. It’s hard to put your attention on them because you don’t even know what you’re looking for. But after you see them they quickly become so integrated into your intuitive models of the world that they become essentially transparent. Do you remember the insights that were crucial in learning to ride a bike or drive? How about the details and insights you have that led you to be good at the things you’re good at?

This means it’s really easy to get stuck. Stuck in your current way of seeing and thinking about things. Frames are made out of the details that seem important to you. The important details you haven’t noticed are invisible to you, and the details you have noticed seem completely obvious and you see right through them. This all makes makes it difficult to imagine how you could be missing something important.

...

The direction for improvement is clear: seek detail you would not normally notice about the world. When you go for a walk, notice the unexpected detail in a flower or what the seams in the road imply about how the road was built. When you talk to someone who is smart but just seems so wrong, figure out what details seem important to them and why. In your work, notice how that meeting actually wouldn’t have accomplished much if Sarah hadn’t pointed out that one thing. As you learn, notice which details actually change how you think.

If you wish to not get stuck, seek to perceive what you have not yet perceived.
cognition 
january 2018 by madamim
...you’ve probably had the experience of doing something for the first time, maybe growing vegetables or using a Haskell package for the first time, and being frustrated by how many annoying snags there were. Then you got more practice and then you told yourself ‘man, it was so simple all along, I don’t know why I had so much trouble’. We run into a fundamental property of the universe and mistake it for a personal failing.
january 2018 by Styrke
My dad emigrated from Colombia to North America when he was 18 looking looking for a better life. For my brother and I that meant a lot of standing outside in the cold. via Pocket
pocket  favorites 
january 2018 by bschlagel
Before you’ve noticed important details they are, of course, basically invisible. It’s hard to put your attention on them because you don’t even know what you’re looking for. But after you see them they quickly become so integrated into your intuitive models of the world that they become essentially transparent. Do you remember the insights that were crucial in learning to ride a bike or drive? How about the details and insights you have that led you to be good at the things you’re good at?

This means it’s really easy to get stuck. Stuck in your current way of seeing and thinking about things. Frames are made out of the details that seem important to you. The important details you haven’t noticed are invisible to you, and the details you have noticed seem completely obvious and you see right through them. This all makes makes it difficult to imagine how you could be missing something important.
cognition  complexity  culture  life  programming 
january 2018 by euler