Donald Trump Is the First White President - The Atlantic


290 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 18 days ago.


RT : "His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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20 hours ago by wjlroe
RT : "His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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yesterday by ahsonwardak
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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yesterday by jolilius
RT : "His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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yesterday by shakeel
The First White President via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2xcOJph
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yesterday by mrtomwebster
"His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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yesterday by lalavalse
"His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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yesterday by nickrsearcy
"His ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power..."
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yesterday by josephschmitt
The First White President via Instapaper
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3 days ago by allanlasser
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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4 days ago by bdeskin
The First White President via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2waddu5
IFTTT  Instapaper 
5 days ago by rpnicholls
It has long been an axiom among certain black writers and thinkers that while whiteness endangers the bodies of black people in the immediate sense, the larger threat is to white people themselves, the shared country, and even the whole world. There is an impulse to blanch at this sort of grandiosity. When W. E. B. Du Bois claims that slavery was “singularly disastrous for modern civilization” or James Baldwin claims that whites “have brought humanity to the edge of oblivion: because they think they are white,” the instinct is to cry exaggeration. But there really is no other way to read the presidency of Donald Trump. The first white president in American history is also the most dangerous president—and he is made more dangerous still by the fact that those charged with analyzing him cannot name his essential nature, because they too are implicated in it.
politics  society 
9 days ago by corrales
If you haven't read it yet, do so now:

Donald Trump Is the First White President by
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9 days ago by skybondsor
The First White President @tanehisicoates, this essay is so outstandingly good. It also left me very, very sad.
10 days ago by casfindad
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
2017-09  race  power  racism  politics  history  longform 
11 days ago by Weaverbird
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
politics  racism  USA  Trump 
12 days ago by mirthe
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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12 days ago by matthewburton
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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12 days ago by adrian802
Ta-Nehisi Coates seems to defy his own editorial standards here ( / )
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13 days ago by matthewog
Trump truly is something new—the first president whose entire political existence hinges on the fact of a black president. And so it will not suffice to say that Trump is a white man like all the others who rose to become president. He must be called by his rightful honorific—America’s first white president.
article  author:ta-nehisi.coates  racism  politics 
13 days ago by partofthewhole
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
Politica 
13 days ago by TomasMartinez
The Atlantic 10/17 issue
news  race 
13 days ago by jwjnational
The First White President - It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
IFTTT  Instapaper  read  article 
13 days ago by AaronLMGoodwin
With one immediate exception, Trump’s predecessors made their way to high office through the passive power of whiteness—that bloody heirloom which cannot ensure mastery of all events but can conjure a tailwind for most of them
politics  race  essays 
13 days ago by cipherpolice
The first white president in American history is also the most dangerous president—and he is made more dangerous still by the fact that those charged with analyzing him cannot name his essential nature, because they too are implicated in it.
UnitedStates  DonaldTrump  BarackObama  Racism  TaNehisiCoates  Politics 
14 days ago by gregg
An analysis of exit polls conducted during the presidential primaries estimated the median household income of Trump supporters to be about $72,000. But even this lower number is almost double the median household income of African Americans, and $15,000 above the American median. Trump’s white support was not determined by income.

It is often said that Trump has no real ideology, which is not true—his ideology is white supremacy, in all its truculent and sanctimonious power. Trump inaugurated his campaign by casting himself as the defender of white maidenhood against Mexican “rapists,” only to be later alleged by multiple accusers, and by his own proud words, to be a sexual violator himself. White supremacy has always had a perverse sexual tint. Trump’s rise was shepherded by Steve Bannon, a man who mocks his white male critics as “cucks.” The word, derived from cuckold, is specifically meant to debase by fear and fantasy—the target is so weak that he would submit to the humiliation of having his white wife lie with black men. That the slur cuck casts white men as victims aligns with the dicta of whiteness, which seek to alchemize one’s profligate sins into virtue. So it was with Virginia slaveholders claiming that Britain sought to make slaves of them. So it was with marauding Klansmen organized against alleged rapes and other outrages. So it was with a candidate who called for a foreign power to hack his opponent’s email and who now, as president, is claiming to be the victim of “the single greatest witch hunt of a politician in American history.”

The mind seizes trying to imagine a black man extolling the virtues of sexual assault on tape (“When you’re a star, they let you do it”), fending off multiple accusations of such assaults, immersed in multiple lawsuits for allegedly fraudulent business dealings, exhorting his followers to violence, and then strolling into the White House. But that is the point of white supremacy—to ensure that that which all others achieve with maximal effort, white people (particularly white men) achieve with minimal qualification. Barack Obama delivered to black people the hoary message that if they work twice as hard as white people, anything is possible. But Trump’s counter is persuasive: Work half as hard as black people, and even more is possible.

But if the broad and remarkable white support for Donald Trump can be reduced to the righteous anger of a noble class of smallville firefighters and evangelicals, mocked by Brooklyn hipsters and womanist professors into voting against their interests, then the threat of racism and whiteness, the threat of the heirloom, can be dismissed. Consciences can be eased; no deeper existential reckoning is required.

That challenge of differentiation has largely been ignored. Instead, an imagined white working class remains central to our politics and to our cultural understanding of those politics, not simply when it comes to addressing broad economic issues but also when it comes to addressing racism. At its most sympathetic, this belief holds that most Americans—regardless of race—are exploited by an unfettered capitalist economy.

If anyone should be angered by the devastation wreaked by the financial sector and a government that declined to prosecute the perpetrators, it is African Americans—the housing crisis was one of the primary drivers in the past 20 years of the wealth gap between black families and the rest of the country. But the cultural condescension toward and economic anxiety of black people is not news. Toiling blacks are in their proper state; toiling whites raise the specter of white slavery.

Certainly not every Trump voter is a white supremacist, just as not every white person in the Jim Crow South was a white supremacist. But every Trump voter felt it acceptable to hand the fate of the country over to one.

That Trump ran and won on identity politics is beyond Lilla’s powers of conception. What appeals to the white working class is ennobled. What appeals to black workers, and all others outside the tribe, is dastardly identitarianism. All politics are identity politics—except the politics of white people, the politics of the bloody heirloom.

In 2016, Trump enjoyed majority or plurality support among every economic branch of whites. It is true that his strongest support among whites came from those making $50,000 to $99,999. This would be something more than working-class in many nonwhite neighborhoods, but even if one accepts that branch as the working class, the difference between how various groups in this income bracket voted is revealing. Sixty-one percent of whites in this “working class” supported Trump. Only 24 percent of Hispanics and 11 percent of blacks did. Indeed, the plurality of all voters making less than $100,000 and the majority making less than $50,000 voted for the Democratic candidate. So when Packer laments the fact that “Democrats can no longer really claim to be the party of working people—not white ones, anyway,” he commits a kind of category error. The real problem is that Democrats aren’t the party of white people—working or otherwise. White workers are not divided by the fact of labor from other white demographics; they are divided from all other laborers by the fact of their whiteness.

The first black president found that he was personally toxic to the GOP base. An entire political party was organized around the explicit aim of negating one man. It was thought by Obama and some of his allies that this toxicity was the result of a relentless assault waged by Fox News and right-wing talk radio. Trump’s genius was to see that it was something more, that it was a hunger for revanche so strong that a political novice and accused rapist could topple the leadership of one major party and throttle the heavily favored nominee of the other.

In a recent New Yorker article, a former Russian military officer pointed out that interference in an election could succeed only where “necessary conditions” and an “existing background” were present. In America, that “existing background” was a persistent racism, and the “necessary condition” was a black president. The two related factors hobbled America’s ability to safeguard its electoral system. As late as July 2016, a majority of Republican voters doubted that Barack Obama had been born in the United States, which is to say they did not view him as a legitimate president.

It is as if the white tribe united in demonstration to say, “If a black man can be president, then any white man—no matter how fallen—can be president.” And in that perverse way, the democratic dreams of Jefferson and Jackson were fulfilled.
trump  atlanticmag 
14 days ago by s218611
"that which all others achieve w/maximal effort, white ppl (particularly white men) achieve w/minimal qualification"
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14 days ago by andriak
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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14 days ago by paulozoom
“It is as if the white tribe united in demonstration to say, “If a black man can be president, then any white man—no matter how fallen—can be president.” And in that perverse way, the democratic dreams of Jefferson and Jackson were fulfilled.”
politics  race  racism  america 
14 days ago by shusta
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate…
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14 days ago by rubywhite
Print this out. Read it on your lunch break. A vastly important & chillingly true assessment of modern US history.
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15 days ago by thomwithoutanh
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
15 days ago by jokela
To Trump, whiteness is neither notional nor symbolic but is the very core of his power

“There is a tremendous amount of anger and frustration among working-class whites, particularly where there is an economic downturn,” a researcher told the Los Angeles Times. “These people feel left out; they feel government is not responsive to them.” By this logic, postwar America—with its booming economy and low unemployment—should have been an egalitarian utopia and not the violently segregated country it actually was.

It’s worth asking why the country has not been treated to a raft of sympathetic portraits of this “forgotten” young black electorate, forsaken by a Washington bought off by Davos elites and special interests. The unemployment rate for young blacks (20.6 percent) in July 2016 was double that of young whites (9.9 percent). And since the late 1970s, William Julius Wilson and other social scientists following in his wake have noted the disproportionate effect that the decline in manufacturing jobs has had on African American communities. If anyone should be angered by the devastation wreaked by the financial sector and a government that declined to prosecute the perpetrators, it is African Americans—the housing crisis was one of the primary drivers in the past 20 years of the wealth gap between black families and the rest of the country. But the cultural condescension toward and economic anxiety of black people is not news. Toiling blacks are in their proper state; toiling whites raise the specter of white slavery.
15 days ago by hakan
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
barack-obama  donald-trump  racism 
15 days ago by sfriedenberg
RT : This is so good. There's even an audio version. Read it or listen to it – just make sure you learn from it.
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15 days ago by hypatia
It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact. With one immediate exception, Trump’s predecessors made their way to high office through the passive power of whiteness—that bloody heirloom which cannot ensure mastery of all events but can conjure a tailwind for most of them.
16 days ago by jffcrmr
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy.
workingclass  incomeinequality  racialdivision 
16 days ago by tmks9933
Since November 2016, I've often felt uneasy about my white heritage.
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16 days ago by topgold
Trump as America's 'First White President' - long but v insightful read
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16 days ago by sherenejose
Contra TNC, I believe the hopelessness of the non-college amplified nascent racism.
s 
16 days ago by jgordon
RT : TNC basically published a more meticulously reasoned transcript of every black writer group text I'm in since Nov
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16 days ago by DocDre
The foundation of Donald Trump’s presidency is the negation of Barack Obama’s legacy. It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact.
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16 days ago by RobertHjames