The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists” | Ars Technica


34 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy 9 weeks ago.


As if we all needed another reason to adore the (see: ), check out this int…
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5 weeks ago by ljegou
Though perhaps the most simple and effective tool of all comes from the Wayback Machine itself—the site allows anyone to manually send a link to the Internet Archive for archiving right from its homepage. “If I’m walking my cat in the garden and I see a story in Google News, you can send it to a printer. But today you can also send it to the Internet Archive,” Graham says. He estimated up to one million captures per week can come from that.
internet  library  library2.0  libraries  history  memory  WaybackMachine  verification 
7 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
“I’ve got government video of how to wash your hands or prep for nuclear war ,” says Mark Graham, director of the Wayback Machine at the Internet Archive. The growing audio and music portion of the Internet Archive covers radio news, podcasting, and physical media (like a collection of 200,000 78s recently donated by the Boston Library). Officially, that section involves 300,000-plus overall software titles, “so you can actually play Oregon Trail on an old Apple C computer through a browser right now—no advertising, no tracking users,” Graham says. Ars has used it numerous times, for everything from catching changes in Comcast’s net neutrality pledge to seeing how Defense Distributed’s organizational description evolved. As a former VP at NBC News (hence his willingness to attend ONA, perhaps), Graham also proudly points to the site being referenced roughly five times a day within media.
7 weeks ago by sechilds
via Pocket - The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists” - Added October 15, 2018 at 09:42PM
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7 weeks ago by redmeades
AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix.
internet 
8 weeks ago by jeffhammond
The internet archive <3
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8 weeks ago by knutmelvaer
Though perhaps the most simple and effective tool of all comes from the Wayback Machine itself—the site allows anyone to manually send a link to the Internet Archive for archiving right from its homepage. “If I’m walking my cat in the garden and I see a story in Google News, you can send it to a printer. But today you can also send it to the Internet Archive,” Graham says. He estimated up to one million captures per week can come from that.
internet  history  tech 
8 weeks ago by sandykoe
AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix. Want to read Brett Kavanaugh buddy Mark Judge’s old book, for instance (or their now infamous yearbook even)?
8 weeks ago by asimpson
Wayback Machine Director Mark Graham outlines the scale of everyone's favorite archive.
digest 
8 weeks ago by iandick
The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists” | AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix. Want to read Brett Kavanaugh buddy Mark… | https://ift.tt/2Qy1f8s | via Instapaper and IFTTT
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8 weeks ago by habi
I’m a fan of Internet Archive. 🧡
_brief 
8 weeks ago by thingles
AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix.
Archive  instapaper  tenpla 
8 weeks ago by WFreeland
Wayback machine and internet archive are doing such important work.
archive  internet 
9 weeks ago by traggett
The Internet Archive stores a total of 22 petabytes, adds four petabytes per year, and uses ~7,000 processes crawling the web to capture 1.5 billion items per week
9 weeks ago by joeo10
The company currently stands as the second-largest scanner of books in the world, next to Google. Graham put the current total above four million. The archive even has a wishlist for its next 1.5 million scans, including anything cited on Wikipedia. Yes, the Wayback Machine is in the process of making sure you’re not finding 404s during any Wiki rabbithole (Graham recently told the BBC that Wayback bots have restored nearly six million pages lost to linkrot as part of that effort). Today, books published prior to 1923 are free to download through the Internet Archive, and a lot of the stuff from afterwards can be borrowed as a digital copy.
twig  688 
9 weeks ago by leolaporte
Nathan Mattise:
<p>the Internet Archive offers much more than text these days. Its broadcast-news collection covers more than 1.6 million news programs with tools such as the ability to search for words in chyrons and access to recent news (broadcasts are embargoed for 24 hours and then delivered to visitors in searchable two-minute chunks). The growing audio and music portion of the Internet Archive covers radio news, podcasting, and physical media (like a collection of 200,000 78s recently donated by the Boston Library). And as Ars has written about, the organization boasts an extensive classic video game collection that anyone can boot up in a browser-based emulator for research or leisure. Officially, that section involves 300,000-plus overall software titles, “so you can actually play Oregon Trail on an old Apple C computer through a browser right now—no advertising, no tracking users,” [Wayback Machine director for the Internet Archive, Mark] Graham says.

“Some might call us hoarders,” he says. “I like to say we’re archivists.”

In total, Graham says the Internet Archive adds four petabytes of information per year (that's four million gigabytes, for context). The organization’s current data totals 22 petabytes—but the Internet Archive actually holds on to 44 petabytes worth. “Because we’re paranoid,” Graham says. “Machines can go down, and we have a reputation.” That NASA-ish ethos helped the non-profit once survive nearly $600,000 worth of fire damage—all without any archived data loss.</p>

Search words in chyrons (the text that flows along the bottom of screens). Now there's a thing. What if we just tried to tell the story of the world in chyrons? How would a day look?
internet  wayback  archive 
9 weeks ago by charlesarthur
RT : "[T]he scale of the Internet Archive today may be as hard to fathom as the scale of the itself":
Internet  ethics  from twitter
9 weeks ago by mshook
AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix. Want to read Brett Kavanaugh buddy Mark…
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9 weeks ago by robw
The Internet’s keepers? “Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists”
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9 weeks ago by verwinv
AUSTIN, Texas—As much as subscription services want you to believe it, not everything can be found on Amazon or Netflix. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago by Werderbach
Little article and interview with the director of the Wayback Machine of the Internet Archive
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9 weeks ago by esalor
"The Internet’s keepers? 'Some call us hoarders—I like to say we’re archivists',” Ars Technica via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2Qy1f8s
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9 weeks ago by stephenfrancoeur