I was a drug rep. I know how pharma companies pushed opioids. - The Washington Post


7 bookmarks. First posted by noiseguy 13 days ago.


I was a drug rep. I know how pharma companies pushed opioids. - The Washington Post
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12 days ago by jjlsetter
RT : An emergency room doctor used to be a drug rep. And he relates the tricks of the trade
"in…
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13 days ago by rickc57
RT : An emergency room doctor used to be a drug rep. And he relates the tricks of the trade
"in…
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13 days ago by CamiloEL
For every dollar the pharmaceutical industry spends on research and development, it spends two on marketing . When I worked as a pharmaceutical sales…
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13 days ago by alexdunae
For every dollar the pharmaceutical industry spends on research and development, it spends two on marketing. When I worked as a pharmaceutical sales representative in the neuroscience division of Eli Lilly, I was the living embodiment of this investment. I took doctors out to so many fancy Manhattan restaurants that the maitre d’s greeted me by name. The company hosted them at catered “speaking programs” and gave away tickets to baseball games and Broadway musicals. We even sent doctors and their families to sponsored academic conferences at tony resorts in Florida and California. During the day, if doctors didn’t have time to see me, I chatted up their receptionists, plying them with food and gifts (stress balls, umbrellas, clocks) and asking, breezily, which medications their bosses preferred prescribing, and why.

Nowadays, it’s not all fine wine and caviar. Since I left the industry in 2000, pharmaceutical marketing has changed — at least on the outside. After years of bad press, and with mounting fears of a regulatory crackdown, drugmakers adopted a voluntary code of conduct in 2009 that, among other restrictions, permits only “modest, occasional meals” in “appropriate circumstances,” facilitating “the exchange of medical and scientific information.” Though this curbed the most ridiculous excesses — no more “unrestricted grants” and way fewer free pens — research shows that even a $20 lunch can sway prescribing behavior. The fundamentals of the business remain the same: A good sales rep builds credibility with doctors by using scientific-seeming language to push the product and makes them feel subtly obligated to write more scrips.
pharmalot  medicine 
13 days ago by danwin
Wining and dining aside, it's all about building trust with doctors
health  business  perspective 
13 days ago by noiseguy