The Making of a YouTube Radical - The New York Times


62 bookmarks. First posted by yudha87 7 days ago.


Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism. June 09, 2019 at 08:22PM
2 hours ago by colin.eide
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
3 days ago by mathewi
Over years of reporting on internet culture, I’ve heard countless versions of Mr. Cain’s story: an aimless young man — usually white, frequently interested in video games — visits YouTube looking for direction or distraction and is seduced by a community of far-right creators. But critics and independent researchers say YouTube has inadvertently created a dangerous on-ramp to extremism by combining two things: a business model that rewards provocative videos with exposure and advertising dollars, and an algorithm that guides users down personalized paths meant to keep them glued to their screens. In March, after a white nationalist gunman killed 50 Muslims in a pair of mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, Mr. Molyneux and Ms. Southern distanced themselves from the violence, calling the killer a left-wing “eco-terrorist” and saying that linking the shooting to far-right speech was “utter insanity.” “Enjoyment of Beethoven or white babies or whatever you get off to is in no way impeded by the proximity of people with different skin colors.” Decrypting the Alt-Right: How to Recognize a F@scist — ContraPoints Mr. Cain says Natalie Wynn, a former academic philosopher who makes left-wing YouTube videos, used humor, shot in a style not unlike right-wing creators, to get his attention. This group calls itself BreadTube, a reference to the left-wing anarchist Peter Kropotkin’s 1892 book, “The Conquest of Bread.” It also includes people like Oliver Thorn, a British philosopher who hos
3 days ago by sechilds
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
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4 days ago by Devje
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube, where he was pulled into a world filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism.
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4 days ago by incredimike
Quite good read. "The Making of a YouTube Radical"
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4 days ago by tguemes
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
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4 days ago by rolphrecto
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube, where he was pulled into a world filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism.
4 days ago by rawland
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
4 days ago by robw
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
4 days ago by davejavou
The medium is the message.
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5 days ago by kohlmannj
The medium is the message.
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5 days ago by dalcrose
Mr. Cain, 26, recently swore off the alt-right nearly five years after discovering it, and has become a vocal critic of the movement. He is scarred by his experience of being radicalized by what he calls a “decentralized cult” of far-right YouTube personalities, who convinced him that Western civilization was under threat from Muslim immigrants and cultural Marxists, that innate I.Q. differences explained racial disparities, and that feminism was a dangerous ideology.
politics  youtube  article  opinion 
5 days ago by danesparza
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism. via Pocket
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5 days ago by kubia
Near the end of our interview, I told Mr. Cain that I found it odd that he had successfully climbed out of a right-wing YouTube rabbit hole, only to jump into a left-wing YouTube rabbit hole. I asked if he had considered cutting back on his video intake altogether, and rebuild some of his offline relationships.

He hesitated, and looked slightly confused. For all of its problems, he said, YouTube is still where political battles are fought and won. Leaving the platform would essentially mean abandoning the debate.

He conceded, though, that he needed to think critically about the videos he watched.

“YouTube is the place to put out a message,” he said. “But I’ve learned now that you can’t go to YouTube and think that you’re getting some kind of education, because you’re not.”
youtube  politics  nytimes  racism  right-wing  dystopia 
5 days ago by jm
The medium is the message.
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5 days ago by brittanyforks
"YouTube has been a godsend for hyper-partisans on all sides. It has allowed them to bypass traditional gatekeepers and broadcast their views to mainstream audiences, and has helped once-obscure commentators build lucrative media businesses.

"It has also been a useful recruiting tool for far-right extremist groups. Bellingcat, an investigative news site, analyzed messages from far-right chat rooms and found that YouTube was cited as the most frequent cause of members’ “red-pilling” — an internet slang term for converting to far-right beliefs. A European research group, VOX-Pol, conducted a separate analysis of nearly 30,000 Twitter accounts affiliated with the alt-right. It found that the accounts linked to YouTube more often than to any other site."
mind  violence  politics  watching  internet 
5 days ago by ingenu
"Breadtube." Near the end of this, there is some interesting stuff.
from twitter
5 days ago by macloo
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism. via Pocket
pocket 
6 days ago by jburkunk
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube, where he was pulled into a world filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism.
from:IFTTT  from:flipboard 
6 days ago by curiousstranger
It seems like this guy was primed to come back from all this, but you can see clearly how a "neutral" algorithm can pull angry and frustrated young men into hate.
algorithms  whitesupremacy  nyt  youtube  conservatism  longreads 
6 days ago by UltraNurd
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
6 days ago by kerim
This is a pretty incredible, detailed walk-through of how following a series of videos on YouTube changed this individuals outlook. So much of this content is not visible to most people.

> Perhaps this shouldn’t be a surprise. Our political culture is now built largely on shapeshifting internet platforms, which have made flipping partisan allegiances as easy as changing hairstyles. It’s possible that vulnerable young men like Mr. Cain will drift away from radical groups as they grow up and find stability elsewhere. It’s also possible that this kind of whiplash polarization is here to stay as political factions gain and lose traction online.

I honestly tend to avoid YouTube. I've found the whole platform to be a bit of a mess.
6 days ago by thingles
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube, where he was pulled into a world filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism.
Few of them had overt ties to establishment conservative groups, and there was little talk about tax cuts or trade policy on their channels. Instead, they rallied around issues like free speech and antifeminism, portraying themselves as truth-telling rebels doing battle against humorless “social justice warri...
fakenews  youtube  moderation  toread  BreadTube  good  important  onlinecommunities  research  ideas 
6 days ago by gruger
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
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6 days ago by skinnyj
This is terrifying- how the recommendation algorithm in Youtube leads to radicalization into the alt-right agenda:
from twitter_favs
6 days ago by girma
TheStacksCat Daily: The Making of a YouTube Radical , see more
VR  AR  AI  MR  SL  from twitter
6 days ago by LibrariesVal
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
6 days ago by mikerugnetta
Les denne her. Bare les.
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6 days ago by aslakr
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
6 days ago by drewcaldwell
Favorite tweet:

Today on A1: the story that has ruined my mentions for 24 hours and my YouTube recommendations for much longer than that. Very proud to work at a place that takes internet culture this seriously. https://t.co/7UojMUuwWR pic.twitter.com/UY8FPG3Cmz

— Kevin Roose (@kevinroose) June 9, 2019
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6 days ago by chetan
IQ debates are a gateway drug.
s 
6 days ago by jgordon
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
6 days ago by sethde
. is radicalising young men, and the first step is usually anti-feminism.
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6 days ago by danbri
The Making of a YouTube Radical via Instapaper https://nyti.ms/2Wwtsnz
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6 days ago by chaoxian
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
7 days ago by k2theiely
Favorite tweet: kevinroose

I’ve been working on a story for a few months that I’m excited to share.

It’s about a 21-year-old guy who was radicalized into the far-right, with help from his YouTube recommendations. https://t.co/7UojMUuwWR

— Kevin Roose (@kevinroose) June 8, 2019

http://twitter.com/kevinroose/status/1137372560113274881
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7 days ago by tswaterman
The Making of a YouTube Radical by via https://nyti.ms/2Wwtsnz
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7 days ago by acdha
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled with conspiracy theories, misogyny and racism.
Archive  ifttt  nyt  op-ed  opinion 
7 days ago by odelano
The formatting of this article is amazing. The piece, itself, even better.
from twitter_favs
7 days ago by tweetotaler
critics and independent researchers say YouTube has inadvertently created a dangerous on-ramp to extremism by combining two things: a business model that rewards provocative videos with exposure and advertising dollars, and an algorithm that guides users down personalized paths meant to keep them glued to their screens.
YouTube  algorithms  extremism  tech&society 
7 days ago by barbarafister
Caleb Cain was a college dropout looking for direction. He turned to YouTube. Soon, he was pulled into a far-right universe, watching thousands of videos filled…
from instapaper
7 days ago by yudha87