Is everything you think you know about depression wrong? | Society | The Guardian


79 bookmarks. First posted by cote 14 days ago.


In this extract from his new book, Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 14 years, calls for a new approach
5 hours ago by laochenstudent
To find the answers, I ended up going on a 40,000-mile journey across the world and back. I talked to the leading social scientists investigating these questions, and to people who have been overcoming depression in unexpected ways – from an Amish village in Indiana, to a Brazilian city that banned advertising and a laboratory in Baltimore conducting a startling wave of experiments. From these people, I learned the best scientific evidence about what really causes depression and anxiety. They taught me that it is not what we have been told it is up to now. I found there is evidence that seven specific factors in the way we are living today are causing depression and anxiety to rise – alongside two real biological factors (such as your genes) that can combine with these forces to make it worse.
depression  anxiety  psychology 
7 hours ago by craniac
"Around one in five US adults are taking at least one drug for a psychiatric problem"
from twitter
3 days ago by TaylorPearson
Deep research on human needs unmet --> covered these last generations by medication vs. life change (or social change)
depression  health  anxiety 
3 days ago by emmacarlson
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  health 
5 days ago by letphilsing55
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
7 days ago by dubo
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive.
8 days ago by mayrav
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  health  psychology 
9 days ago by christos
If you are depressed and anxious, you are not a machine with malfunctioning parts. You are a human being with unmet needs. The only real way out of our epidemic of despair is for all of us, together, to begin to meet those human needs – for deep connection, to the things that really matter in life
misc 
10 days ago by zephyr777
When I interviewed social scientists all over the world – from São Paulo to Sydney, from Los Angeles to London – I started to see an unexpected picture emerge. We all know that every human being has basic physical needs: for food, for water, for shelter, for clean air. It turns out that, in the same way, all humans have certain basic psychological needs. We need to feel we belong. We need to feel valued. We need to feel we’re good at something. We need to feel we have a secure future. And there is growing evidence that our culture isn’t meeting those psychological needs for many – perhaps most – people.
depression  psychology 
10 days ago by whip_lash
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 days ago by joostw
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive.
getpocket 
10 days ago by linkt
If you are depressed and anxious, you are not a machine with malfunctioning parts. You are a human being with unmet needs. The only real way out of our epidemic of despair is for all of us, together, to begin to meet those human needs – for deep connection, to the things that really matter in life.
depression  guardian  lisarosa 
11 days ago by Cervus
‘between 2011 and 2012, the polling company Gallup conducted the most detailed study ever carried out of how people feel about the thing we spend most of our waking lives doing – our paid work. They found that 13% of people say they are “engaged” in their work – they find it meaningful and look forward to it. Some 63% say they are “not engaged”, which is defined as “sleepwalking through their workday”. And 24% are “actively disengaged”: they hate it.’

More:

‘To them, finding an antidepressant didn’t mean finding a way to change your brain chemistry. It meant finding a way to solve the problem that was causing the depression in the first place.’
depression 
11 days ago by spdaly
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  digg 
11 days ago by michaelkpate
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  digg 
11 days ago by cthorpe
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive.
digg  ifttt 
11 days ago by Goldmanjordan
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
pocket  digg  trending 
11 days ago by jburkunk
When I interviewed social scientists all over the world – from São Paulo to Sydney, from Los Angeles to London – I started to see an unexpected picture emerge. We all know that every human being has basic physical needs: for food, for water, for shelter, for clean air. It turns out that, in the same way, all humans have certain basic psychological needs. We need to feel we belong. We need to feel valued. We need to feel we’re good at something. We need to feel we have a secure future. And there is growing evidence that our culture isn’t meeting those psychological needs for many – perhaps most – people. I kept learning that, in very different ways, we have become disconnected from things we really need, and this deep disconnection is driving this epidemic of depression and anxiety all around us.
psychology  depression  books 
12 days ago by atbradley
It turns out if you have no control over your work, you are far more likely to become stressed – and, crucially, depressed. Humans have an innate need to feel that what we are doing, day-to-day, is meaningful. When you are controlled, you can’t create meaning out of your work. In its official statement for World Health Day in 2017, the United Nations reviewed the best evidence and concluded that “the dominant biomedical narrative of depression” is based on “biased and selective use of research outcomes” that “must be abandoned”. We need to move from “focusing on ‘chemical imbalances’”, they said, to focusing more on “power imbalances”.
depression  anxiety 
12 days ago by patrickandrews
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
12 days ago by drewcaldwell
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive.
$wellbeing 
12 days ago by lividhedgehog
excellent beginner article about medical trial publishing, role of late stage capitalism in mental health
psychology  depression  anxiety  mentalhealth  scicomms  book 
12 days ago by sauramaia
Modern thinking on depression. Not chemical imbalances.
psychology  medicine  drugs  pharmaceuticals 
12 days ago by traggett
‘between 2011 and 2012, the polling company Gallup conducted the most detailed study ever carried out of how people feel about the thing we spend most of our waking lives doing – our paid work. They found that 13% of people say they are “engaged” in their work – they find it meaningful and look forward to it. Some 63% say they are “not engaged”, which is defined as “sleepwalking through their workday”. And 24% are “actively disengaged”: they hate it.’

More:

‘To them, finding an antidepressant didn’t mean finding a way to change your brain chemistry. It meant finding a way to solve the problem that was causing the depression in the first place.’
calibre-recipe 
12 days ago by personalnadir
‘Drugs are having a positive effect for some people – but they clearly can’t be the main solution for the majority of us.’Photograph: Alamy I n the 1970s, a…
13 days ago by jkleske
In this extract from his new book, Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 14 years, calls for a new approach
depression  @instapaper  the-guardian 
13 days ago by lendamico
via Pinboard (popular bookmarks) http://ift.tt/1bAtZq3
saved.feedly 
13 days ago by sbutts
Ultimately, drugs aren’t going to make you happy if you’re surrounded by miserable circumstances:
depression  from twitter
13 days ago by hopeless
Is everything you think you know about depression wrong? http://bit.ly/2D94nln
IFTTT  Buffer 
13 days ago by serkef
My life depresses me more than my brain:
from twitter
13 days ago by topgold
The writing is tedious and repetitive in this excerpt.
While I'm excited for the subject matter, I'd be thrilled with seeing a better edit.
depression  books  pharmacology 
13 days ago by po
all humans have certain basic psychological needs. We need to feel we belong. We need to feel valued. We need to feel we’re good at something. We need to feel we have a secure future.
psychology  depression 
13 days ago by neomindryan
This pain you are feeling is not a pathology. It’s not crazy. It is a signal that your natural psychological needs are not being met. It is a form of grief – for yourself, and for the culture you live in going so wrong
depression  anxiety 
13 days ago by omnipotus
In this extract from his new book, Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 14 years, calls for a new approach
book 
13 days ago by phutwo
In the 1970s, a truth was accidentally discovered about depression – one that was quickly swept aside, because its implications were too inconvenient, and too explosive. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
14 days ago by domingogallardo
"It turns out that between 65 and 80% of people on antidepressants are depressed again within a year. I had thought that I was freakish for remaining depressed while on these drugs. In fact, Kirsch explained to me in Massachusetts, I was totally typical. These drugs are having a positive effect for some people – but they clearly can’t be the main solution for the majority of us, because we’re still depressed even when we take them. At the moment, we offer depressed people a menu with only one option on it. I certainly don’t want to take anything off the menu – but I realised, as I spent time with him, that we would have to expand the menu.

This led Professor Kirsch to ask a more basic question, one he was surprised to be asking. How do we know depression is even caused by low serotonin at all? When he began to dig, it turned out that the evidence was strikingly shaky. Professor Andrew Scull of Princeton, writing in the Lancet, explained that attributing depression to spontaneously low serotonin is “deeply misleading and unscientific”. Dr David Healy told me: “There was never any basis for it, ever. It was just marketing copy.”

...

In its official statement for World Health Day in 2017, the United Nations reviewed the best evidence and concluded that “the dominant biomedical narrative of depression” is based on “biased and selective use of research outcomes” that “must be abandoned”. We need to move from “focusing on ‘chemical imbalances’”, they said, to focusing more on “power imbalances”.

After I learned all this, and what it means for us all, I started to long for the power to go back in time and speak to my teenage self on the day he was told a story about his depression that was going to send him off in the wrong direction for so many years. I wanted to tell him: “This pain you are feeling is not a pathology. It’s not crazy. It is a signal that your natural psychological needs are not being met. It is a form of grief – for yourself, and for the culture you live in going so wrong. I know how much it hurts. I know how deeply it cuts you. But you need to listen to this signal. We all need to listen to the people around us sending out this signal. It is telling you what is going wrong. It is telling you that you need to be connected in so many deep and stirring ways that you aren’t yet – but you can be, one day.”

If you are depressed and anxious, you are not a machine with malfunctioning parts. You are a human being with unmet needs. The only real way out of our epidemic of despair is for all of us, together, to begin to meet those human needs – for deep connection, to the things that really matter in life."
depression  work  life  power  control  people  mental  health  drugs  marketing  big-businesses-are-screwing-you-over 
14 days ago by ssam
f you are depressed and anxious, you are not a machine with malfunctioning parts. You are a human being with unmet needs.
essay/article  health  depression 
14 days ago by alegria
Cooperatives - the antidote to depression and anomie that we all experience under capitalism
from twitter_favs
14 days ago by pixplz
Cooperatives - the antidote to depression and anomie that we all experience under capitalism https://t.co/BfGdqbVy6D
– Yvonne Yen Liu (yvonnegraphy) http://twitter.com/yvonnegraphy/status/950055359326007297
via:packrati.us 
14 days ago by kelo
‘between 2011 and 2012, the polling company Gallup conducted the most detailed study ever carried out of how people feel about the thing we spend most of our waking lives doing – our paid work. They found that 13% of people say they are “engaged” in their work – they find it meaningful and look forward to it. Some 63% say they are “not engaged”, which is defined as “sleepwalking through their workday”. And 24% are “actively disengaged”: they hate it.’

More:

‘To them, finding an antidepressant didn’t mean finding a way to change your brain chemistry. It meant finding a way to solve the problem that was causing the depression in the first place.’
depression  work  books  surveys  psycology 
14 days ago by cote