Untitled (https://0.30000000000000004.com/)


50 bookmarks. First posted by mootcycle october 2017.


0.30000000000000004
from twitter_favs
2 days ago by mybeky
Your language isn't broken, it's doing floating point math. Computers can only natively store integers, so they need some way of representing decimal numbers. This representation comes with
programming 
2 days ago by bjcubsfan
Handy web page that explains the issue of floating point numbers, as it relates to different programming languages.
programming 
2 days ago by davep
RT : oh wow, this should have been obvious but shows how much living in a binary world can be unpredictable >
from twitter
3 days ago by noii
how is this real how did this happen what did you do enom what did you do there are no letters there are no words
math 
3 days ago by yizhexu
0.30000000000000004
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3 days ago by joseph
Your language isn't broken, it's doing floating point math. Computers can only natively store integers, so they need some way of representing decimal numbers. This representation comes with some degree of inaccuracy. That's why, more often than not, .1 + .2 != .3.

Why does this happen?
It's actually rather interesting. When you have a base 10 system (like ours), it can only express fractions that use a prime factor of the base. The prime factors of 10 are 2 and 5. So 1/2, 1/4, 1/5, 1/8, and 1/10 can all be expressed cleanly because the denominators all use prime factors of 10. In contrast, 1/3, 1/6, and 1/7 are all repeating decimals because their denominators use a prime factor of 3 or 7. In binary (or base 2), the only prime factor is 2. So you can only express fractions cleanly which only contain 2 as a prime factor. In binary, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 would all be expressed cleanly as decimals. While, 1/5 or 1/10 would be repeating decimals. So 0.1 and 0.2 (1/10 and 1/5) while clean decimals in a base 10 system, are repeating decimals in the base 2 system the computer is operating in. When you do math on these repeating decimals, you end up with leftovers which carry over when you convert the computer's base 2 (binary) number into a more human readable base 10 number.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=21686264
math  binary 
3 days ago by danwin
Your language isn't broken, it's doing floating point math. Computers can only natively store integers, so they need some way of representing decimal numbers. This representation comes with some degree of inaccuracy. That's why, more often than not, .1 + .2 != .3.
programming  mathematics 
3 days ago by Chirael
Floating Point Math
from twitter
may 2019 by jackysee
RT : If anyone complains about JavaScript being weird, because 0.1 + 0.3 !== 0.4, send them to this website:
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may 2019 by amitkaps
RT : If anyone complains about JavaScript being weird, because 0.1 + 0.3 !== 0.4, send them to this website:
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may 2019 by rtanglao
Your language isn't broken, it's doing floating point math. Computers can only natively store integers, so they need some way of representing decimal numbers. This representation comes with some degree of inaccuracy. That's why, more often than not, .1 + .2 != .3.
mathematics  programming  error 
may 2019 by mark.larios
If anyone complains about JavaScript being weird, because 0.1 + 0.3 !== 0.4, send them to this website:
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may 2019 by matthewbeta
If anyone complains about JavaScript being weird, because 0.1 + 0.3 !== 0.4, send them to this website:
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may 2019 by akalin
If anyone complains about JavaScript being weird, because 0.1 + 0.3 !== 0.4, send them to this website:
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may 2019 by mehulkar
RT : how is this real how did this happen what did you do enom what did you do there are no letters there are no words
from twitter
october 2017 by mlp
how is this real how did this happen what did you do enom what did you do there are no letters there are no words
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october 2017 by mootcycle