How It Became Normal to Ignore Texts and Emails - The Atlantic


25 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 january 2018.


Digital messages mimic the speed of real conversation, but often what people like best is the ability to put them off. The defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
march 2018 by kkahnharris
How It Became Normal to Ignore Texts and Emails
from twitter
february 2018 by suzanbond
Why do you have to be so damn loud?!
from twitter
february 2018 by DocDre
anxiety is the price of convenience
problemswithtechnology  forstudents 
january 2018 by davidleitner
The defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. In person, or on the phone, those responses…
from instapaper
january 2018 by larsmensel
the things that people said they liked most about their phones were often related to control. One American woman said her favorite thing was “Constant communication when I want it (can also shut it off when I don’t).”
摘抄 
january 2018 by ddiiiik
איך התעלמות (או הדחקה) ממיילים והודעות טקסט הפכה לנורמטיבית - ולמה זה עדיין עדיף משיחות טלפון
newsletter:53-09-17  read:all  read:en 
january 2018 by alexpo
Modern communication is really complicated
from twitter
january 2018 by e_j
How It Became Normal to Ignore Texts and Emails
from twitter
january 2018 by karsh
Digital messages mimic the speed of real conversation, but often what people like best is the ability to put them off. The defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  feedly 
january 2018 by schmitz
The defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. In person, or on the phone, those responses…
from instapaper
january 2018 by kohlmannj
The defining feature of conversation is the expectation of a response. It would just be a monologue without one. In person, or on the phone, those responses…
email  from instapaper
january 2018 by rboone
The result is the sense that everyone could get back to you immediately, if they wanted to—and the anxiety that follows when they don’t. But the paradox of this age of communication is that this anxiety is the price of convenience. People are happy to make the trade to gain the ability to respond whenever they feel like it.
technology 
january 2018 by cipherpolice
But what’s different now, she says, is that “media that are in principle asynchronous increasingly function as if they are synchronous.”
communication  technology  society 
january 2018 by jeremybeasley