Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem | Quanta Magazine


37 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy 9 weeks ago.


Quantum computation researchers are excited not just about what Mahadev’s protocol achieves, but also about the radically new approach she has brought to bear on the problem. Using classical cryptography in the quantum realm is a “truly novel idea,” Vidick wrote. “I expect many more results to continue building on these ideas.”Now, after eight years of graduate school, Mahadev has succeeded. She has come up with an interactive protocol by which users with no quantum powers of their own can nevertheless employ cryptography to put a harness on a quantum computer and drive it wherever they want, with the certainty that the quantum computer is following their orders. Mahadev’s approach, Vazirani said, gives the user “leverage that the computer just can’t shake off.”...

Quantum computation researchers are excited not just about what Mahadev’s protocol achieves, but also about the radically new approach she has brought to bear on the problem. Using classical cryptography in the quantum realm is a “truly novel idea,” Vidick wrote. “I expect many more results to continue building on these ideas.”
quantumComputing  computing  cryptography  algorithms 
7 weeks ago by jamesmnw
quantum computing Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem By Erica Klarreich October 8, 2018 Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school…
from instapaper
7 weeks ago by Zyber17
Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation: How do you know whether a quantum computer has done anything quantum at all?
articles  quantum_computing 
8 weeks ago by gmisra
Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem | Quanta Magazine
quantum-computing  from twitter
8 weeks ago by cierniak
Urmila Mahadev, a UC Berkeley grad student, solves the fundamental problem of finding a protocol by which a classical computer can verify a quantum computation
8 weeks ago by joeo10
In the spring of 2017, Urmila Mahadev found herself in what most graduate students would consider a pretty sweet position. She had just solved a major problem…
from instapaper
8 weeks ago by toph
Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation.
quantum  crypto  computer 
9 weeks ago by cito
quantum computing Graduate Student Solves Quantum Verification Problem By Erica Klarreich October 8, 2018 Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by nsfmc
Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation: How do you know whether a quantum computer has done anything quantum at all?
computing  cryptography  quantum  Verification 
9 weeks ago by gdw
Comp-Sci is hard for girls.
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by alpinegizmo
Now, after eight years of graduate school, Mahadev has succeeded. She has come up with an interactive protocol by which users with no quantum powers of their own can nevertheless employ cryptography to put a harness on a quantum computer and drive it wherever they want, with the certainty that the quantum computer is following their orders. Mahadev’s approach, Vazirani said, gives the user “leverage that the computer just can’t shake off.”


Honestly a lot of the explanation is beyond me, but sounds very cool.
quantum  computing  cryptography  mathematics 
9 weeks ago by madamim
If a quantum computer is computing something that is not computable on an ordinary computer, can you check that the result is correct? A recent breakthrough by Urmila Mahadev says: yes, you can! https://t.co/IrOwEsFYvw via @QuantaMagazine http://twitter.com/AAmbainis/status/1049937210521382917
twitter  twitter-like 
9 weeks ago by konstruktors
In 2016, while working on a different problem, Mahadev and Vazirani made an advance that would later prove crucial. In collaboration with Paul Christiano, a computer scientist now at OpenAI, a company in San Francisco, they developed a way to use cryptography to get a quantum computer to build what we’ll call a “secret state” — one whose description is known to the classical verifier, but not to the quantum computer itself. ...

In 2017, Mahadev figured out how to build the trapdoor functions at the core of the secret-state method by using a type of cryptography called Learning With Errors (LWE). Using these trapdoor functions, she was able to create a quantum version of “blind” computation, by which cloud-computing users can mask their data so the cloud computer can’t read it, even while it is computing on it. And shortly after that, Mahadev, Vazirani and Christiano teamed up with Vidick and Zvika Brakerski (of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel) to refine these trapdoor functions still further, using the secret-state method to develop a foolproof way for a quantum computer to generate provably random numbers.
Quantum-computing  Urmila-Mahadev 
9 weeks ago by quant18
Quantum Verification Problem solved (if you assume Learning with Errors is quantum hard)
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by ciphpercoder
In the spring of 2017, Urmila Mahadev found herself in what most graduate students would consider a pretty sweet position. She had just solved a major problem in quantum computation, the study of computers that derive their power from the strange laws of quantum physics. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  computing  cryptography  quantum  security 
9 weeks ago by ChristopherA
Urmila Mahadev spent eight years in graduate school solving one of the most basic questions in quantum computation: How do you know whether a quantum computer
protocols  verification  quantum_computing  physics 
9 weeks ago by jbkcc