Making China Great Again | The New Yorker


57 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 january 2018.


When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. Within two weeks, however, “Wolf Warrior II” had become the highest-grossing Chinese movie of all time. via Pocket
Pocket 
march 2018 by tonyhue
Osnos on China. Are the US, China, Russia all trying to do the same thing? Looking back at being great powers rather than looking to what could be?
china  politics  government  US 
january 2018 by traggett
As Donald Trump surrenders America’s global commitments, Xi Jinping is learning to pick up the pieces.
january 2018 by petulantskeptic
Making China Great Again via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2C5A1in
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january 2018 by lavallee
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. via Pocket
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january 2018 by domingogallardo
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers Audio:…
instapaper 
january 2018 by theluther
Evan Osnos has a big analysis of how Trump's reluctance, or inability, to engage with CHina's growing desire to influence the world is giving Xi the long-sought chance to move into driving seat. Here he looks at how a recumbent US leaves gaps for aggressive moves in technology:
<p>In Beijing, I hailed a cab and headed to the northwest corner of the city, where a Chinese company called SenseTime is working on facial recognition, a field at the intersection of science and individual rights. The company was founded in 2014 by Tang Xiao’ou, a computer scientist who trained at M.I.T. and returned to Hong Kong to teach. (For years, China’s startups lagged behind those in Silicon Valley. But there is more parity now. Of the forty-one private companies worldwide that reached “unicorn” status in 2017—meaning they had valuations of a billion dollars or more—fifteen are Chinese and seventeen are American.)

SenseTime’s offices have a sleek, industrial look. Nobody wears an identification badge, because cameras recognize employees, causing doors to open. I was met there by June Jin, the chief marketing officer, who earned an M.B.A. at the University of Chicago and worked at Microsoft, Apple, and Tesla. Jin walked me over to a display of lighthearted commercial uses of facial-recognition technology. I stepped before a machine, which resembled a slender A.T.M., that assessed my “happiness” and other attributes, guessed that I am a thirty-three-year-old male, and, based on that information, played me an advertisement for skateboarding attire. When I stepped in front of it again, it revised its calculation to forty-one years old, and played me an ad for liquor. (I was, at the time, forty.) The machines are used in restaurants to entertain waiting guests. But they contain a hidden element of artificial intelligence as well: images are collected and compared with a facial database of V.I.P. customers. “A waiter or waitress comes up and maybe we get you a seat,” Jin said. “That’s the beauty of A.I.”

Next, Jin showed me how the technology is used by police. She said, “We work very closely with the Public Security Bureau,” which applies SenseTime’s algorithms to millions of photo I.D.s. As a demonstration, using the company’s employee database, a video screen displayed a live feed of a busy intersection nearby. “In real time, it captures all the attributes of the cars and pedestrians,” she said. On an adjoining screen, a Pac-Man-like trail indicated a young man’s movements around the city, based only on his face. Jin said, “It can match a suspect with a criminal database. If the similarity level is over a certain threshold, then they can make an arrest on the spot.” </p>
china  politics 
january 2018 by charlesarthur
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. via Pocket
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january 2018 by Pheelmore
It seems Donald Trump’s view is: if China can take a free ride, why can’t we? But the problem is that the U.S. is too big. If you ride for free, then the bus will collapse
politics  china  russia  trump  brexit  to_blog 
january 2018 by yorksranter
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers Audio:…
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january 2018 by elivz
Making China Great Again
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january 2018 by ciocci
Long and interesting piece about recent China - Making China Great Again
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january 2018 by puja
Making China Great Again via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2C5A1in
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january 2018 by craniac
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
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january 2018 by johnrclark
Favorite tweet:

Very interesting piece in the New Yorker on China's rising nationalism and muscle-flexing as it tries to fill the power vacuum created by the…
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january 2018 by lou31
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
from instapaper
january 2018 by joostvanderborg
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions.
january 2018 by AnthonyBaker
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. via Pocket
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january 2018 by drewcaldwell
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers Audio:…
from instapaper
january 2018 by mojacc
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers Audio:…
from instapaper
january 2018 by hustwj
Trump’s follies making America Weak Again:

“Emerging in its place is a cynical, zero-sum politics, a return to blood and soil, which privileges interests above inspiration.”
january 2018 by cliffix
Until recently, Chinese nationalists were crowded out by a widespread desire to be embraced by the outside world. They see the parallel ascents of Xi and Trump as cause for celebration, and accuse “white lotuses,” their term for Chinese liberals, of sanctimony and intolerance. They reject political correctness in issues of race and worry about Islamic extremism. (Muslims, though they make up less than two per cent of China’s population, are the objects of fevered animosity on its Internet.) Last June, Yao Chen, one of China’s most popular actresses, received a barrage of criticism online after she tried to raise awareness of the global refugee crisis. (She was forced to clarify that she was not calling for China to accept refugees.)

Back in 2008, I met a jittery young conservative named Rao Jin, a contrarian on the fringes of Chinese politics. Long before Trump launched his campaign or railed against the media, Rao created a Web site called Anti-CNN.com, which was dedicated to criticizing Western news coverage. Over lunch in Beijing recently, he exuded calm vindication. “Things that we used to push are now mainstream,” not only in China but globally, he said. In Rao’s view, Trump’s “America First” slogan is an honest declaration, a realist vision stripped of false altruism and piety. “From his perspective, America’s interests come first,” Rao said. “To Chinese people, this is a big truth, and you can’t deny it.” Rao has watched versions of his ideas gain strength in Russia, France, Great Britain, and the United States. “In this world, power speaks,” he said, making a fist, a gesture that Trump adopted in his Inauguration speech and Xi displayed in a photo taken at the start of his new term.
china 
january 2018 by zryb
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
from instapaper
january 2018 by yudha87
Evan Osnos looks at the US-China relationship under Trump. There are too many good sections to quote here, the whole thing is worth a read. Can the US, China and Russia all become great again at the same time?

Under the banner of “America First,” President Trump is reducing U.S. commitments abroad. On his third day in office, he withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a twelve-nation trade deal designed by the United States as a counterweight to a rising China. To allies in Asia, the withdrawal damaged America’s credibility. “You won’t be able to see that overnight,” Lee Hsien Loong, the Prime Minister of Singapore, told me, at an event in Washington. “It’s like when you draw a red line and then you don’t take it seriously. Was there pain? You didn’t see it, but I’m quite sure there’s an impact.”

In a speech to Communist Party officials last January 20th, Major General Jin Yinan, a strategist at China’s National Defense University, celebrated America’s pullout from the trade deal. “We are quiet about it,” he said. “We repeatedly state that Trump ‘harms China.’ We want to keep it that way. In fact, he has given China a huge gift. That is the American withdrawal from T.P.P.” Jin, whose remarks later circulated, told his audience, “As the U.S. retreats globally, China shows up.”..

For Chinese leaders, Yan [Xuetong] said, “Trump is the biggest strategic opportunity.” I asked Yan how long he thought the opportunity would last. “As long as Trump stays in power,” he replied...

After the [Mar-a-Lago} summit, the Pangoal Institution, a Beijing think tank, published an analysis of the Trump Administration, describing it as a den of warring “cliques,” the most influential of which was the “Trump family clan.” The Trump clan appears to “directly influence final decisions” on business and diplomacy in a way that “has rarely been seen in the political history of the United States,” the analyst wrote. He summed it up using an obscure phrase from feudal China: jiatianxia 家天下 —“to treat the state as your possession.”
ee 
january 2018 by bbishop
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
from instapaper
january 2018 by kohlmannj
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
from instapaper
january 2018 by cspathis
“It seems Donald Trump’s view is: if China can take a free ride, why can’t we? But the problem is that the U.S. is too big. If you ride for free, then the bus will collapse. Maybe the best solution is for China to help the U.S. drive the bus. The worse scenario is that China drives the bus when it’s not ready. It’s too costly and it doesn’t have enough experience.” Jia, who has a wry smile and a thick head of graying hair, said that universities have not had enough time to train scholars in areas that China is now expected to navigate: “In the past, the outside world was very far away. Now it’s very close. But the change happened too fast to digest.”

Menon continued, “I think we’re going back to actually the historic norm, separate multiverses, rather than one, which was an exception. If you go back to the concept of Europe in the nineteenth century, people basically lived in different worlds and had very controlled interactions with each other. China is not going to take responsibility for everything that happens in the Middle East or South America.” In small ways, Menon said, we live this way already. “Technology has made it easy, because iTunes keeps selling you more of the same music—it doesn’t keep exposing you to something new. When you go to Beijing, you still listen to your own music, and you’re actually in your own bubble. So it’s a historical aberration and a rarity, where you say you’re ‘globalized.’ But what does that mean?”
china  politics  diplomacy 
january 2018 by johndodds
When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. Within two weeks, however, “Wolf Warrior II” had become the highest-grossing Chinese movie of all time. via Pocket
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january 2018 by Werderbach
In an unfamiliar moment, China’s pursuit of a larger role in the world coincides with America’s pursuit of a smaller one. Illustration by Paul Rogers When the…
from instapaper
january 2018 by rothschi
When the Chinese action movie “Wolf Warrior II” arrived in theatres, in July, it looked like a standard shoot-’em-up, with a lonesome hero and frequent explosions. Within two weeks, however, “Wolf Warrior II” had become the highest-grossing Chinese movie of all time. via Pocket
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january 2018 by archizoo
Read. Every. Word. Making China Great Again by
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january 2018 by sriramv