The Tech Industry’s Gender-Discrimination Problem | The New Yorker


41 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 november 2017.


She told me that when she entered the industry, in the late nineteen-nineties, women were vastly outnumbered by men, but the atmosphere was not as aggressive or money-obsessed as it is today. She described many of the early investors and entrepreneurs as “dorks,” united by the fact that they “were all interested in technology.” The environment changed, she said, after the early venture-capital firms started investing in tech. “They happened to all be white guys who had graduated from the same handful of élite colleges,” she said. “And they tended to make investments in new firms started by people they knew, or by people who were like them.” This created a model of hiring and investing that some refer to as the “Gates, Bezos, Andreessen, or Google model,” which Melinda Gates recently characterized as, “white male nerds who’ve dropped out of Harvard or Stanford.” Little has improved over the years: two recent studies found that, in 2016, only seven per cent of the partners in venture-capital firms were women and just two per cent of venture-capital funding went to female founders.

Pao said that the change was reinforced by another event, in 2012: the initial public offering of Facebook, at well above a hundred billion dollars, which cemented Silicon Valley’s reputation as the place to make a quick fortune. Tech companies increasingly began competing with banks and hedge funds for the most ambitious college graduates. “Now you had the frat boys coming in, and that changed the culture,” Pao said. “It was just a different vibe. People were talking more about the cool things they had done than the products they were building.”

“All of the gains that have been made by the labor movement over the years are being slowly chipped away under this guise of ‘We’re in hip Northern California, and everything we do is so cool.’ ”

Earlier this year, the Department of Labor conducted an initial audit of Google’s pay practices, and found, according to court testimony in April, “systemic compensation disparities against women pretty much across the entire workforce,” showing, one official has said, six to seven standard deviations between pay for men and women in nearly every job category.
feminism  discrimination  sexism  tech  racism 
10 weeks ago by mike
The dramatic imbalance in pay and power has created the conditions for abuse. More and more, women are pushing for change.
technology  gender  discrimination  feminism  work  salary 
december 2017 by soobrosa
In print - this month’s New Yorker featuring and me :) full article at , photo b…
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november 2017 by hypatia
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by akrabat
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november 2017 by driptray
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november 2017 by mud
More and more women are working to solve the tech industry's gender discrimination problem: …
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november 2017 by dalcrose
The dramatic imbalance in pay and power has created the conditions for abuse. More and more, women are pushing for change.
feminism  gender  equality  tech  siliconvalley 
november 2017 by SimonHurtz
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone.
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november 2017 by dvand5
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by trieloff
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by bkerr
RT : Every CEO can commit now to review their pay scales to pay men and women equally for equal work.
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november 2017 by rtanglao
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by rolphrecto
Favorite tweet:

Brutal: "At one point, there were actually more men named Matt in the group than there were women." https://t.co/bOICg3kkv0

— Rafat Ali (@rafat) November 14, 2017
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november 2017 by chetan
RT : tech CEOs: does your company pass the Matt Test?
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november 2017 by tlafleur
Audio: Listen to this story. To hear more feature stories, download the Audm app for your iPhone. via Pocket
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november 2017 by drewcaldwell
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by rubywhite
RT : Every CEO can commit now to review their pay scales to pay men and women equally for equal work.
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november 2017 by Fallingbadgers
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by AramZS
The Tech Industry’s Gender-Discrimination Problem
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november 2017 by Reneelloyd
"At Tesla, as at many tech companies, gallows humor prevailed among some of the women. There was a sense that the male executives had little understanding of the challenges women faced at the company. One former Tesla employee told me that women made up less than ten per cent of her working group; at one point, there were actually more men named Matt in the group than there were women. This became a source of rueful comedy. One male colleague quipped that they should change the sign reading 'Women’s Room' to 'Matt’s Room.’"
matt  gender  feminism  work  tesla  2017  newyorker 
november 2017 by handcoding
tech CEOs: does your company pass the Matt Test?
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november 2017 by marks
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini Audio: Listen…
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november 2017 by kohlmannj
Almost half the women who get tech jobs eventually leave the field, more than double the percentage of men who do so. Illustration by Anna Parini One day in…
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november 2017 by adrianhon