When Will Climate Change Make the Earth Too Hot For Humans?


313 bookmarks. First posted by jeremyisweary 14 days ago.


Plague, famine, heat no human can survive. This is not science fiction but what scientists, when they're not being cautious, fear could be our future.
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2 days ago by cbucher1
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here. Peering beyond scientific reticence. via Pocket
Pocket 
3 days ago by driptray
When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine.

Scary article, probably exaggerated
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4 days ago by railmeat
Plague, famine, heat no human can survive. What scientists, when they’re not being cautious, fear climate change could do to our future.
climate  earth  future 
4 days ago by geetarista
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here . I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond…
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4 days ago by dwuziu
“last year, a boy was killed and 20 others infected by anthrax released when retreating permafrost exposed the…
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5 days ago by tobym
important read and most read article.
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5 days ago by Kevmoss
Plague, famine, heat no human can survive. What scientists, when they’re not being cautious, fear climate change could do to our future.
climate  hyperobjects 
6 days ago by mediapathic
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here. Peering beyond scientific reticence. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
6 days ago by capitolmuckrakr
Plague, famine, heat no human can survive. What scientists, when they’re not being cautious, fear climate change could do to our future.
climate-change 
6 days ago by richlyon
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here. Peering beyond scientific reticence. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  facebook 
6 days ago by Werderbach
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here . I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond…
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7 days ago by nertzy
When Will the Planet Be Too Hot For Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine. via
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7 days ago by laustdeleuran
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here. Peering beyond scientific reticence.
climate  change  longreads  science 
7 days ago by fwhamm
To read an annotated version of this article, complete with interviews with scientists and links to further reading, click here. Peering beyond scientific reticence.
IFTTT  Pocket 
8 days ago by timothyarnold
RT : Sure, the piece is shrill. ("So much more dying is coming.") But talking about worst cases is useful.
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9 days ago by jrosenau
When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine. https://t.co/OuCAECReuj Difficult to read scenario. http://pic.twitter.com/sVUcM03qMr

— Will Richardson (@willrich45) July 14, 2017
IFTTT  Twitter  ToTag 
9 days ago by willrichardson
When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine. Difficult t…
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9 days ago by bowbrick
When Will the Planet Be Too Hot for Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine. via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2t3pzTy
rl 
9 days ago by isaacvv
Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreak — sooner than you think.
climate  future  longform 
9 days ago by SimonHurtz
Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 days ago by schmitz
Favorite tweet:

How bad could climate change get? Really, really bad, and really really fast. https://t.co/TkCHhngS59

— David Wallace-Wells (@dwallacewells) July 10, 2017
Twitter 
10 days ago by mcp
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
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10 days ago by flobosg
The murmuring mantra of global neoliberalism, which prevailed between the end of the Cold War and the onset of the Great Recession, is that economic growth would save us from anything and everything.
But in the aftermath of the 2008 crash, a growing number of historians studying what they call “fossil capitalism” have begun to suggest that the entire history of swift economic growth, which began somewhat suddenly in the 18th century, is not the result of innovation or trade or the dynamics of global capitalism but simply our discovery of fossil fuels and all their raw power — a onetime injection of new “value” into a system that had previously been characterized by global subsistence living. Before fossil fuels, nobody lived better than their parents or grandparents or ancestors from 500 years before, except in the immediate aftermath of a great plague like the Black Death, which allowed the lucky survivors to gobble up the resources liberated by mass graves. After we’ve burned all the fossil fuels, these scholars suggest, perhaps we will return to a “steady state” global economy. Of course, that onetime injection has a devastating long-term cost: climate change.
climate  economy  future 
10 days ago by dominomaster
But no matter how well-informed you are, you are surely not alarmed enough. Over the past decades, our culture has gone apocalyptic with zombie movies and Mad Max dystopias, perhaps the collective result of displaced climate anxiety, and yet when it comes to contemplating real-world warming dangers, we suffer from an incredible failure of imagination. The reasons for that are many: the timid language of scientific probabilities, which the climatologist James Hansen once called “scientific reticence” in a paper chastising scientists for editing their own observations so conscientiously that they failed to communicate how dire the threat really was; the fact that the country is dominated by a group of technocrats who believe any problem can be solved and an opposing culture that doesn’t even see warming as a problem worth addressing; the way that climate denialism has made scientists even more cautious in offering speculative warnings; the simple speed of change and, also, its slowness, such that we are only seeing effects now of warming from decades past; our uncertainty about uncertainty, which the climate writer Naomi Oreskes in particular has suggested stops us from preparing as though anything worse than a median outcome were even possible; the way we assume climate change will hit hardest elsewhere, not everywhere; the smallness (two degrees) and largeness (1.8 trillion tons) and abstractness (400 parts per million) of the numbers; the discomfort of considering a problem that is very difficult, if not impossible, to solve; the altogether incomprehensible scale of that problem, which amounts to the prospect of our own annihilation; simple fear. But aversion arising from fear is a form of denial, too.
...
Unless you are a teenager, you probably read in your high-school textbooks that these extinctions were the result of asteroids. In fact, all but the one that killed the dinosaurs were caused by climate change produced by greenhouse gas. The most notorious was 252 million years ago; it began when carbon warmed the planet by five degrees, accelerated when that warming triggered the release of methane in the Arctic, and ended with 97 percent of all life on Earth dead.
...
Several of the scientists I spoke with proposed global warming as the solution to Fermi’s famous paradox, which asks, If the universe is so big, then why haven’t we encountered any other intelligent life in it? The answer, they suggested, is that the natural life span of a civilization may be only several thousand years, and the life span of an industrial civilization perhaps only several hundred. In a universe that is many billions of years old, with star systems separated as much by time as by space, civilizations might emerge and develop and burn themselves up simply too fast to ever find one another.
climatechange  climate  science 
10 days ago by atbradley
RT : "So much more dying is coming." is superb on our failure to grasp the true danger of climate change.
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10 days ago by not_napoleon
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
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11 days ago by trs
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
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11 days ago by nerd_uprising
long & terrifying
climate  toread 
11 days ago by inrgbwetrust
that will now go to war with us for many centuries, perhaps until it destroys us. That is what Wallace Smith Broecker
climate  change  future  environment 
11 days ago by ruthtupe
Great quote: "The smallness and largeness and abstractness of the numbers"
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11 days ago by paulbradshaw
“The Uninhabitable Earth Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreak.”
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11 days ago by Gleonhard
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
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11 days ago by wjbr
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
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11 days ago by kfinlayson
"The Uninhabitable Earth"
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11 days ago by peterjblack
RT : How bad could climate change get? Really, really bad, and really really fast.
climatechange  globalwarming  future  history  2017  aw  from twitter_favs
11 days ago by WimLeers
Famine, economic collapse, a sun that cooks us: What climate change could wreak — sooner than you think.
nymag  climate  david  wallace-wells 
11 days ago by paunit
I. ‘Doomsday’ Peering beyond scientific reticence. It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of…
from instapaper
12 days ago by alphex