How brands secretly buy their way into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories | The Outline


54 bookmarks. First posted by briantrice 10 days ago.


In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs accepted the request, Satyam introduced himself as a marketer for technology startups. via Pocket
Pocket 
6 hours ago by LaptopHeaven
- this looks far more corrosive for the PR industry than Bell Pottinger
journalism  pr  ethics  totwitter 
3 days ago by renaissancechambara
People involved with the payoffs are extremely reluctant to discuss them, but four contributing writers to prominent publications including Mashable, Inc, Business Insider, and Entrepreneur told me they have personally accepted payments in exchange for weaving promotional references to brands into their work on those sites.
pr  advertising  marketing  journalism 
6 days ago by imaginaryfriend
An Outline investigation found that contributors to prominent publications have taken payments in exchange for positive coverage.
advertising  journalism 
6 days ago by geetarista
RT : not surprising given what's happened to freelance rates...
from twitter
7 days ago by mikebutcher
RT : if you don't pay your writers, someone else will
from twitter
8 days ago by gaelicWizard
One of them, a contributor to Fast Company and other outlets who asked not to be identified by name, described how he had inserted references to a well-known startup that offers email marketing software into multiple online articles, in Fast Company and elsewhere, on behalf of a marketing agency he declined to name. To make the references seem natural, he said, he often links to case studies and how-to guides published by the startup on its own site. Other times, he’ll just praise a certain aspect of the company’s business to support a point in an otherwise unrelated story.
celebrity  fail  advertising 
8 days ago by dancall
In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs…
from instapaper
8 days ago by michaelfox
Crappy sites like Forbes, HuffPo, and Fast Company have writers taking undisclosed money from advertisers
ads  deception  journalism  ethics 
9 days ago by nelson
In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs accepted the request, Satyam introduced himself as a marketer for technology startups.
9 days ago by jeffhammond
In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs…
from instapaper
9 days ago by jrheard
Ugh. This is something we will _never_ do. And we get asked all the time.
9 days ago by leolaporte
Bribes for blogs: How Brands Secretly Buy Their Way Into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories
from twitter
9 days ago by matthurst
In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs…
from instapaper
9 days ago by yudha87
RT jiman_yoon : 기업들은 어떻게 포브스, 패스트 컴패니, 허핑턴 포스트에 비밀스럽게 자신들을 광고했나 http://bit.ly/2nuIGIq 언론 매체를 직접 공략하지 않고, 언론 매체에 글을 기고하는 사람들에게 접촉해서, 글에 일종의 PPL을 하는 식. December 06, 2017 at 11:50AM http://twitter.com/jiman_yoon/status/938239081582026752
IFTTT  Twitter  ththlink 
9 days ago by seoulrain
An Outline investigation found that contributors to prominent publications have taken payments in exchange for positive coverage.
media  advertising  marketing 
9 days ago by jorgebarba
RT : Any publisher that based their business plan on unpaid or ridiculously cheap content is to blame for this.
from twitter
9 days ago by dylan20
How brands secretly buy their way into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories
from twitter
9 days ago by jeremydfranklin
@THErealDVORAK
9 days ago by bdougherty
How brands secretly buy their way into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories https://t.co/2CRqI29g3q
via:packrati.us 
9 days ago by bytebot
Jon Christian, reporting for The Outline:

People involved with the payoffs are extremely reluctant to discuss them, but four contributing writers to prominent publications including Mashable, Inc, Business Insider, and Entrepreneur told me they have personally accepted payments in exchange for weaving promotional references to brands into their work on those sites. Two of the writers acknowledged they have taken part in the scheme for years, on behalf of many brands. Mario Ruiz, a spokesperson for Business Insider, said in an email that “Business Insider has a strict policy that prohibits any of our writers, whether full-time staffers or contributors, from accepting payment of any kind in exchange for coverage.”

One of them, a contributor to Fast Company and other outlets who asked not to be identified by name, described how he had inserted references to a well-known startup that offers email marketing software into multiple online articles, in Fast Company and elsewhere, on behalf of a marketing agency he declined to name. To make the references seem natural, he said, he often links to case studies and how-to guides published by the startup on its own site. Other times, he’ll just praise a certain aspect of the company’s business to support a point in an otherwise unrelated story. […]

The Fast Company writer also defended the practice by arguing that it’s enabled by editors who are hungry for cheap or unpaid blog content. Many high-volume sites, including the Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, and Forbes, maintain networks of unpaid contributors who publish large amounts of material.

That’s a pathetic defense. Everyone is guilty in this racket — the “sponsors” who pay for this bullshit, the writers who accept the payola, and publications that blindly run these stories. There’s a complete and shameless lack of integrity from all three sides.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
9 days ago by rufous
In late October, TechCrunch editor-at-large John Biggs noticed a Facebook Messenger request from someone he didn’t know, a man named Varun Satyam. When Biggs accepted the request, Satyam introduced himself as a marketer for technology startups. (bookmarked for offline reading)
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 days ago by moresby
Jon Christian:
<p> Interviews with more than two dozen marketers, journalists, and others familiar with similar pay-for-play offers revealed a dubious corner of online publishing in which publicists, ranging from individuals like Satyam to medium-sized “digital marketing firms” that blur traditional lines between advertising and public relations, quietly pay off journalists to promote their clients in articles that make no mention of the financial arrangement.

People involved with the payoffs are extremely reluctant to discuss them, but four contributing writers to prominent publications including Mashable, Inc, Business Insider, and Entrepreneur told me they have personally accepted payments in exchange for weaving promotional references to brands into their work on those sites. Two of the writers acknowledged they have taken part in the scheme for years, on behalf of many brands.

One of them, a contributor to Fast Company and other outlets who asked not to be identified by name, described how he had inserted references to a well-known startup that offers email marketing software into multiple online articles, in Fast Company and elsewhere, on behalf of a marketing agency he declined to name. To make the references seem natural, he said, he often links to case studies and how-to guides published by the startup on its own site. </p>


I've heard about variants of this for a while, specifically around the Forbes "contributors" (who aren't staff; in effect they're outside bloggers). After I'd left the Guardian, I saw claims that there were similar paid links at The Guardian. I investigated them via those who claimed to have paid for links: they didn't check out. (I think the middlemen selling links claimed it so they could charge more for the places where they could sell links.)

It's an unsurprising wrinkle. Good journalism by Christian to pin it down.
brands  payment  journalism 
10 days ago by charlesarthur
How brands secretly buy their way into Forbes, Fast Company, and HuffPost stories via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2jiUCZx
IFTTT  Instapaper  Archive  Article 
10 days ago by TypingPixels
RT : The lesson here: sites need to pay their writers.
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by andriak
Man, people only ask me to randomly promote their products in barely related articles for free. I’m insulted.
from twitter_favs
10 days ago by kohlmannj