Life on the Dirtiest Block in San Francisco - The New York Times


17 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy 10 weeks ago.


"Programmers are trained to seek maximal and global solutions. Why solve a specific problem in one place when you can fix the general problem for everybody, and for all time? We don't think of this as hubris, but as a laudable economy of effort. And the startup funding culture of big risk, big reward encourages this grandiose mode of thinking. There is powerful social pressure to avoid incremental change, particularly any change that would require working with people outside tech and treating them as intellectual equals.
Second, treating the world as a software project gives us a rationale for being selfish. The old adage has it that if you are given ten minutes to cut down a tree, you should spend the first five sharpening your axe. We are used to the idea of bootstrapping ourselves into a position of maximum leverage before tackling a problem. In the real world, this has led to a pathology where the tech sector maximizes its own comfort. You don't have to go far to see this. Hop on BART after the conference and take a look at Oakland, or take a stroll through downtown San Francisco and try to persuade yourself you're in the heart of a boom that has lasted for forty years. You'll see a residential theme park for tech workers, surrounded by areas of poverty and misery that have seen no benefit and ample harm from our presence. We pretend that by maximizing our convenience and productivity, we're hastening the day when we finally make life better for all those other people." -Maciej Cegłowski

http://idlewords.com/talks/sase_panel.htm
class  city  sfbay  decline 
6 weeks ago by ingenu
Life on the Dirtiest Block in San Francisco The 300 block of Hyde Street in San Francisco received 2,227 complaints about street and sidewalk cleanliness over the past decade, more than any other. Credit…
7 weeks ago by chadlandman
The city’s new mayor has made cleaner streets a top priority. Residents say it will take much more than a broom to do it.

The city has replaced more than 300 lampposts corroded by dog and human urine over the past three years, according to the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Replacing the poles became more urgent after a lamppost collapsed in 2015, crushing a car.
inequality  cities 
9 weeks ago by jellis
RT : Real fine pairing of SF stories here:
from twitter
9 weeks ago by dunstan
This is SF now and not just on this block: Life on the Dirtiest Block in San Francisco via
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9 weeks ago by akalin
It's like the Giving Tree, but for crack
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9 weeks ago by schraeds
The 300 block of Hyde Street in San Francisco received 2,227 complaints about street and sidewalk cleanliness over the past decade, more than any other. Credit…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by mjbrej
Life on the Dirtiest Block in San Francisco
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9 weeks ago by ndawson
The city’s new mayor has made cleaner streets a top priority. Residents say it will take much more than a broom to do it.
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by evansims
The city’s new mayor has made cleaner streets a top priority. Residents say it will take much more than a broom to do it.
9 weeks ago by briandrum