Mr. Rogers's Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Kids - The Atlantic


110 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy 15 days ago.


Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Children via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2kV4Uzh
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5 days ago by cottonlion
For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. via Pocket
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6 days ago by ghiden
Per the pamphlet, there were nine steps for translating into Freddish:

“State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​​
“Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
“Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
“Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
“Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
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6 days ago by olanthanide
via Pocket - Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Children - Added June 09, 2018 at 04:37PM
7 days ago by mikele
For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility.
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10 days ago by WFreeland
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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11 days ago by iany
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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11 days ago by sneak
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language.
11 days ago by sfriedenberg
"...extraordinarily good at imagining where children's minds might go.
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11 days ago by Anne
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility.
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12 days ago by mud
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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12 days ago by michaelfox
"Per the pamphlet, there were nine steps for translating into Freddish:

1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​​

2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.

3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”

4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.

5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.

6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.

7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.

8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.

9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing."
children  communication  fredrogers  language  parenting  2018 
12 days ago by robertogreco
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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13 days ago by mattl
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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13 days ago by childsrevolt
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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13 days ago by than
“Rogers was extraordinarily good at imagining where children’s minds might go. ” https://t.co/wcZWxXIiLY Interesting. pic.twitter.com/HXuAev7GSZ

— Will Richardson (@willrich45) June 10, 2018
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13 days ago by willrichardson
Per the pamphlet, there were nine steps for translating into Freddish:

1. “State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​​
2. “Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
3. “Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
4. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
5. “Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
6. “Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
7. “Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
8. “Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
9. “Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
language  misterrogers  children 
13 days ago by sspela
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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13 days ago by aviflax
Look at how deeply Mr. Rogers understood children, and how he led with kindness.
copywriting  misterrogers  theatlantic  psychology  mastery 
13 days ago by cmananian
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility.
Archive  kids  parenting 
13 days ago by dvand5
These are nice and quite intricate - Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Children
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13 days ago by puja
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. via Pocket
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13 days ago by domingogallardo
Per the pamphlet, there were nine steps for translating into Freddish:

“State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​​
“Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
“Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
“Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
“Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
language  communication 
13 days ago by zryb
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. via Pocket
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13 days ago by sextopus
In 1977, about a decade into the show’s run, Arthur Greenwald and another writer named Barry Head cracked open a bottle of scotch while on a break, and coined the term Freddish. They later created an illustrated manual called “Let’s Talk About Freddish,” a loving parody of the demanding process of getting all the words just right for Rogers. “What Fred understood and was very direct and articulate about was that the inner life of children was deadly serious to them,” said Greenwald.

Per the pamphlet, there were nine steps for translating into Freddish:

“State the idea you wish to express as clearly as possible, and in terms preschoolers can understand.” Example: It is dangerous to play in the street. ​​​​​​
“Rephrase in a positive manner,” as in It is good to play where it is safe.
“Rephrase the idea, bearing in mind that preschoolers cannot yet make subtle distinctions and need to be redirected to authorities they trust.” As in, “Ask your parents where it is safe to play.”
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate all elements that could be considered prescriptive, directive, or instructive.” In the example, that’d mean getting rid of “ask”: Your parents will tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase any element that suggests certainty.” That’d be “will”: Your parents can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Rephrase your idea to eliminate any element that may not apply to all children.” Not all children know their parents, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play.
“Add a simple motivational idea that gives preschoolers a reason to follow your advice.” Perhaps: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is good to listen to them.
“Rephrase your new statement, repeating the first step.” “Good” represents a value judgment, so: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them.
“Rephrase your idea a final time, relating it to some phase of development a preschooler can understand.” Maybe: Your favorite grown-ups can tell you where it is safe to play. It is important to try to listen to them, and listening is an important part of growing.
13 days ago by copystar
The 9 rules of communicating with kids that Mr Rogers used. Use as an example - Intro to PW students read it, we discuss the rules and draw out how he rewrote sentences to be more useful to target audience (children). Intro students then write five rules of writing for college students
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13 days ago by stevej27
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility.
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13 days ago by psanwikarja
Favorite tweet:

Mr. Rogers had an intentional manner of speaking to kids, which his writers called, “Freddish” https://t.co/Ste0CEGvPz pic.twitter.com/jCZESTz1bz

— Jenni Leder👩🏻‍🎤 (@thoughtbrain) June 9, 2018
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13 days ago by crw
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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13 days ago by artlung
Favorite tweet:

Mr. Rogers had an intentional manner of speaking to kids, which his writers called, “Freddish” https://t.co/Ste0CEGvPz pic.twitter.com/jCZESTz1bz

— Jenni Leder👩🏻‍🎤 (@thoughtbrain) June 9, 2018
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14 days ago by justinsincl
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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14 days ago by jasenpheffer
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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14 days ago by kohlmannj
Fred Rogers on the set of Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred…
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14 days ago by abrad45
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. via Pocket
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14 days ago by coordinated
The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public television, Fred Rogers represents the most important human values: respect, compassion, kindness, integrity, humility. via Pocket
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14 days ago by trisignia
Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Children via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2kV4Uzh
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14 days ago by jaywest
Mr. Rogers had an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language, writes Maxwell King
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14 days ago by briantrice
Wonderful article on the precision of Fred Rogers’ language
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14 days ago by stinkingpig
Fred Rogers on the set of <em>Mr. Rogers's Neighborhood</em> in 1993 Gene J. Puskar / AP For the millions of adults who grew up watching him on public…
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14 days ago by indirect