The end of the internet startup - Vox


25 bookmarks. First posted by adrian802 10 weeks ago.


The end of the internet startup
from twitter
9 weeks ago by vonhaller
I've had similar thoughts, but more like "how does your startup survive" when the big boys come knocking.
from twitter
10 weeks ago by etucker
But in other ways Tesla represents a departure from the Silicon Valley norm. While Apple manufactures iPhones in China, Tesla operates its car factory in Fremont, California. Where Uber and Airbnb have avoided owning the cars and houses, Tesla spent billions of dollars on a battery factory.

So even if incumbents like Google, Facebook, and Amazon continue to dominate the market for online services, that doesn’t mean they’ll remain the leaders of technology innovation more broadly. Rather, innovation may shift in dramatically different directions — toward electric cars and delivery drones, for example, rather than smartphone apps. We’ve gotten used to thinking of Silicon Valley, the internet, and innovation as interchangeable, but the next wave of innovation might look very different from what we’re used to.
beyondsiliconvalley 
10 weeks ago by itstheglue
Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images Where technology and economics collide Silicon Valley is supposed to be a place where a couple of guys in a garage or a dorm…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by ecandino
The end of the internet startup
from twitter_favs
10 weeks ago by jonbstrong
Today’s technology giants have become a lot more savvy about anticipating and preempting threats to their dominance. They’ve done this by aggressively expanding into new markets and by acquiring potential rivals when they’re still relatively small. And, some critics say, they’ve gotten better at controlling and locking down key parts of the internet’s infrastructure, closing off paths that early internet companies used to reach a mass market.
course 
10 weeks ago by aweissman
Silicon Valley is supposed to be a place where a couple of guys in a garage or a dorm room can start companies that change the world. It happened with Apple and Microsoft in the 1970s, AOL in the 1980s, Amazon, Yahoo, and Google in the 1990s, and Facebook in the 2000s.
But the 2010s seem to be suffering from a startup drought. People are still starting startups, of course. But the last really big tech startup success, Facebook, is 13 years old.
Until last year, Uber seemed destined to be Silicon Valley’s newest technology giant. But now Uber’s CEO has resigned in disgrace and the company’s future is in doubt. Other technology companies launched in the past 10 years don’t seem to be in the same league. Airbnb, the most valuable American tech startup after Uber, is worth $31 billion, about 7 percent of Facebook’s value. Others — like Snap, Square, and Slack — are worth much less.
So what’s going on? On a recent trip to Silicon Valley, I posed that question to several technology executives and startup investors.
“When I look at like Google and Amazon in the 1990s, I kind of feel like it's Columbus and Vasco da Gama sailing out of Portugal the first time,” said Jay Zaveri, an investor at the Silicon Valley firm Social Capital.
The early internet pioneers grabbed the “low-hanging fruit,” Zaveri suggested, occupying lucrative niches like search, social networks, and e-commerce. By the time latecomers like Pinterest and Blue Apron came along, the pickings had gotten slimmer.
But others told me there was more to the story than that. Today’s technology giants have become a lot more savvy about anticipating and preempting threats to their dominance. They’ve done this by aggressively expanding into new markets and by acquiring potential rivals when they’re still relatively small. And, some critics say, they’ve gotten better at controlling and locking down key parts of the internet’s infrastructure, closing off paths that early internet companies used to reach a mass market.
As a result, an industry that used to be famous for its churn is starting to look like a conventional oligopoly — dominated by a handful of big companies whose perch atop the industry looks increasingly secure.
#innovation  #techcompanies  #distruptive  #strategy  #M&A  #acquisition 
10 weeks ago by phil_hendrix
We haven't had a major new technology company in more than 10 years.
business 
10 weeks ago by zm
Silicon Valley is supposed to be a place where a couple of guys in a garage or a dorm room can start companies that change the world. It happened with Apple and Microsoft in the 1970s, AOL in the 1980s, Amazon, Yahoo, and Google in the 1990s, and Facebook in the 2000s. (bookmarked for offline reading)
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 weeks ago by moresby
We haven't had a major new technology company in more than 10 years.
siliconvalley  Entrepreneurship  startups  Innovation 
10 weeks ago by jorgebarba
Well articulated article on why we haven't had any huge internet companies take off in the past 10 years.
from twitter
10 weeks ago by jcinis
We haven't had a major new technology company in more than 10 years.
10 weeks ago by jokela
The end of the internet startup
IFTTT  bitly 
10 weeks ago by trieloff
Timothy Lee:
<p>the 2010s seem to be suffering from a startup drought. People are still starting startups, of course. But the last really big tech startup success, Facebook, is 13 years old.

Until last year, Uber seemed destined to be Silicon Valley’s newest technology giant. But now Uber’s CEO has resigned in disgrace and the company’s future is in doubt. Other technology companies launched in the past 10 years don’t seem to be in the same league. Airbnb, the most valuable American tech startup after Uber, is worth $31 billion, about 7 percent of Facebook’s value. Others — like Snap, Square, and Slack — are worth much less.

So what’s going on? On a recent trip to Silicon Valley, I posed that question to several technology executives and startup investors.

“When I look at like Google and Amazon in the 1990s, I kind of feel like it's Columbus and Vasco da Gama sailing out of Portugal the first time,” said Jay Zaveri, an investor at the Silicon Valley firm Social Capital.

The early internet pioneers grabbed the “low-hanging fruit,” Zaveri suggested, occupying lucrative niches like search, social networks, and e-commerce. By the time latecomers like Pinterest and Blue Apron came along, the pickings had gotten slimmer.</p>


This doesn't make sense. There aren't big startups, apart from the gigantic Uber, Snap, AirBnB, Square, hang on, don't go, I'll run out of names in a minute, Slack…

One could have thought this at any time from 1997. It still isn't true. There will be other big startups; you just aren't looking in the right place.
innovation  startup  siliconvalley 
10 weeks ago by charlesarthur
Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"? Where technology and economics collide Silicon Valley is supposed to be a place where a…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by yudha87
Silicon Valley is supposed to be a place where a couple of guys in a garage or a dorm room can start companies that change the world. It happened with Apple and…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by adrian802