Alexa Is a Revelation for the Blind - The Atlantic


34 bookmarks. First posted by aebraddy april 2018.


Really lovely story from about what voice assistants can offer the elderly—like his father
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may 2018 by dpwolf
Really lovely story from about what voice assistants can offer the elderly—like his father
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may 2018 by tamberg
Alexa Is a Revelation for the Blind
from twitter
may 2018 by Cmacmurchy
Alexa is a revelation for the blind, writes @ibogost: https://t.co/hR7ov0bMuY pic.twitter.com/NPHjCFF9n3

— The Atlantic (@TheAtlantic) April 15, 2018
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april 2018 by leanderwattig
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution. “Is it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. via Pocket
pocket 
april 2018 by jburkunk
via Pocket - Alexa Is a Revelation for the Blind - Added April 16, 2018 at 10:50PM
april 2018 by mikele
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution. “Is it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed.
Archive  instapaper  tenpla 
april 2018 by WFreeland
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution. “Is it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. via Pocket
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april 2018 by archizoo
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution.
technology 
april 2018 by Pasanpr
Another problem: While voice-activated devices do understand natural language pretty well, the way most of us speak has been shaped by the syntax of digital searches. Dad’s speech hasn’t. He talks in an old-fashioned manner—one now dotted with the staccato march of time. “Alexa, tell us the origin and, uh, well, the significance, I suppose, of Christmas,” for example.
language  computers  nice 
april 2018 by Vincennes
This is incredibly humbling. "Alexa is a revelation for the blind".
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april 2018 by TracyWMeyer
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution. “Is it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. via Pocket
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april 2018 by hansdorsch
Ian Bogost:
<p>Sure, Dad [who is almost completely blind after a car accident in 1954] can still pick up the phone and call people. But who talks on the phone anymore?

Now, at 82—and with a different technology on offer—Dad is willing to adapt. After his initial fumbles with the Echo, he begins to get the hang of it, asking Alexa for football scores and stock-market updates, or to tell him who the president of Venezuela is. He discovers that, for some reason, Alexa isn’t set up to report the Tokyo Stock Exchange’s Nikkei index, and he begins to enjoy posing questions the device can’t answer. He taunts it the way everyone else does: “Alexa, what would you like for breakfast?”

Dad’s background as a psychologist makes his initial error of address—Electra rather than Alexa—accidentally funny. Carl Jung, the founder of analytical psychology, coined the Electra complex to name a girl’s competition with her mother for the attention of her father—the feminine corollary of the Oedipus complex. But unlike in Jung’s formulation, my mother relishes this new interloper. For decades, Mom has facilitated my father’s access to news and information—and she’s happy to be unseated by a rival, even if it’s just a fabric-covered cylinder with a light on top. Even so, this new setup is not perfect. “Dad often gets his commands wrong,” Mom reports, “and he gets frustrated when she does not understand him.”

When I was younger, Dad would write me letters—big, weird, angular script on stationery left over from his private practice. That became harder for him over time, as his vision and dexterity degraded—and I was never a very good written correspondent anyway. Then email and text messaging came along, and communication began to channel through computers—and for Dad, through my mother. There’s a difference between being read a letter addressed to you, and being a secondary party to communications on someone else’s personal device.

The Echo promised to rectify this slight. Dad can dictate a message to Alexa, and it will arrive on my Echo, as well as in an app on my phone, as both a recording and a transcribed text message.</p>
amazon  blind  alexa 
april 2018 by charlesarthur
Legally blind since age 18, my father missed out on the first digital revolution. “Is it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. via Pocket
Pocket 
april 2018 by mrj0e
“There’s a difference between being read a letter addressed to you, and being a secondary party to communications on someone else’s personal device.”https://t.co/XybDvx3HeT

— Jane Dallaway (@JaneDallaway) April 16, 2018
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april 2018 by JaneDallaway
“I s it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. Leaning in close is his trademark maneuver: Dad has been…
from instapaper
april 2018 by evanwalsh
“I s it ‘Electra?’” my father asks, leaning in close to the Amazon Echo my mother has just installed. Leaning in close is his trademark maneuver: Dad has been…
from instapaper
april 2018 by peterjblack
"Alexa Is a Revelation for the Blind"
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april 2018 by AramZS
Alexa is a revelation for the blind, writes :
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april 2018 by JoshuaJBerk