The End Is Near for Mobile Apps – Member Feature Stories – Medium


21 bookmarks. First posted by seoulrain 15 days ago.


A mildly interesting take on the future of apps, or lack thereof:

TLDR?
from twitter
12 days ago by rodreegez
Lance Ng:
<p>When smartphones first appeared, major corporations rushed to make apps. Then they realized it was a real headache to maintain them. Every time you update information on your website or promote a product, you have to do the same on your app. And every time a handset manufacturer updates its operating system, you have to debug your app to make sure it keeps working — plus there are the pains of managing bugs on different brands, models, and screen sizes. If you’ve ever been involved in mobile app development, you know what I’m talking about.

The truth is, unless you are a major retailer or content publisher that needs to sell or deliver to customers frequently, all you really need is a mobile-friendly website. If information is all people want, they’re going to Google it in a browser.

Given the first two points, this third is a logical evolution and is already happening in some parts of the world. It’s what the industry calls “building an ecosystem.” The strategy involves binding users’ daily behaviors and spending into their mobile apps.

A good example is how restaurants and cafes are integrating into food delivery apps instead of maintaining their own online order and delivery systems. In turn, these food delivery apps are consolidating with mobile wallet or ride-share apps to provide synergy and convenience to users. Consider Go-Jek, the biggest motorcycle ride-share app in Indonesia. To many people, it’s an all-in-one mobile wallet, ride-hailing, food delivery, and lifestyle services app.

Go-Jek took its inspiration from China’s WeChat, the biggest instant messaging app in that country, which has integrated just about every lifestyle service you can think of into their mobile wallet section.</p>


The "platform rolling up apps" might apply in China, and possibly some parts of Asia, but I don't see it happening in Europe. And for mobile apps: you do the updates to the web page and the app simultaneously via an API.
mobile  apps 
13 days ago by charlesarthur
In the next three to seven years, I expect most mobile apps to disappear. With them, we’ll witness the loss of billions in venture capital that we’ve poured into the start-up sector.
13 days ago by phutwo
In the next three to seven years, I expect most mobile apps to disappear. With them, we’ll witness the loss of billions in venture capital that we’ve poured into the start-up sector.
Archive 
13 days ago by plouf
“Apps must fulfill a frequent, functional purpose instead of just providing information.” THIS.
from twitter_favs
14 days ago by joseph
The End Is Near for Mobile Apps

How we went from “there’s an app for that” to “meh, do we really need one?”
from twitter_favs
14 days ago by KateSherrill
In the next three to seven years, I expect most mobile apps to disappear. With them, we’ll witness the loss of billions in venture capital that we’ve poured into the start-up sector.
s 
14 days ago by igorette
via Pocket - The End Is Near for Mobile Apps - Added November 04, 2018 at 11:36PM
14 days ago by mikele
The End Is Near for Mobile Apps – Member Feature Stories – Medium via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2RyRAiu
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14 days ago by chaoxian
RT HookedOnMedium : [👏1.3k] 모바일 앱 시대의 종결. 개인이 설치하는 앱은 100개 내외이고 그 중 빈번히 사용하는 앱은 30개정도. 새로운 앱을 출시하는 것보다 기존 앱에 통합하는 것이 앞으로의 모습. 이미 위챗, 고젯은 '앱을 위한 앱'으로 다수의 앱을 담는 '앱플랫폼'이 되고 있다고. http://bit.ly/2PGaaaX November 04, 2018 at 03:14PM http://twitter.com/HookedOnMedium/status/1058965813032439808
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15 days ago by seoulrain