The China Cultural Clash – Stratechery by Ben Thompson


53 bookmarks. First posted by pauldwaite 15 days ago.


“It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the latter’s dealings with China. via Pocket
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2 days ago by driptray
“It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the latter’s dealings with China. via Pocket
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3 days ago by keithprime
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
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3 days ago by broderboy
“It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the latter’s dealings with China.
Pocket 
7 days ago by nildram
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
8 days ago by MitchWagner
RT : The China Cultural Clash

The NBA controversy in China highlights a culture clash that bot…
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8 days ago by lchin
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
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9 days ago by mattl
via Stratechery by Ben Thompson Member Feed https://stratechery.com
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12 days ago by joewiz
The China Cultural Clash via
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13 days ago by dinomite
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The NBA controversy in China highlights a culture clash that bot…
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13 days ago by joha04
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
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13 days ago by svs
Good article discussing the complexities of doing business in China following on the NBA issues started with a single tweet. 🇨🇳
14 days ago by thingles
‘The China Cultural Clash’ by John Gruber via Daring Fireball https://ift.tt/30YOUyN
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14 days ago by daisy55
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
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14 days ago by jrdodds
from Daring Fireball

Speaking of Ben Thompson, his column this week at Stratechery is so good:

“It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the latter’s dealings with China. The tweet, a reference to the ongoing protests in Hong Kong, “hurt the feelings of the Chinese people” (a rather frequent occurrence). The Global Times, a Chinese government-run English-language newspaper, stated in an editorial:

Daryl Morey, general manager of the NBA team the Houston Rockets, has obviously gotten himself into trouble. He tweeted a photo saying “fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong” on Saturday while accompanying his team in Tokyo. The tweet soon set the team’s Chinese fans ablaze. It can be imagined how Morey’s tweet made them disappointed and furious. Shortly afterward, CCTV sports channel and Tencent sports channel both announced they would suspend broadcasting Rockets’ games. Some of the team’s Chinese sponsors and business partners also started to suspend cooperation with the Rockets.

There’s one rather glaring hole in this story of immediate outrage from Chinese fans over Morey’s tweet: Twitter is banned in China.

(This whole NBA/China story broke over the weekend, after Ben and I had recorded the new episode of my podcast — otherwise we’d have spent an hour on it, I’m sure.)

The gist of it is that 25 years ago, when the West opened trade relations with China, we expected our values regarding foundational values like freedom of speech, personal liberty, and democracy to spread to China.

Instead, the opposite is happening. China maintains strict control over what its people see on the Internet — the Great Firewall works. They ban our social networks where free speech reins, but we accept and use their social networks, like TikTok, where content contrary to the Chinese Community Party line is suppressed.

Worse, multinational mega corporations like Apple and Disney are put in a bind — they must choose between speaking up for values such as the right to privacy and freedom of speech, or making money in the Chinese market. The Chinese, with their oh-so-delicate sensibilities, simply can’t bear to hear an opinion with which they disagree.

 ★ 
ifttt  daringfireball 
14 days ago by josephschmitt
Speaking of Ben Thompson, his column this week at Stratechery is so good:

“It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the latter’s dealings with China. The tweet, a reference to the ongoing protests in Hong Kong, “hurt the feelings of the Chinese people” (a rather frequent occurrence). The Global Times, a Chinese government-run English-language newspaper, stated in an editorial:

Daryl Morey, general manager of the NBA team the Houston Rockets, has obviously gotten himself into trouble. He tweeted a photo saying “fight for freedom, stand with Hong Kong” on Saturday while accompanying his team in Tokyo. The tweet soon set the team’s Chinese fans ablaze. It can be imagined how Morey’s tweet made them disappointed and furious. Shortly afterward, CCTV sports channel and Tencent sports channel both announced they would suspend broadcasting Rockets’ games. Some of the team’s Chinese sponsors and business partners also started to suspend cooperation with the Rockets.

There’s one rather glaring hole in this story of immediate outrage from Chinese fans over Morey’s tweet: Twitter is banned in China.

(This whole NBA/China story broke over the weekend, after Ben and I had recorded the new episode of my podcast — otherwise we’d have spent an hour on it, I’m sure.)

The gist of it is that 25 years ago, when the West opened trade relations with China, we expected our values regarding foundational values like freedom of speech, personal liberty, and democracy to spread to China.

Instead, the opposite is happening. China maintains strict control over what its people see on the Internet — the Great Firewall works. They ban our social networks where free speech reins, but we accept and use their social networks, like TikTok, where content contrary to the Chinese Community Party line is suppressed.

Worse, multinational mega corporations like Apple and Disney are put in a bind — they must choose between speaking up for values such as the right to privacy and freedom of speech, or making money in the Chinese market. The Chinese, with their oh-so-delicate sensibilities, simply can’t bear to hear an opinion with which they disagree.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
14 days ago by rufous
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
from instapaper
14 days ago by wenxin
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14 days ago by stinkingpig
This has been true for awhile. But people are just starting to get it. Sparked by the recent democracy protests in Hong Kong.

I am increasingly convinced this is the point every company dealing with China will reach: what matters more, money or values?

The biggest, shift, though, is a mindset one. First, the Internet is an amoral force that reduces friction, not an inevitable force for good. Second, sometimes different cultures simply have fundamentally different values. Third, if values are going to be preserved, they must be a leading factor in economic entanglement, not a trailing one. This is the point that Clinton got the most wrong: money, like tech, is amoral. If we insist it matters most our own morals will inevitably disappear.
china  business  censorship  nba  sports  ethics  policy 
14 days ago by jefframnani
Ben Thompson says as China exports its domestic standards, the US should treat China's leveraging of market access into self-censorship by US companies as trade violations
15 days ago by joeo10
RT : The China Cultural Clash

The NBA controversy in China highlights a culture clash that bot…
from twitter
15 days ago by michaelkozak
Ben Thompson:
<p>at least as of this afternoon, there is a hint of unrest on the [TikTok] site: while searches for “Hong Kong” show city views and high school students playing along with the latest TikTok meme, searching for Hong Kong in Chinese (香港) brings up a video that shows the protestors as hooligans and vandals (this was the first result as of this afternoon, and the only video relating to the protests):

<img src="https://stratechery.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/tiktok-hongkong-1.jpg" width="100%" />

There appear to be similar efforts in the case of the NBA controversy. Searching for the “Warriors”, “Lakers”, and “Rockets” brings up the sort of content you would expect:

<img src="https://stratechery.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/tiktok-nba-english-1.jpg" width="100%" />

However, searching for the same team names in Chinese (“勇士”, “湖人”, and “火箭”, respectively) shows basketball-related results for the first two and nothing related for the third:

<img src="https://stratechery.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/tiktok-nba-chinese-2-copy.jpg" width="100%" />

This should raise serious concern in the United States and other Western countries: is it at all acceptable to have a social network that has a demonstrated willingness to censor content under the control of a country that has clearly different views on what constitutes free speech?

There is an established route for undoing this state of affairs: earlier this summer China’s Kunlun Tech Company agreed to divest Grindr under pressure from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS); Kunlun Tech had acquired Grindr without undergoing CFIUS review. TikTok similarly acquired Musical.ly without oversight and relaunched it as TikTok for the Western market; it is worth at least considering the possibility of a review given TikTok’s apparent willingness to censor content for Western audiences according to Chinese government wishes.</p>


The key question though is posed by Thompson slightly later:
<p>"I am increasingly convinced this is the point every company dealing with China will reach: what matters more, money or values?"</p>
china  business  tiktok  censorship 
15 days ago by charlesarthur
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
from instapaper
15 days ago by mojacc
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
from instapaper
15 days ago by leeomara
"There’s one rather glaring hole in this story of immediate outrage from Chinese fans over Morey’s tweet: Twitter is banned in China."…
from instapaper
15 days ago by mathewi
the Internet is an amoral force that reduces friction, not an inevitable force for good.
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15 days ago by mngful
It all started with a tweet: “It” refers to the current imbroglio surrounding Daryl Morey, the General Manager for the Houston Rockets of the National…
from instapaper
15 days ago by stevenbedrick