See No Evil


74 bookmarks. First posted by beep 10 weeks ago.


"Modular systems manage complexity by 'black-boxing' information; that is, they separate code or information into discrete units. A programmer need only know about the module with which she is working, because managing the complexity of the entire system would be too much to ask of any single individual. Modularity is the method we’ve devised to manage complexity at a time when we’re drowning in information. How do you manage the complexity of a system that procures goods from a huge variety of locations? You make it modular: when you black-box each component, you don’t need to know anything about it except that it meets your specifications. Information about provenance, labor conditions, and environmental impact is unwieldy when the goal of your system is simply to procure and assemble goods quickly. 'You could imagine a different way of doing things, so that you do know all of that,' said Russell, 'so that your gaze is more immersive and continuous. But what that does is inhibit scale.' And scale, of course, is key to a globalized economy."
a:Miriam-Posner  p:Logic  d:2018  w:3500  logisitics  international-trade  manufacturing  infrastructure  software-design  from instapaper
11 days ago by bankbryan
See No Evil
by Miriam Posner
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal?
toread  readinglist  push  infrastructure 
27 days ago by edsonm
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
4 weeks ago by DanTylkowski
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
5 weeks ago by bdeskin
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
5 weeks ago by mccutchen
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
7 weeks ago by robw
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from:instapaper 
7 weeks ago by tealtan
in re supply chains & supply chain software: "This peculiar state of knowing-while-not-knowing is not the explicit choice of any individual company but a system that’s grown up to accommodate the variety of goods that we demand, and the speed with which we want them. It’s embedded in software, as well as in the container ships that are globalization’s most visible emblem."
systems  economy 
7 weeks ago by saranrapjs
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? Trawling a hotel minibar one night while on a work trip to Amsterdam, I found a piece of chocolate with an unusual name: Tony’s Chocolonely.
IFTTT  Pocket 
8 weeks ago by garrettc
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
8 weeks ago by dylan
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal?
business  capitalism  data  logistics  argument  politics  ethics 
8 weeks ago by kmt
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal?
infrastructure  internet  software  network  via:hautepop  via:timmaughan  logicmag  economics  capitalism  supplychains 
8 weeks ago by danhon
Modern supply chains are amazing in their effectiveness, but transparency inside them is not a design objective.

> We call them “supply chains,” but that image is misleading. They really look more like a network of waterways, with thousands of tiny tributaries made up of sub-suppliers trickling into larger rivers of assembly, production, and distribution.

The parallels between supply-chain design and service oriented architecture are surprising. Modularity, interchangeability, limited dependencies. Supply-chains are in many ways a physical manifestation of that type of architecture.
9 weeks ago by thingles
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by breau

In the past twenty years, popular and academic audiences have taken a growing interest in the physical infrastructure of global supply chains. The journalist Alexis Madrigal’s Containers podcast took on the question of how goods travel so far, so quickly. The writer Rose George traveled the world on a container ship for her book Ninety Percent of Everything. And Marc Levinson’s The Box startled Princeton University Press by becoming a national bestseller. Most recently, Deborah Cowen’s The Deadly Life of Logistics offered a surprisingly engrossing history of that all-important industry.

These books help us visualize the physical infrastructure that makes global capitalism possible. But the data infrastructure has yet to be explored. How does information travel through the supply chain in such a peculiar way, so that I know to wait impatiently at my door at the exact moment my new iPhone will arrive—but no one really seems to know how it has gotten to me?
business  capitalism  data  supply.chains  supply.chain.management  infrastructure  shipping  cargo  economics  global.economy  trade 
9 weeks ago by po
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? Trawling a hotel minibar one night while on a work trip to Amsterdam, I found a piece of chocolate with an unusual name: Tony’s Chocolonely. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  browser 
9 weeks ago by minifig
“You’re basically not improving the current problem, which is a lack of visibility.”
scm  iot  ml  supply  chain  2018-08-13  evil 
9 weeks ago by bekishore
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by makenosound
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? Trawling a hotel minibar one night while on a work trip to Amsterdam, I found a piece of chocolate with an unusual name: Tony’s Chocolonely. via Pocket
to_share 
9 weeks ago by puzzlement
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by danieroux
How can it be possible to predict a package’s arrival down to the hour, yet know almost nothing about the conditions of its manufacture? (...)
Supply chains are murky—just in very specific ways. We’ve chosen scale, and the conceptual apparatus to manage it, at the expense of finer-grained knowledge that could make a more just and equitable arrangement possible.
miriam-posner  supply-chains  socioeconomics  logicmag  logistics  magazine-articles  technology-and-society  econ-geo 
9 weeks ago by haikara
Miriam Posner: "It’s entirely possible to have an astoundingly effective supply chain while also knowing very little about it. Not only is it possible: it may be the enabling condition of capitalism at a global scale."
infrastructure  globalization  capitalism  2018_mixbook_contender 
9 weeks ago by jbushnell
supply chain, handel
ekonomi  samtiden 
9 weeks ago by bengtgunnar
RT : This article perfectly bridges Seeing like a State and my old essay about working at Target.
from twitter
9 weeks ago by kevinriggle-twitter
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by loganrhyne
How supply chains work. “It’s a staggering kind of undertaking. If you’re a small apparel company, then you still might have 50,000 suppliers in your supply chain. You’ll have a personal relationship with about 200 to 500 agents or intermediaries. We call them ‘supply chains’, but that image is misleading. They really look more like a network of waterways, with thousands of tiny tributaries made up of sub-suppliers trickling into larger rivers of assembly, production, and distribution”
erp  enterprise_software  logistics 
9 weeks ago by JohnDrake
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by flobosg
t’s not like there’s a control tower overseeing supply networks. Instead, each node has to talk only to its neighboring node, passing goods through a system that, considered in its entirety, is staggeringly complex. Supply chains are robust precisely because they’re decentralized and self-healing.
capitalism  infrastructure  data  supplychains  ruffian 
10 weeks ago by Walpole
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by digdoug
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by adrianhon
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
Instapaper 
10 weeks ago by adamclarkthomas
supply chain unknowns from sap software
UofWinds 
10 weeks ago by copystar
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? Trawling a hotel minibar one night while on a work trip to Amsterdam, I found a piece of chocolate with an unusual name: Tony’s Chocolonely.
article 
10 weeks ago by mud
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by stevenbedrick
According to the company, this goal actually landed them in legal trouble: Bellissimo, a Swiss chocolatier, sued Chocolonely in 2007, allegedly claiming that “slave-free chocolate is impossible to produce.”
modular  capitalism  supply  containers  infrastructure  shipping  business  programming  supplychain  globalization 
10 weeks ago by phillmv
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by thecosas
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal?
economics  business  capitalism  organization 
10 weeks ago by basemaly
by Miriam Posner Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? The Port…
from instapaper
10 weeks ago by hybridsolidr
" A company may have a handle on the factories that manufacture finished products, but what about their suppliers? What about the suppliers’ suppliers? And what about the raw materials?

" “It’s a staggering kind of undertaking,” said Bonnani. “If you’re a small apparel company, then you still might have 50,000 suppliers in your supply chain. You’ll have a personal relationship with about 200 to 500 agents or intermediaries. If you had to be in touch with everybody who made everything, you would either have a very small selection of products you could sell or an incredible margin that would give you the extra staff to do that.”

" We call them “supply chains,” but that image is misleading. They really look more like a network of waterways, with thousands of tiny tributaries made up of sub-suppliers trickling into larger rivers of assembly, production, and distribution. "
logistics  supply-chains 
10 weeks ago by kellyramsey
It’s entirely possible to have an astoundingly effective supply chain while also knowing very little about it. Not only is it possible: it may be the enabling condition of capitalism at a global scale.



This peculiar state of knowing-while-not-knowing is not the explicit choice of any individual company but a system that’s grown up to accommodate the variety of goods that we demand, and the speed with which we want them. It’s embedded in software, as well as in the container ships that are globalization’s most visible emblem.
supplychains  infrastructure  capitalism  latecapitalism  labor  exploitation 
10 weeks ago by beep