A Generation Grows Up in China Without Google, Facebook or Twitter - The New York Times


17 bookmarks. First posted by gmakris 14 days ago.


HONG KONG — Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study chemistry in Canada when he goes to college in 2020. Mr.
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6 days ago by jeffhammond
You can’t miss what you never had before.
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7 days ago by simsalis
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10 days ago by stinkingpig
“Our findings suggest that censorship in China is effective not only because the regime makes it difficult to access sensitive information, but also because it fosters an environment in which citizens do not demand such information in the first place”
marketing  google  power  socialnetworking  censorship  asia  capitalism  internet  identity  attention  china  twitter  corporations  culture 
11 days ago by allaboutgeorge
HONG KONG — Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study chemistry in Canada when he goes to college in 2020. Mr. via Pocket
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12 days ago by driptray
With popular social media sites like Google, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram blocked (not to mention thousands of other websites), Chinese teenagers are not only unaware of these platforms but are also "uninterested in knowing what has been censored online, allowing Beijing to build an alternative value system that competes with Western liberal democracy," Li Yuan reports for the New York Times. Li Yuan notes that this outlook represents "a departure even from those born in China in the 1980s," with the "rebels" of yesteryear largely gone.

NYT: "Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study chemistry in Canada when he goes to college in 2020. Mr. Wei is typical of Chinese teenagers in another way, too: He has never heard of Google or Twitter. He once heard of Facebook, though. It is 'maybe like Baidu?' he asked one recent afternoon, referring to China’s dominant search engine...Many young people in China have little idea what Google, Twitter or Facebook are, creating a gulf with the rest of the world...Many young people in China instead consume apps and services like Baidu, the social media service WeChat and the short-video platform Tik Tok. Often, they spout consumerism and nationalism."

The article points to research shared in this newsletter yesterday, conducted by two economists from Peking University and Stanford University, which explored Beijing university students' use of censorship circumvention tools and the factors that make their use more or less likely, which found that "...simply offering the tool did little to change behavior or beliefs, as there doesn’t appears to be much natural demand for the material that the government considers off-limits. But the tool had a big impact on those who were encouraged to use it." [The Impact of Media Censorship: Evidence from a Field Experiment in China (pdf) https://web.stanford.edu/~dyang1/cgi-bin/pdfs/1984bravenewworld_draft.pdf]
otf  china  asia  gfw  censorship  social  facebook  twitter  access 
13 days ago by dmcdev
As young Chinese grow up without access to free speech platforms, many seem uninterested in spotting online censorship, accepting Beijing's narrative
13 days ago by joeo10
Over the past decade, China blocked Google, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Now some of China’s young people are asking what those services even are.…
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13 days ago by mathewi
Top story: A Generation Grows Up in China Without Google, Facebook or Twitter …
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13 days ago by LibrariesVal
HONG KONG — Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study…
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13 days ago by kohlmannj
HONG KONG — Wei Dilong, 18, who lives in the southern Chinese city of Liuzhou, likes basketball, hip-hop music and Hollywood superhero movies. He plans to study chemistry in Canada when he goes to college in 2020. Mr.
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14 days ago by odelano