The year we wanted the internet to be smaller - The Verge


60 bookmarks. First posted by estreitinho december 2017.


The year we wanted the internet to be smaller | Tumblr / lovingletter Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. This… | http://ift.tt/2lmKijd | via Instapaper and IFTTT
IFTTT  Instapaper  recommended  readings  from instapaper
january 2018 by habi
The year we wanted the internet to be smaller via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2lmKijd
from-instapaper  archive 
january 2018 by lavallee
The old promise of the internet — niche communities, human connection, people exchanging ideas, maybe even paying each other for the work they’d made — never really lost its appeal, but this year it came back with a miniature vengeance.
internet  web  media 
january 2018 by robertocarroll
The old promise of the internet — niche communities, human connection, people exchanging ideas, maybe even paying each other for the work they’d made — never really lost its appeal, but this year it came back with a miniature vengeance.
january 2018 by jbenton
The old promise of the interne
january 2018 by branyon

The vast digital metropolis of the internet — that place that was supposed to make us feel never alone — failed us this year; we built what we needed on its outskirts.
january 2018 by mrled
The year we wanted the internet to be smaller - The Verge via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2lmKijd
IFTTT  Instapaper 
january 2018 by johnke
15.4 percent of Facebook users said they “greatly” or “somewhat” disliked using the product, while 17 percent of Twitter users said the same. That made them the most disliked of the six companies in question, which also included Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon. More than 10 percent of respondents described Facebook’s effect on society as “very negative,” and 10.5 percent said the same about Twitter — in both cases a higher number than the other four companies combined.

The old promise of the internet — niche communities, human connection, people exchanging ideas, maybe even paying each other for the work they’d made — never really lost its appeal, but this year it came back with a miniature vengeance.
internet  culture 
january 2018 by christopherming
Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. via Pocket
pocket 
january 2018 by jburkunk
“The internet when I was younger was just a bunch of weirdo strangers who were all weirdo strangers together and felt like a community for that.”
net 
january 2018 by rubbercat
The news dropped a week after this made me feel like it was all going to be ok
from twitter
january 2018 by genmon
Rather than the enormous platforms that couldn’t decide if , let alone how they had contributed to the election of a deranged narcissist or the rise of the virulently racist alt-right or a pending nuclear holocaust, why not something smaller, safer, more immediately useful? The old promise of the internet — niche communities, human connection, people exchanging ideas, maybe even paying each other for the work they’d made — never really lost its appeal, but this year it came back with a miniature vengeance. And there’s the kids who are bending major platforms to their will, having their fun on Instagram but circumventing the intended use by making “finstagrams,” separate, strange accounts that aren’t tied to the Facebook social graph and therefore let users post weirder, funnier content they wouldn’t share to everyone they know. It was an appealing prospect for creators with modest followings, especially those looking to “refocus away from massive distribution sites that sell everything to advertising companies, [and] focus on smaller, more tight-knit communities.” The basic idea was that not everyone needs to be an “internet megastar” to prove that their work has value. Much of what people have expected from traditional community structures — affirmation, information, a back-stop in the case of financial catastrophe or unwieldy loneliness — can feel more readily available online than it does in a society that seems to relish deepening the gulfs between us.
january 2018 by sechilds
VERGE: “Why tiny, weird online communities made a comeback in 2017” (via )
from twitter
january 2018 by Smokler
Tumblr / lovingletter Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. This…
from instapaper
january 2018 by louderthan10
The year we wanted the internet to be smaller https://t.co/TxqJEWXhda via @instapaper

— Ryan MacMichael (@supalaze) January 6, 2018
IFTTT  Twitter 
january 2018 by laze
The year we wanted the internet to be smaller: much of my social time online is now in private Slack…
no_tag  from twitter_favs
january 2018 by loughlin
The year we wanted the internet to be smaller: much of my social time online is now in private Slack…
from twitter
january 2018 by waxpancake
Niche online communities and media grew in 2017, through Patreon, TinyLetter, “finstagrams”, and more as people looked for alternatives to Facebook and Twitter
january 2018 by joeo10
“There is no limit to the amount of misfortune a person can take in via the internet”
from twitter_favs
january 2018 by jakemcgraw
Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  refind  s 
january 2018 by igorette
Favorite tweet: tek_news

HNews: Tiny, weird online communities made a comeback in 2017 https://t.co/4QEqsKZpLL

— Tech news (BOT) (@tek_news) January 1, 2018

http://twitter.com/tek_news/status/947758067587928065
IFTTT  twitter  favorite 
january 2018 by tswaterman
Quite curious read: "The year we wanted the internet to be smaller"
from twitter
january 2018 by tguemes
Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it.
january 2018 by marshallk
A sobering look at our need for niche communities. “The year we wanted the internet to be smaller”
from twitter_favs
december 2017 by matthillco
Tumblr / lovingletter Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. This…
from instapaper
december 2017 by kohlmannj
Tumblr / lovingletter Americans got tired of big social media in 2017. Or at least, we stopped wanting to look at it, and we stopped pretending to like it. This…
from instapaper
december 2017 by toph